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TITLE
Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (31 of 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_04_02
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF RECORDING
2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Alasdair Cameron
SOURCE
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
ASSET ID
41096
KEYWORDS
audios
farmers
farming
agriculture
built environment
villages
dwellings
houses
farms
Second World War

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In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about the presence of the Indian Mountain Artillery on the Black Isle during World War II.

The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.

Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)

AC: They went on manoeuvres with teams of mules and since mules were difficult to handle, still are I believe, I've no direct experience of them, but, apparently they had an iron rod suspended from their bridle, and the rod reached almost down to ground level and the reason for that was, that if they attempted to lie down on the job, the iron road kept their head up in the air so they just wouldn't lie down. I'm not sure how that would go down with Animal Welfare today but in a military situation it was obviously quite an important way of keeping everything moving. So, all I know about them is that they exercised and went on manoeuvres on a regular basis and, some of our group in Tore have mentioned that they remember seeing them as a colourful sight, going along the roads in the area. They were certainly something that was unusual to the area and stood out amongst the, all the other military manoeuvres that were on-going in the area.

For instance, in one of the fields at Roadside Muckernich there was a big marquee erected and inside that, two large bell tents that was a headquarters for doing experimental work; waterproofing the military vehicles to see if they would survive in four feet of water, and that they used a material like plasticine trying to waterproof everything. It may actually have been plasticine because I think that was used for some things like that. And then they went to Fortrose probably, and tested them out in the water, driving them off landing craft etcetera. So, there was lots of convoys on the go there, lots of manoeuvres, various military exercises. Ian Maclennan at Muckernich told me that some of the teams were on iron rations to prepare them for going to be involved in the real war in Europe. But obviously the iron rations were not terribly generous, and that he reckoned that all their pet rabbits disappeared mysteriously when the training was going on there.

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Black Isle Heritage Memories - Alasdair Cameron (31 of 32)

ROSS

2010s

audios; farmers; farming; agriculture; built environment; villages; dwellings; houses; farms; Second World War;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

In this audio extract, Black Isle farmer Alasdair Cameron talks about the presence of the Indian Mountain Artillery on the Black Isle during World War II.<br /> <br /> The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.<br /> <br /> Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: They went on manoeuvres with teams of mules and since mules were difficult to handle, still are I believe, I've no direct experience of them, but, apparently they had an iron rod suspended from their bridle, and the rod reached almost down to ground level and the reason for that was, that if they attempted to lie down on the job, the iron road kept their head up in the air so they just wouldn't lie down. I'm not sure how that would go down with Animal Welfare today but in a military situation it was obviously quite an important way of keeping everything moving. So, all I know about them is that they exercised and went on manoeuvres on a regular basis and, some of our group in Tore have mentioned that they remember seeing them as a colourful sight, going along the roads in the area. They were certainly something that was unusual to the area and stood out amongst the, all the other military manoeuvres that were on-going in the area.<br /> <br /> For instance, in one of the fields at Roadside Muckernich there was a big marquee erected and inside that, two large bell tents that was a headquarters for doing experimental work; waterproofing the military vehicles to see if they would survive in four feet of water, and that they used a material like plasticine trying to waterproof everything. It may actually have been plasticine because I think that was used for some things like that. And then they went to Fortrose probably, and tested them out in the water, driving them off landing craft etcetera. So, there was lots of convoys on the go there, lots of manoeuvres, various military exercises. Ian Maclennan at Muckernich told me that some of the teams were on iron rations to prepare them for going to be involved in the real war in Europe. But obviously the iron rations were not terribly generous, and that he reckoned that all their pet rabbits disappeared mysteriously when the training was going on there.