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TITLE
Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (30 of 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_04_01
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF RECORDING
2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Alasdair Cameron
SOURCE
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
ASSET ID
41095
KEYWORDS
audios
farmers
farming
agriculture
built environment
villages
dwellings
houses
farms
Second World War

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In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about the importance of Muir of Ord as a World War II military establishment, with particular reference to the Indian Mountain Artillery.

The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.

Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)

AC: I've been interested in World War Two operations because I used to go into the station at Muir of Ord and there was all these brick buildings that were obviously military but in my day were purely distribution for animal feed, for all the different manufacturing companies like Silcock's, Bibby's etcetera. But, oh, it was much later I found out that it was the hub of activity for baking bread for all the military establishments in the north and also the butchery and food stores. So, it was really the hub of operations. It's gone totally now, replaced by a housing estate. Muir of Ord was a important military base. The surrounding big houses were commandeered for a variety of purposes but also there was Indian Mountain Artillery had a base there, on what is now the Black Isle Showground, the car park section of the Black Isle Showground. And what remains there is the concrete bases of, where the mules were suitably looked after because the men had to live in tents but the mules got a hard concrete standing, and they had a tubular structure, basically scaffolding poles stuck in the concrete and a single pitched roof of asbestos cement, corrugated sheeting on top of that. And, I've learnt that from a investigation that's ongoing at Ballater where they had more surviving material than is in this area.

Now I've also come across quite a lot of reminiscences of Indian Regiments in the Black Isle and I keep on finding more references to camps. Now, there was one at, near Redcastle Station, but also in the Linnie Woods, and also half way up the drive to the farm we know as Tore Mains today. They were down at the Kessock area, but how long they were in these different locations I'm not quite sure. Certainly, the one at Tore Mains, they were there for a reasonable period of time because the local children looked forward to going to visit them at the weekend, where they would get sweets and biscuits and occasionally chocolate which was a unheard of treat. The ones in Muir of Ord even had such unknown things to the children - oranges, which didn't exist for the civilian population.

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Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (30 of 32)

ROSS

2010s

audios; farmers; farming; agriculture; built environment; villages; dwellings; houses; farms; Second World War;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about the importance of Muir of Ord as a World War II military establishment, with particular reference to the Indian Mountain Artillery.<br /> <br /> The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.<br /> <br /> Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: I've been interested in World War Two operations because I used to go into the station at Muir of Ord and there was all these brick buildings that were obviously military but in my day were purely distribution for animal feed, for all the different manufacturing companies like Silcock's, Bibby's etcetera. But, oh, it was much later I found out that it was the hub of activity for baking bread for all the military establishments in the north and also the butchery and food stores. So, it was really the hub of operations. It's gone totally now, replaced by a housing estate. Muir of Ord was a important military base. The surrounding big houses were commandeered for a variety of purposes but also there was Indian Mountain Artillery had a base there, on what is now the Black Isle Showground, the car park section of the Black Isle Showground. And what remains there is the concrete bases of, where the mules were suitably looked after because the men had to live in tents but the mules got a hard concrete standing, and they had a tubular structure, basically scaffolding poles stuck in the concrete and a single pitched roof of asbestos cement, corrugated sheeting on top of that. And, I've learnt that from a investigation that's ongoing at Ballater where they had more surviving material than is in this area.<br /> <br /> Now I've also come across quite a lot of reminiscences of Indian Regiments in the Black Isle and I keep on finding more references to camps. Now, there was one at, near Redcastle Station, but also in the Linnie Woods, and also half way up the drive to the farm we know as Tore Mains today. They were down at the Kessock area, but how long they were in these different locations I'm not quite sure. Certainly, the one at Tore Mains, they were there for a reasonable period of time because the local children looked forward to going to visit them at the weekend, where they would get sweets and biscuits and occasionally chocolate which was a unheard of treat. The ones in Muir of Ord even had such unknown things to the children - oranges, which didn't exist for the civilian population.