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TITLE
Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (17 of 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_02_02
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF RECORDING
2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Alasdair Cameron
SOURCE
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
ASSET ID
41082
KEYWORDS
audios
farmers
farming
agriculture
built environment
villages
dwellings
houses
farms

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In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about several architectural and agricultural features in Avoch.

The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.

Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)

AC: We've got pages and pages of site rents for the Police Station, the Bank House, the Station Hotel, which was a real station hotel because there was a station at Avoch. And we have the lands associated to the different parts of Avoch. The Dock is a distinctive area. Seatown is the bit that runs along the seafront where you've got a long line of cottages and, interesting names of the cottage in the Henrietta, there's Bayview, Seaview, Beach Villa; you can spot where these were. You've also got things like a feu for the Slaughter House so no transport involved in getting your meat. The War Department again had miscellaneous rents. The telephone kiosk was a feu duty of a shilling and certain names point towards what was there. Factory Lane - no factory now but it had quite a long history which is recorded elsewhere.

Various references to the quarry, or quarries, that were in the area. At these periods, there was a lot of quarries because to avoid transport you looked for a source of stone, or sand or gravel, as near to your building as possible, so some of these were actually quite small. There's an interesting one here called Shorelands Field, lying between Avoch, Fortrose Road, and the sea. It's still very visible today. It's overgrown but I do remember it was cultivated on a regular basis. It was a very nice location and was a very good growing area for early potatoes; sheltered, caught the sun, and at this period was let out to Alec Mann on a yearly tenancy of four pounds, five shillings per annum. The other piece on this page is certain annual dry multures, that's m-u-l-t-u-r-e-s, but they were usually pronounced 'mooters'. I don't quite know why but it was basically dues that had to be paid to the miller, and that basically, you were obliged to pay the miller if you didn't take your crop to be ground at the mill, and that the reference here is annual dry multures which was, basically, paying in cash what you would normally have paid the miller by using his services, in which case he would normally be paid by a proportion of the meal that he milled on your behalf, was his payment for the process.

We mentioned telephones before; there's also notes that the Post Office Engineering Department had tenancy for various poles and that came to eight shillings. We also have the new wonder of electricity and the local company at that period were known as the Grampian Electricity Supply Company and that they've got various payments around Tomich, Cromarty and Avoch to the estates.

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Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (17 of 32)

ROSS

2010s

audios; farmers; farming; agriculture; built environment; villages; dwellings; houses; farms;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about several architectural and agricultural features in Avoch.<br /> <br /> The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.<br /> <br /> Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: We've got pages and pages of site rents for the Police Station, the Bank House, the Station Hotel, which was a real station hotel because there was a station at Avoch. And we have the lands associated to the different parts of Avoch. The Dock is a distinctive area. Seatown is the bit that runs along the seafront where you've got a long line of cottages and, interesting names of the cottage in the Henrietta, there's Bayview, Seaview, Beach Villa; you can spot where these were. You've also got things like a feu for the Slaughter House so no transport involved in getting your meat. The War Department again had miscellaneous rents. The telephone kiosk was a feu duty of a shilling and certain names point towards what was there. Factory Lane - no factory now but it had quite a long history which is recorded elsewhere. <br /> <br /> Various references to the quarry, or quarries, that were in the area. At these periods, there was a lot of quarries because to avoid transport you looked for a source of stone, or sand or gravel, as near to your building as possible, so some of these were actually quite small. There's an interesting one here called Shorelands Field, lying between Avoch, Fortrose Road, and the sea. It's still very visible today. It's overgrown but I do remember it was cultivated on a regular basis. It was a very nice location and was a very good growing area for early potatoes; sheltered, caught the sun, and at this period was let out to Alec Mann on a yearly tenancy of four pounds, five shillings per annum. The other piece on this page is certain annual dry multures, that's m-u-l-t-u-r-e-s, but they were usually pronounced 'mooters'. I don't quite know why but it was basically dues that had to be paid to the miller, and that basically, you were obliged to pay the miller if you didn't take your crop to be ground at the mill, and that the reference here is annual dry multures which was, basically, paying in cash what you would normally have paid the miller by using his services, in which case he would normally be paid by a proportion of the meal that he milled on your behalf, was his payment for the process. <br /> <br /> We mentioned telephones before; there's also notes that the Post Office Engineering Department had tenancy for various poles and that came to eight shillings. We also have the new wonder of electricity and the local company at that period were known as the Grampian Electricity Supply Company and that they've got various payments around Tomich, Cromarty and Avoch to the estates.