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TITLE
Black Isle Heritage Memories - Hermione Protheroe (8 of 11)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_HERMI_PROTHEROE_03_01
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF RECORDING
2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Hermi Protheroe
SOURCE
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
ASSET ID
41104
KEYWORDS
audios
built environment
villages
dwellings
houses

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In this audio extract Avoch resident, Hermione Protheroe, talks about the Polish army stationed in the area during World War II. She also mentions some of the shops that used to trade in Avoch.

The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.

Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)

HP: And of course on a Sunday morning, we were always, anything was passing the road, and along would come the Polish army marching, singing.

[sings]

And I remember being at a party and the captain giving me a book, and I remember the title, but to this day I'm sor- I don't know what happened, 'In Desert and Wilderness'. But then my sister, she married a Polish chap who had been in Fortrose, in fact, in Avoch, the house that we bought, that was a place where the officers stayed.

CM: And what address was that, Hermy?

HP: This is, eh, well, it was called Gowan Brae when we moved up to the Braehead but of course my mother changed it to Lochaber, the home of the Camerons. But before that the army was staying there.

CM: And that was the officers' accommodation?

HP: Yes, yes.

CM: And the regular troops were on the camp?

HP: In the camp, yes.

CM: And the camp was ... What's there now, at the site where the camp was?

HP: Well, there's the Pavilion and the... Well, it was a curling pond at one time because we used to see from Lochaber the curling there, but now it's a car park.

CM: Uh-huh. In front of the ...

HP: Where the tennis courts are.

CM: And so you say, it was ... Was the curling pond after the camp had been there or ...?

HP: Yes, yes, uh-huh.

CM: So in the '50s?

HP: Yes, uh-huh, uh-huh. And the shoemakers from the army, used to go, if they wanted anything extra, go to my father and he always liked a chat and sent them through to see my mother and my sisters and that.

CM: This is how you learned the song, no?

HP: No, I learned the song by the army passing by, but we learned all the other sort of things: Good Morning - Dzien Dobry; Good Afternoon - Dobre Popoludnie; Dobranoc - Goodnight; Jak sie masz - How are you? So, I say that now to the young lads, you know, how very serious at the counter and think, 'Here's an old daft lady. How does she know Polish? [laughs]

CM: There were a lot of shops in Avoch. We've talked about some of them during that period in the '30s and the '40s but, em, is there something like thirty-six, thirty-eight, shops?

HP: Yes, uh-huh. Well, I don't remember that, I just remember the two butchers, the two shoemakers and I al-, and the bake-, two bakers actually. There was one just beside our house and that, on the High Street, that was McLennan's.

CM: And the other baker was?

HP: MacDonald's.

CM: And where were MacDonald's?

HP: In Margaret Street, the top of Margaret Street, and their bakehouse was in George Street. So they came through the closie with all their baking.

CM: And you said they would come with the baking on a tray, on a ...?
HP: Yes, yes, uh-huh. Vanilla slices were the things.

CM: And you told me, now, it wasn't just shops, of course, there was also a Coffee House, is that right?

HP: It was just a shop but why it was called the Coffee House, did they sell coffee beans? I just can't remember but I do remember them having the butter, and you got the butter, they made up the measurement of butter with the butter ...

CM: The Pats?

HP: Whatever they were called and eh ...

CM: Where was this, where was the Coffee House?

HP: That's where the Post Office is just now.

CM: And where's that, the address of the Post Office just now? Is it on the High Street?

HP: It's on the High Street, yes, nearly across from, well, Brenda Mays, the hairdressers, which is next door to Glen Coe where Joan [Joe?] was born and brought up.

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Black Isle Heritage Memories - Hermione Protheroe (8 of 11)

ROSS

2010s

audios; built environment; villages; dwellings; houses;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

In this audio extract Avoch resident, Hermione Protheroe, talks about the Polish army stationed in the area during World War II. She also mentions some of the shops that used to trade in Avoch. <br /> <br /> The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.<br /> <br /> Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> HP: And of course on a Sunday morning, we were always, anything was passing the road, and along would come the Polish army marching, singing.<br /> <br /> [sings]<br /> <br /> And I remember being at a party and the captain giving me a book, and I remember the title, but to this day I'm sor- I don't know what happened, 'In Desert and Wilderness'. But then my sister, she married a Polish chap who had been in Fortrose, in fact, in Avoch, the house that we bought, that was a place where the officers stayed.<br /> <br /> CM: And what address was that, Hermy?<br /> <br /> HP: This is, eh, well, it was called Gowan Brae when we moved up to the Braehead but of course my mother changed it to Lochaber, the home of the Camerons. But before that the army was staying there.<br /> <br /> CM: And that was the officers' accommodation?<br /> <br /> HP: Yes, yes.<br /> <br /> CM: And the regular troops were on the camp?<br /> <br /> HP: In the camp, yes.<br /> <br /> CM: And the camp was ... What's there now, at the site where the camp was?<br /> <br /> HP: Well, there's the Pavilion and the... Well, it was a curling pond at one time because we used to see from Lochaber the curling there, but now it's a car park.<br /> <br /> CM: Uh-huh. In front of the ...<br /> <br /> HP: Where the tennis courts are.<br /> <br /> CM: And so you say, it was ... Was the curling pond after the camp had been there or ...?<br /> <br /> HP: Yes, yes, uh-huh.<br /> <br /> CM: So in the '50s?<br /> <br /> HP: Yes, uh-huh, uh-huh. And the shoemakers from the army, used to go, if they wanted anything extra, go to my father and he always liked a chat and sent them through to see my mother and my sisters and that.<br /> <br /> CM: This is how you learned the song, no?<br /> <br /> HP: No, I learned the song by the army passing by, but we learned all the other sort of things: Good Morning - Dzien Dobry; Good Afternoon - Dobre Popoludnie; Dobranoc - Goodnight; Jak sie masz - How are you? So, I say that now to the young lads, you know, how very serious at the counter and think, 'Here's an old daft lady. How does she know Polish? [laughs]<br /> <br /> CM: There were a lot of shops in Avoch. We've talked about some of them during that period in the '30s and the '40s but, em, is there something like thirty-six, thirty-eight, shops?<br /> <br /> HP: Yes, uh-huh. Well, I don't remember that, I just remember the two butchers, the two shoemakers and I al-, and the bake-, two bakers actually. There was one just beside our house and that, on the High Street, that was McLennan's.<br /> <br /> CM: And the other baker was? <br /> <br /> HP: MacDonald's.<br /> <br /> CM: And where were MacDonald's?<br /> <br /> HP: In Margaret Street, the top of Margaret Street, and their bakehouse was in George Street. So they came through the closie with all their baking.<br /> <br /> CM: And you said they would come with the baking on a tray, on a ...?<br /> HP: Yes, yes, uh-huh. Vanilla slices were the things. <br /> <br /> CM: And you told me, now, it wasn't just shops, of course, there was also a Coffee House, is that right? <br /> <br /> HP: It was just a shop but why it was called the Coffee House, did they sell coffee beans? I just can't remember but I do remember them having the butter, and you got the butter, they made up the measurement of butter with the butter ...<br /> <br /> CM: The Pats?<br /> <br /> HP: Whatever they were called and eh ...<br /> <br /> CM: Where was this, where was the Coffee House?<br /> <br /> HP: That's where the Post Office is just now.<br /> <br /> CM: And where's that, the address of the Post Office just now? Is it on the High Street?<br /> <br /> HP: It's on the High Street, yes, nearly across from, well, Brenda Mays, the hairdressers, which is next door to Glen Coe where Joan [Joe?] was born and brought up.