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TITLE
Black Isle Heritage Memories - Mhairi Beaton (3 of 7)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_MHAIRI_BEATON_01_03
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF RECORDING
2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Mhairi Beaton
SOURCE
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
ASSET ID
41110
KEYWORDS
audios
built environment
villages
dwellings
houses

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In this audio extract North Kessock resident, Mhairi Beaton, talks about local roads that have disappeared, getting around by bicycle, and entertainment during World War II.

The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.

Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)

CM: So this, em, these journeys that you made on foot and cycling ...

MB: Yes.

CM: ... you would have known, of course this was before the A9, so you would've known many tracks and roadways ...

MB: Oh yes.

CM: ... that have disappeared.

MB: Disappeared, yes. Well most of the road, well the road from Kessock to Artafallie has completely disappeared.

CM: That road, em, when you drive along the A9 now we see, it's beech trees I see when I'm going along, and I've heard that there was an avenue of beech trees going at, at, em ...

MB: Oh, that's in Bogallan.

CM: Mmm-hmm.

MB: No, that road never changed. That's between Artafallie and Munclochy. No that never changed.

CM: And did you work in the Forestry in that area as well, the Bogallan area?

MB: No, no.

CM: So, you were telling me earlier about the foresters' houses, both at Craig Phadrig and at Ord ...

MB: ... and Ord Hill, yes.

CM: Can you tell me are those houses still there now?

MB: Yes. They're both still there. Well, the one on Ord Hill is, it was pretty well taken down, I think, altogether and built up; it's a beautiful house up there now. It was very nice when the Forestry was there but it's completely different now, but the one at Craig Phadrig is still the same.

CM: And at Ord Hill, that's where the shed, shed was, is that right?

MB: Where the shed was where we did our sharpening, sharpened the saws and made fire brooms.

CM: Your wet-weather work [laughs]

MB: Our wet-weather work, yes [laughs] That was it.

CM: Of course, it wasn't all work, there was dancing too.

MB: Oh aye, we didn't work all night [laughs]

CM: Will you tell me about some of the halls that you went to for dancing, and how you travelled around.

MB: Well, we travelled on our bicycles or else stayed at home, and we used to go to Tore and Munlochy, and the one, the hall in Kessock. But during the war there was the RAF were stationed in Redca- well some of the RAF were stationed in Redcastle, and they used to run whist drives and dances, and every so often they would have a Gang Show, and we cycled along the shore to that. That was very nice.

CM: Now cycling to, to Redcastle is fine but how did you get to Tore?

MB: Cycled, to Tore.

CM: Did you ever use the train at all, Mhairi?

MB: No, no, not from going from here, not ...

CM: No.

MB: ... if we went to Inverness and came back by the train ...

CM: Aah.

MB: ... we would come off at Allangrange - we never came off at Redcastle - and then walk home from there

CM: And Allangrange is making me think now about the house at Allangrange, and I know that you said the RAF were camped at Redcastle, was there anybody else at Allangrange during the war?

MB: Yes, there was the army, different army lots were in, stationed in Allangrange. And there was a camp at Artafallie but that was just an overnight, more or less an overnight stop, if they weren't sleeping under their wagons at the side of the road.

CM: Oh, because you would have seen that too?

MB: Oh yes, yes. And I think that was it, for around here anyway.

CM: So you didn't work yourself with any of the, the service men. They weren't ...?

MB: No.

CM: No?

MB: No. The prisoners of war were more or less on farms. They were never in the, well not in the Forestry around here anyway. Probably they were in places, but not here. But they did work on farms, yes.

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Black Isle Heritage Memories - Mhairi Beaton (3 of 7)

ROSS

2010s

audios; built environment; villages; dwellings; houses;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

In this audio extract North Kessock resident, Mhairi Beaton, talks about local roads that have disappeared, getting around by bicycle, and entertainment during World War II.<br /> <br /> The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.<br /> <br /> Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> CM: So this, em, these journeys that you made on foot and cycling ...<br /> <br /> MB: Yes.<br /> <br /> CM: ... you would have known, of course this was before the A9, so you would've known many tracks and roadways ...<br /> <br /> MB: Oh yes.<br /> <br /> CM: ... that have disappeared.<br /> <br /> MB: Disappeared, yes. Well most of the road, well the road from Kessock to Artafallie has completely disappeared.<br /> <br /> CM: That road, em, when you drive along the A9 now we see, it's beech trees I see when I'm going along, and I've heard that there was an avenue of beech trees going at, at, em ...<br /> <br /> MB: Oh, that's in Bogallan.<br /> <br /> CM: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> MB: No, that road never changed. That's between Artafallie and Munclochy. No that never changed.<br /> <br /> CM: And did you work in the Forestry in that area as well, the Bogallan area?<br /> <br /> MB: No, no.<br /> <br /> CM: So, you were telling me earlier about the foresters' houses, both at Craig Phadrig and at Ord ...<br /> <br /> MB: ... and Ord Hill, yes.<br /> <br /> CM: Can you tell me are those houses still there now?<br /> <br /> MB: Yes. They're both still there. Well, the one on Ord Hill is, it was pretty well taken down, I think, altogether and built up; it's a beautiful house up there now. It was very nice when the Forestry was there but it's completely different now, but the one at Craig Phadrig is still the same.<br /> <br /> CM: And at Ord Hill, that's where the shed, shed was, is that right?<br /> <br /> MB: Where the shed was where we did our sharpening, sharpened the saws and made fire brooms.<br /> <br /> CM: Your wet-weather work [laughs]<br /> <br /> MB: Our wet-weather work, yes [laughs] That was it.<br /> <br /> CM: Of course, it wasn't all work, there was dancing too.<br /> <br /> MB: Oh aye, we didn't work all night [laughs]<br /> <br /> CM: Will you tell me about some of the halls that you went to for dancing, and how you travelled around.<br /> <br /> MB: Well, we travelled on our bicycles or else stayed at home, and we used to go to Tore and Munlochy, and the one, the hall in Kessock. But during the war there was the RAF were stationed in Redca- well some of the RAF were stationed in Redcastle, and they used to run whist drives and dances, and every so often they would have a Gang Show, and we cycled along the shore to that. That was very nice. <br /> <br /> CM: Now cycling to, to Redcastle is fine but how did you get to Tore?<br /> <br /> MB: Cycled, to Tore.<br /> <br /> CM: Did you ever use the train at all, Mhairi?<br /> <br /> MB: No, no, not from going from here, not ...<br /> <br /> CM: No.<br /> <br /> MB: ... if we went to Inverness and came back by the train ...<br /> <br /> CM: Aah.<br /> <br /> MB: ... we would come off at Allangrange - we never came off at Redcastle - and then walk home from there<br /> <br /> CM: And Allangrange is making me think now about the house at Allangrange, and I know that you said the RAF were camped at Redcastle, was there anybody else at Allangrange during the war?<br /> <br /> MB: Yes, there was the army, different army lots were in, stationed in Allangrange. And there was a camp at Artafallie but that was just an overnight, more or less an overnight stop, if they weren't sleeping under their wagons at the side of the road.<br /> <br /> CM: Oh, because you would have seen that too?<br /> <br /> MB: Oh yes, yes. And I think that was it, for around here anyway.<br /> <br /> CM: So you didn't work yourself with any of the, the service men. They weren't ...?<br /> <br /> MB: No.<br /> <br /> CM: No?<br /> <br /> MB: No. The prisoners of war were more or less on farms. They were never in the, well not in the Forestry around here anyway. Probably they were in places, but not here. But they did work on farms, yes.