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TITLE
Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (18 of 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_02_03
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF RECORDING
2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Alasdair Cameron
SOURCE
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
ASSET ID
41083
KEYWORDS
audios
farmers
farming
agriculture
built environment
villages
dwellings
houses
farms

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In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about various areas on the Black Isle including Eathie, Muirhead and Berryhill.

The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.

Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)

AC: There's a separate list of all the woodlands which are actually fairly boring unfortunately because it's just a list of numbers that relate to the plan and lists of the acres. There's mention that it also incorporates the sporting potential on that part of the property as well. There's no salmon being netted on this shore at Munlochy Bay at the moment but the whole of the fishing rights to these lands are included with the property, so that would be quite a significant part. I'm looking on to Lot 2 which is really in the Rosemarkie area and that there's an interesting photo which is wrongly captioned because it's listed as the road from Avoch towards Eathie. Well, it's, it's half right. It's the road from Eathie to Rosemarkie and it's quite distinctive because the spire of the church in Rosemarkie is very visible there. I have taken a photo of how it looks today; obviously all the trees have grown up and it's just about impossible to get the same viewpoint today.

We're talking of the areas of Eathie, Muirhead and Berryhill. The spelling of Eathie here is E-t-h-i-e, we would expect an 'A' to be put in there as 'E-a'. Eathie is known to geologists throughout the world as being the area where Hugh Miller made some of his interesting finds in relation to early ideas on geology and that often people are parking at Eathie Farm and walking down the cliff face to the beach at Eathie which also had a salmon fishing station at one time. In fact, I've just realised it's listed here - 'Ethie Salmon and Fishings leased to the Moray Firth Salmon Fisheries Company for a hundred and twelve pounds' which was quite a significant rental at that period. We're jumping along towards Cromarty, the farm of Muirhead which is probably the furthest east building on the Rosehaugh Estate and it had a telephone and all the usual things: ten-stall stable - give you an idea that it was a big farm - it's three hundred and ninety-nine acres, one rood, thirty-four poles, and that would require quite a lot of real horsepower to cope with that area.

CM: Can you tell me about roods and poles?

AC: Ooh, right, I would have to go back to my tables to work that one out for you.

CM: Oh right, but they're measurements of ...?

AC: They're land measurements and they are quite complicated because sometimes the same measurement has got different names in different parts of the country, so you get references to one rood, pole or perch and it's all the same thing.

CM: And are they particularly Scottish measurements of land, Alasdair?

AC: No, no, but you sometimes come across other obscure measurements because the measurement, although defined as an area, it's an area of production rather than a measurement and that it sometimes crops up and causes confusion because it depends on the quality of the land, how big the area is.

CM: The Muirhead Farm today, how, how is that today? Is that still a farm?

AC: It's still very much a farm and I think it's actually been sold in the last week or two.

CM: [laughs]

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Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (18 of 32)

ROSS

2010s

audios; farmers; farming; agriculture; built environment; villages; dwellings; houses; farms;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about various areas on the Black Isle including Eathie, Muirhead and Berryhill.<br /> <br /> The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.<br /> <br /> Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: There's a separate list of all the woodlands which are actually fairly boring unfortunately because it's just a list of numbers that relate to the plan and lists of the acres. There's mention that it also incorporates the sporting potential on that part of the property as well. There's no salmon being netted on this shore at Munlochy Bay at the moment but the whole of the fishing rights to these lands are included with the property, so that would be quite a significant part. I'm looking on to Lot 2 which is really in the Rosemarkie area and that there's an interesting photo which is wrongly captioned because it's listed as the road from Avoch towards Eathie. Well, it's, it's half right. It's the road from Eathie to Rosemarkie and it's quite distinctive because the spire of the church in Rosemarkie is very visible there. I have taken a photo of how it looks today; obviously all the trees have grown up and it's just about impossible to get the same viewpoint today.<br /> <br /> We're talking of the areas of Eathie, Muirhead and Berryhill. The spelling of Eathie here is E-t-h-i-e, we would expect an 'A' to be put in there as 'E-a'. Eathie is known to geologists throughout the world as being the area where Hugh Miller made some of his interesting finds in relation to early ideas on geology and that often people are parking at Eathie Farm and walking down the cliff face to the beach at Eathie which also had a salmon fishing station at one time. In fact, I've just realised it's listed here - 'Ethie Salmon and Fishings leased to the Moray Firth Salmon Fisheries Company for a hundred and twelve pounds' which was quite a significant rental at that period. We're jumping along towards Cromarty, the farm of Muirhead which is probably the furthest east building on the Rosehaugh Estate and it had a telephone and all the usual things: ten-stall stable - give you an idea that it was a big farm - it's three hundred and ninety-nine acres, one rood, thirty-four poles, and that would require quite a lot of real horsepower to cope with that area.<br /> <br /> CM: Can you tell me about roods and poles?<br /> <br /> AC: Ooh, right, I would have to go back to my tables to work that one out for you.<br /> <br /> CM: Oh right, but they're measurements of ...?<br /> <br /> AC: They're land measurements and they are quite complicated because sometimes the same measurement has got different names in different parts of the country, so you get references to one rood, pole or perch and it's all the same thing.<br /> <br /> CM: And are they particularly Scottish measurements of land, Alasdair?<br /> <br /> AC: No, no, but you sometimes come across other obscure measurements because the measurement, although defined as an area, it's an area of production rather than a measurement and that it sometimes crops up and causes confusion because it depends on the quality of the land, how big the area is.<br /> <br /> CM: The Muirhead Farm today, how, how is that today? Is that still a farm?<br /> <br /> AC: It's still very much a farm and I think it's actually been sold in the last week or two.<br /> <br /> CM: [laughs]