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TITLE
Black Isle Heritage Memories - Hermione Protheroe (6 of 11)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_HERMI_PROTHEROE_02_04
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF RECORDING
2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Hermi Protheroe
SOURCE
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
ASSET ID
41103
KEYWORDS
audios
built environment
villages
dwellings
houses
water pumps

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In this audio extract Avoch resident, Hermione Protheroe, talks about the locals wood, shops, hotel, and water pump.

The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.

Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)

HP: And away up behind the school, and behind the church, was what they call the 'claes woodie' [the clothes wood]. Now I can't believe that they went all that distance to hang the clothes up, but it was always called the 'claes woodie' up there, and it's still there, the wood.

CM: And would they hang the clothes on the trees?

HP: No they would, make, have a line between the trees. Mind you, there's washing there so it might've been lying there. I don't know who'd've been hanging the claes buddy [?] and along from there, there was a path and it, Johnny Patience who had the bicycle shop ...

CM: And was the bicycle shop, oh, so that was ...

HP: Along here.

CM: ... along from the laundry?

HP: Uh-huh.

CM: Where, below the school or?

HP: Yes, yes, below the school. It was just off the High Street off what we call the Lazy Corner. And my aunt, that was the road going up to the Brae to the school, and my aunt and uncle who lived once at Tourielum, they lived there and, och it was there for years with the wall, a wall there - if you waited for the bus, that's where you sat on that wall - and that wall was across from the Post Office and the Chemist's shop.

CM: And there was a chemist shop as well?

HP: Oh yes.

CM: Uh-huh.

HP: It was Mr Gow, belonged to Mr Gow, or Gow that I knew in Fortrose, and he just had an assistant there; it was a small shop but you could get everything you wanted.

CM: And what was the address of that shop? That was - cos that was off the High Street again or?

HP: No, it was on the High Street beside what, I think it - Oh, it's probably made into flats now but it was an antique shop at one time, just along from what is the, and it was the Royal Hotel, the Station Hotel. I don't know what it's called now. And this chap, Kenny MacLean and his two spinster sisters ran it. It was a well-known, well-run place. And I don't think he drank, it was [laughs].

CM: And that was in the, when was that, the 1940s?

HP: '40s yes and there was the other hotel in Avoch which was across from that pump on the High Street and it was called the Central Hotel.

CM: OK.

HP: You'd see a few people in there.

CM: And the pump, I'm glad you mentioned the pump because the pump, em, was the pump ...?

HP: Mmm-hmm. The pump was just along from our house, just where the steps are, you know, going up to the Braehead, it was just there, across from the Central Hotel and the Central Hotel, there's a car park there where they have, well, when we were young were rose bushes and we made perfume, picking the rose petals and putting them in a jar of water and that was our Chanel no.5 [laughs].

CM: And the pump, was the pump in use when you were a child?

HP: Yes, because I'm sure my mouth was under it getting a drink. Yes.

CM: And, em, the, the other thing that you mentioned just earlier, the other place that you mentioned, Hermy, was the Tourielum.

HP: Tourielum.

CM: Mmm-hmm.

HP: Mmm-hmm.

CM: Can you tell us a bit about what you remember.

HP: Well again it was a great walk, just after the cemetery, the new cemetery where my brother, one of my brothers, I think he'd, I'm not sure was he stillborn? I think he was stillborn and he was the first child to be buried in the new cemetery. But we would, used to go as young ones, along Tourielum because it was a lovely walk. I don't know why we weren't afraid of the woods. Maybe because we knew there was a house at the end where my aunt and uncle lived.

CM: Because what's different now, that, it's not wooded in the same way at all.

HP: No, that's all taken down now.

CM: And, it was below the Gallow, the wood went from below the Gallow Hill, from ...

HP: Yes.

CM: ... the New Cemetery as you call it ...

HP: Yes. Mmm-hmm.

CM: ... to the house Tourielum?

HP: Yes, yes. Uh-huh.

