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TITLE
Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (13 of 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_01_13
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF RECORDING
2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Alasdair Cameron
SOURCE
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
ASSET ID
41078
KEYWORDS
audios
farmers
farming
agriculture
built environment
villages
dwellings
houses
farms
settlements

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In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about various areas in the Rosehaugh Estate including Muiralehouse.

The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.

Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)

AC: Muiralehouse. Well, I suppose if you break it down into Muir, Ale and House it says it all. This was one of the ones that we noted had a silage tower. It's also got a couple of modern towers today for bulk feed. At this period it was quite an important dairy and at a slightly later period it had its own retail round and the tenant was the Mann family, that's [spells letter by letter] M-a-n-n. We've come across them before in a few locations and they're still around, and the famous slogan promoting their milk was 'Milk made a Mann out of me, let it make a man out of you.' May not appeal to the feminists today but never mind, that was a popular slogan in the period.

CM: You used an expression Alasdair, that they had their own 'retail round' did you say?

AC: Yes, where they would deliver bottled milk to your doorstep on a daily basis, which at one stage, the local rounds would've been a milk tank with a tap on it that went round on a horse and cart and you brought out your milk jug and you got it filled bulk on draught, but here they had moved on to bottled milk at a fairly early stage. It's interesting that the photo we have here of the byre, it's got overhead pipe work because obviously they were using milking machines and the vacuum power that operated the milking machines is visible over the stalls. The stalls or 'trevices' to give them their correct title, are concrete. At this period there was intense activity to clean up the milk trade to avoid wood that could harbour diseases: tuberculosis: brucellosis: all the different bugs that could affect the cow and the health of the milk. So the attempt was to get everything hard that could be cleaned and disinfected. The walkway between the stalls appears to be cobbles and that there's a dungy passage behind the cattle which is known as the 'gripe'. It varies in different parts of the country but the, that's generally the local term.

CM: And that's the drainage basically for, for the, the slurry?

AC: Just the cow dung would accumulate behind. Now obviously at this period there's milking machines and the milk goes into a bucket that's part of the milking machine. It's carried to be put through a cooler and is in, then when it's suitably cold, it's put into probably ten-gallon milk churns, and then it would be collected and taken to the central dairy in Dingwall. At this period, probably by rail; they might have to put it to the local railway station, because I know that when the Black Isle railway closed the farmers in the Avoch-Fortrose area had to buy a lorry and employ a driver to take their milk to the dairy plant in Dingwall, so I'm making that assumption backwards from that action.

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Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (13 of 32)

ROSS

2010s

audios; farmers; farming; agriculture; built environment; villages; dwellings; houses; farms; settlements;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about various areas in the Rosehaugh Estate including Muiralehouse.<br /> <br /> The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.<br /> <br /> Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: Muiralehouse. Well, I suppose if you break it down into Muir, Ale and House it says it all. This was one of the ones that we noted had a silage tower. It's also got a couple of modern towers today for bulk feed. At this period it was quite an important dairy and at a slightly later period it had its own retail round and the tenant was the Mann family, that's [spells letter by letter] M-a-n-n. We've come across them before in a few locations and they're still around, and the famous slogan promoting their milk was 'Milk made a Mann out of me, let it make a man out of you.' May not appeal to the feminists today but never mind, that was a popular slogan in the period. <br /> <br /> CM: You used an expression Alasdair, that they had their own 'retail round' did you say?<br /> <br /> AC: Yes, where they would deliver bottled milk to your doorstep on a daily basis, which at one stage, the local rounds would've been a milk tank with a tap on it that went round on a horse and cart and you brought out your milk jug and you got it filled bulk on draught, but here they had moved on to bottled milk at a fairly early stage. It's interesting that the photo we have here of the byre, it's got overhead pipe work because obviously they were using milking machines and the vacuum power that operated the milking machines is visible over the stalls. The stalls or 'trevices' to give them their correct title, are concrete. At this period there was intense activity to clean up the milk trade to avoid wood that could harbour diseases: tuberculosis: brucellosis: all the different bugs that could affect the cow and the health of the milk. So the attempt was to get everything hard that could be cleaned and disinfected. The walkway between the stalls appears to be cobbles and that there's a dungy passage behind the cattle which is known as the 'gripe'. It varies in different parts of the country but the, that's generally the local term.<br /> <br /> CM: And that's the drainage basically for, for the, the slurry?<br /> <br /> AC: Just the cow dung would accumulate behind. Now obviously at this period there's milking machines and the milk goes into a bucket that's part of the milking machine. It's carried to be put through a cooler and is in, then when it's suitably cold, it's put into probably ten-gallon milk churns, and then it would be collected and taken to the central dairy in Dingwall. At this period, probably by rail; they might have to put it to the local railway station, because I know that when the Black Isle railway closed the farmers in the Avoch-Fortrose area had to buy a lorry and employ a driver to take their milk to the dairy plant in Dingwall, so I'm making that assumption backwards from that action.