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TITLE
Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (23 of 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_02_08
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF RECORDING
2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Alasdair Cameron
SOURCE
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
ASSET ID
41088
KEYWORDS
audios
farmers
farming
agriculture
built environment
villages
dwellings
houses
farms
great houses

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In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about the area in and around Belmaduthy, on the Black Isle.

The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.

Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)

AC: The sort of period I'm talking about is probably from the early 1900s, up until about 1935. It's believed that Royalty came and stayed there in shooting parties in the early 1930s. It's mentioned in a book on the history of Brisbane, because plain Evan MacKenzie of Kilcoy left Belmaduthy to go out to Australia with some of the former tenants of the estate and he is regarded as one of the co-founders of the City of Brisbane and he acquired lands out there which are still known today as Kilcoy. And he was involved in sheep rearing and the production of probably barrels of mutton or lamb that were then sent by ship, to, probably back to the British Isles eventually, but he inherited the Kilcoy Estate probably about 18, 1847, 48, somewhere about that period, and that he'd to go for the estate and became involved very quickly with the Black Isle Farmers' Society and soon becomes the president. And there's interesting records of ploughing matches held at Belmaduthy Farm where he was very much involved, and they had a great time where the great and the good were entertained in Belmaduthy House, and the ploughmen who are slaving away in the field, ploughing to the best of their ability with their horses, well, a horse and a cart went round with some refreshment to them as well. So, everyone was looked after.

It must have been quite a property in its day. On the map here we can still see the extensive gardens that were on a classical layout, sadly totally overgrown now, but you can detect some of the interesting shrubs that were grown there. It had an imposing lodge which is still very much well, inhabited today on the road that came up from Munlochy. On his return as the returning conqueror comes back from his visit to Australia he is entertained by the friends of the estate in Munlochy Inn and as the carriage takes him back up the drive to Belmaduthy, it's suggested that his grateful tenants and friends discard the horses and pull the shafts themself to Belmaduthy House. There was another estate lodge, a gate lodge I suppose, known as Easter Lodge, which is marked on this map. Unfortunately it was neglected. I think the estates, sorry, the slates were partly stolen off it and the estate wouldn't sell it to anyone, so sadly it really got so far through that it was demolished probably about 25 years ago and there's a modern house on its site.

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Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (23 of 32)

ROSS

2010s

audios; farmers; farming; agriculture; built environment; villages; dwellings; houses; farms; great houses;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about the area in and around Belmaduthy, on the Black Isle.<br /> <br /> The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.<br /> <br /> Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: The sort of period I'm talking about is probably from the early 1900s, up until about 1935. It's believed that Royalty came and stayed there in shooting parties in the early 1930s. It's mentioned in a book on the history of Brisbane, because plain Evan MacKenzie of Kilcoy left Belmaduthy to go out to Australia with some of the former tenants of the estate and he is regarded as one of the co-founders of the City of Brisbane and he acquired lands out there which are still known today as Kilcoy. And he was involved in sheep rearing and the production of probably barrels of mutton or lamb that were then sent by ship, to, probably back to the British Isles eventually, but he inherited the Kilcoy Estate probably about 18, 1847, 48, somewhere about that period, and that he'd to go for the estate and became involved very quickly with the Black Isle Farmers' Society and soon becomes the president. And there's interesting records of ploughing matches held at Belmaduthy Farm where he was very much involved, and they had a great time where the great and the good were entertained in Belmaduthy House, and the ploughmen who are slaving away in the field, ploughing to the best of their ability with their horses, well, a horse and a cart went round with some refreshment to them as well. So, everyone was looked after. <br /> <br /> It must have been quite a property in its day. On the map here we can still see the extensive gardens that were on a classical layout, sadly totally overgrown now, but you can detect some of the interesting shrubs that were grown there. It had an imposing lodge which is still very much well, inhabited today on the road that came up from Munlochy. On his return as the returning conqueror comes back from his visit to Australia he is entertained by the friends of the estate in Munlochy Inn and as the carriage takes him back up the drive to Belmaduthy, it's suggested that his grateful tenants and friends discard the horses and pull the shafts themself to Belmaduthy House. There was another estate lodge, a gate lodge I suppose, known as Easter Lodge, which is marked on this map. Unfortunately it was neglected. I think the estates, sorry, the slates were partly stolen off it and the estate wouldn't sell it to anyone, so sadly it really got so far through that it was demolished probably about 25 years ago and there's a modern house on its site.