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Black Isle Heritage Memories - Hermione Protheroe (6 of 11)

ROSS

2010s

audios; built environment; villages; dwellings; houses; water pumps;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

In this audio extract Avoch resident, Hermione Protheroe, talks about the locals wood, shops, hotel, and water pump.<br /> <br /> The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.<br /> <br /> Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> HP: And away up behind the school, and behind the church, was what they call the 'claes woodie' [the clothes wood]. Now I can't believe that they went all that distance to hang the clothes up, but it was always called the 'claes woodie' up there, and it's still there, the wood.<br /> <br /> CM: And would they hang the clothes on the trees?<br /> <br /> HP: No they would, make, have a line between the trees. Mind you, there's washing there so it might've been lying there. I don't know who'd've been hanging the claes buddy [?] and along from there, there was a path and it, Johnny Patience who had the bicycle shop ...<br /> <br /> CM: And was the bicycle shop, oh, so that was ...<br /> <br /> HP: Along here.<br /> <br /> CM: ... along from the laundry?<br /> <br /> HP: Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> CM: Where, below the school or?<br /> <br /> HP: Yes, yes, below the school. It was just off the High Street off what we call the Lazy Corner. And my aunt, that was the road going up to the Brae to the school, and my aunt and uncle who lived once at Tourielum, they lived there and, och it was there for years with the wall, a wall there - if you waited for the bus, that's where you sat on that wall - and that wall was across from the Post Office and the Chemist's shop.<br /> <br /> CM: And there was a chemist shop as well?<br /> <br /> HP: Oh yes.<br /> <br /> CM: Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> HP: It was Mr Gow, belonged to Mr Gow, or Gow that I knew in Fortrose, and he just had an assistant there; it was a small shop but you could get everything you wanted.<br /> <br /> CM: And what was the address of that shop? That was - cos that was off the High Street again or?<br /> <br /> HP: No, it was on the High Street beside what, I think it - Oh, it's probably made into flats now but it was an antique shop at one time, just along from what is the, and it was the Royal Hotel, the Station Hotel. I don't know what it's called now. And this chap, Kenny MacLean and his two spinster sisters ran it. It was a well-known, well-run place. And I don't think he drank, it was [laughs].<br /> <br /> CM: And that was in the, when was that, the 1940s?<br /> <br /> HP: '40s yes and there was the other hotel in Avoch which was across from that pump on the High Street and it was called the Central Hotel.<br /> <br /> CM: OK.<br /> <br /> HP: You'd see a few people in there.<br /> <br /> CM: And the pump, I'm glad you mentioned the pump because the pump, em, was the pump ...?<br /> <br /> HP: Mmm-hmm. The pump was just along from our house, just where the steps are, you know, going up to the Braehead, it was just there, across from the Central Hotel and the Central Hotel, there's a car park there where they have, well, when we were young were rose bushes and we made perfume, picking the rose petals and putting them in a jar of water and that was our Chanel no.5 [laughs].<br /> <br /> CM: And the pump, was the pump in use when you were a child? <br /> <br /> HP: Yes, because I'm sure my mouth was under it getting a drink. Yes.<br /> <br /> CM: And, em, the, the other thing that you mentioned just earlier, the other place that you mentioned, Hermy, was the Tourielum.<br /> <br /> HP: Tourielum.<br /> <br /> CM: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> HP: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> CM: Can you tell us a bit about what you remember.<br /> <br /> HP: Well again it was a great walk, just after the cemetery, the new cemetery where my brother, one of my brothers, I think he'd, I'm not sure was he stillborn? I think he was stillborn and he was the first child to be buried in the new cemetery. But we would, used to go as young ones, along Tourielum because it was a lovely walk. I don't know why we weren't afraid of the woods. Maybe because we knew there was a house at the end where my aunt and uncle lived.<br /> <br /> CM: Because what's different now, that, it's not wooded in the same way at all.<br /> <br /> HP: No, that's all taken down now.<br /> <br /> CM: And, it was below the Gallow, the wood went from below the Gallow Hill, from ...<br /> <br /> HP: Yes.<br /> <br /> CM: ... the New Cemetery as you call it ...<br /> <br /> HP: Yes. Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> CM: ... to the house Tourielum?<br /> <br /> HP: Yes, yes. Uh-huh.