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TITLE
Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (11 of 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_01_11
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF RECORDING
2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Alasdair Cameron
SOURCE
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
ASSET ID
41076
KEYWORDS
audios
farmers
farming
villages
dwellings
houses
farms
agriculture
built environment
settlements

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In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about various areas in the Rosehaugh Estate including Ballone and Castleton.

The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.

Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)

AC: Most of these buildings still remain but they've been added to by quite a few modern steel framed buildings that are more suited to the larger machines of today, rather than something that's just high enough for the horse and cart to get in the door.

CM: And the cottages at this farm Alasdair, would they remain now as individual buildings or, are they individual residences, or, or are they still there?

AC: I don't think they're still there. I think they're, the time I was there they were certainly not in use as living accommodation.

CM: Mmm-hmm.

AC: But it may have happened since then, I haven't been there since quite a few years.

CM: So that might be an example of what you were talking about earlier where ...?

AC: ... about conversions, yes.

CM: Uh-huh.

AC: There's two features that govern, well comes from the planning process that planners are trying to cut down on any houses in the countryside if at all possible but they will allow a conversion of farm buildings providing it doesn't change too much and still looks like a farm building. And the element of VAT is in to it, because, if you renovate an old house you have to pay VAT on everything whereas if you renovate farm buildings you can reclaim the VAT because it's industrial. It was not a feature that the government put in to help the farming community, it was basically for Docklands development in London who had a very strong lobby when they were converting warehouses, where the average flat is over a million and VAT is quite significant so that's a spin off of benefit to any farm buildings that are industrial.

Yes, I'm looking at Ballone, a 'compact holding known as Ballone'. That's the speak of the estate agent. It's, I think it's interesting in that it's actually had a new house, a replacement house, built on it due to development taking place on one of the other farms that had the same tenant and that in return for giving up his main land at Kessock for development, the estate have provided him with a new house on Ballone.

Now here's one name we can understand, Castleton, because it's, the, would've been the farm village beside the castle, and the castle is very visible from all directions. Usually the standard is visible for miles and that it's got an annual visitation from the Scottish Nationalists. I'm not talking politically; I'm talking of those that are interested in the history of Scotland, rather than the political party.

CM: And why, why would they be visiting? Will you tell us just a little bit about ...?

AC: It's, oh that's a difficult history one. I would have to look up my book for that. It's when the Scottish standard was raised on one of the many occasions we were going to attack the English I think

CM: At Castleton. Uh-huh.

AC: There's the remains of the castle at the top of the hill and that, I think it probably belongs to the Forestry Commission, the lands now. It was overgrown but it's been cleared probably about ten, twelve years ago, so it's, it's much more visible.

CM: And when you say the remains are still there, em, how, in what condition?

AC: Overgrown, but you can see the bumps and remains of some of the walls. There's a feature, I can't remember what time of year it is, where there's an attempt to get an organised march to the top and salute the standard in the best possible tradition.

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Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (11 of 32)

ROSS

2010s

audios; farmers; farming; villages; dwellings; houses; farms; agriculture; built environment; settlements;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about various areas in the Rosehaugh Estate including Ballone and Castleton.<br /> <br /> The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.<br /> <br /> Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: Most of these buildings still remain but they've been added to by quite a few modern steel framed buildings that are more suited to the larger machines of today, rather than something that's just high enough for the horse and cart to get in the door.<br /> <br /> CM: And the cottages at this farm Alasdair, would they remain now as individual buildings or, are they individual residences, or, or are they still there?<br /> <br /> AC: I don't think they're still there. I think they're, the time I was there they were certainly not in use as living accommodation.<br /> <br /> CM: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> AC: But it may have happened since then, I haven't been there since quite a few years.<br /> <br /> CM: So that might be an example of what you were talking about earlier where ...?<br /> <br /> AC: ... about conversions, yes.<br /> <br /> CM: Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> AC: There's two features that govern, well comes from the planning process that planners are trying to cut down on any houses in the countryside if at all possible but they will allow a conversion of farm buildings providing it doesn't change too much and still looks like a farm building. And the element of VAT is in to it, because, if you renovate an old house you have to pay VAT on everything whereas if you renovate farm buildings you can reclaim the VAT because it's industrial. It was not a feature that the government put in to help the farming community, it was basically for Docklands development in London who had a very strong lobby when they were converting warehouses, where the average flat is over a million and VAT is quite significant so that's a spin off of benefit to any farm buildings that are industrial.<br /> <br /> Yes, I'm looking at Ballone, a 'compact holding known as Ballone'. That's the speak of the estate agent. It's, I think it's interesting in that it's actually had a new house, a replacement house, built on it due to development taking place on one of the other farms that had the same tenant and that in return for giving up his main land at Kessock for development, the estate have provided him with a new house on Ballone. <br /> <br /> Now here's one name we can understand, Castleton, because it's, the, would've been the farm village beside the castle, and the castle is very visible from all directions. Usually the standard is visible for miles and that it's got an annual visitation from the Scottish Nationalists. I'm not talking politically; I'm talking of those that are interested in the history of Scotland, rather than the political party.<br /> <br /> CM: And why, why would they be visiting? Will you tell us just a little bit about ...?<br /> <br /> AC: It's, oh that's a difficult history one. I would have to look up my book for that. It's when the Scottish standard was raised on one of the many occasions we were going to attack the English I think<br /> <br /> CM: At Castleton. Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> AC: There's the remains of the castle at the top of the hill and that, I think it probably belongs to the Forestry Commission, the lands now. It was overgrown but it's been cleared probably about ten, twelve years ago, so it's, it's much more visible.<br /> <br /> CM: And when you say the remains are still there, em, how, in what condition?<br /> <br /> AC: Overgrown, but you can see the bumps and remains of some of the walls. There's a feature, I can't remember what time of year it is, where there's an attempt to get an organised march to the top and salute the standard in the best possible tradition.