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TITLE
Black Isle Heritage Memories - Mhairi Beaton (4 of 7)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_MHAIRI_BEATON_01_04
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF RECORDING
2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Mhairi Beaton
SOURCE
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
ASSET ID
41111
KEYWORDS
audios
built environment
villages
dwellings
houses

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In this audio extract North Kessock resident, Mhairi Beaton, talks about local farms, meal mills and sawmills.

The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.

Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)

CM: Thinking about farms, of course, Mhairi, we're sitting here today in Marine Park ...

MB: Uh-huh.

CM: ... in North Kessock, but of course in the time that you've lived in North Kessock it would have been farmland all around?

MB: Oh it was farmland. Even this bit, the Marine Parkiie; that belonged to the Kessock Farm, right along to Charleston.

CM: And how far did Kessock Farm go in the other direction, towards Kilmuir?

MB: Along almost to Craigton, very near to Craigton.

CM: And would it have, it would have been cut by the A9?

MB: Yes, cut in half by the A9. Absolutely.

CM: So, very different landscape.

MB: Oh absolutely, quite different. You just sometimes stop and wonder, 'Now, where was this, and where was ...?' Oh now it's quite different.

CM: More houses.

MB: Oh, more houses. Well, there's this Marine Park and Mill Crescent, and, oh well now, there's another one but what is it? Marine Park and Mill Crescent. Oh, I can't remember.

CM: And Mill Crescent, of course, is making me think about the mill.

MB: Uh-huh. Yes there was a mill, a meal mill at Charleston. Eh, I think it must've been in the late 50s or early 60s that it closed down; I can't be sure but I think it would be about that time.

CM: And that was a waterwheel mill?

MB: A waterwheel, yes. And there was a one, the other one was in Munlochy, and they were both very good; both made very good oatmeal.

CM: Where did you, where did you go? Did you go to both?

MB: Both, yes, mainly in Munlochy I think but I'm not sure, again about that. But they were both very, very good.

CM: And, em, of course, you were, we were talking about the deliveries of coal to ...

MB: Oh yes, well the coal, the coal then came into Munlochy by rail and there, it was delivered, there was a man delivered it, by lorry, went round. And then they did Brora coal for a while but that didn't, Brora coal didn't last for long here.

CM: And why was that Mhairi?

MB: Oh, it wasn't very good. Some of it was, some of it was quite good but at other times it was awful; very, very smoky, black smoke.

CM: [Laughs}

MB: But, it did what it was meant to do.

CM: And that was just for, for lighting the fires at home?

MB: Yes, uh-huh.

CM: Because, of course, there, you would remember the steam engines working on ...

MB: Oh, yes.

CM: ... the threshing and ...

MB: Uh-huh.

CM: ... and the sawmills. You were ...?

MB: The sawmills - they were, oh, steam, aye, they were steam, yes.

CM: And you remembered one sawmill, you were telling me ...?

MB: Yes, at Lundie. That's above Kilmuir, right on the top of the hill above Kilmuir. That's the easiest way to tell you where it was. But it was, it was there for quite a few years, but then there was never one before or since, as far as I know. There hasn't been one since anyway, and I don't think there was one before that. But that's the only sawmill that I knew of in this area.

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Black Isle Heritage Memories - Mhairi Beaton (4 of 7)

ROSS

2010s

audios; built environment; villages; dwellings; houses;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

In this audio extract North Kessock resident, Mhairi Beaton, talks about local farms, meal mills and sawmills.<br /> <br /> The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.<br /> <br /> Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> CM: Thinking about farms, of course, Mhairi, we're sitting here today in Marine Park ...<br /> <br /> MB: Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> CM: ... in North Kessock, but of course in the time that you've lived in North Kessock it would have been farmland all around?<br /> <br /> MB: Oh it was farmland. Even this bit, the Marine Parkiie; that belonged to the Kessock Farm, right along to Charleston.<br /> <br /> CM: And how far did Kessock Farm go in the other direction, towards Kilmuir?<br /> <br /> MB: Along almost to Craigton, very near to Craigton.<br /> <br /> CM: And would it have, it would have been cut by the A9?<br /> <br /> MB: Yes, cut in half by the A9. Absolutely.<br /> <br /> CM: So, very different landscape.<br /> <br /> MB: Oh absolutely, quite different. You just sometimes stop and wonder, 'Now, where was this, and where was ...?' Oh now it's quite different.<br /> <br /> CM: More houses.<br /> <br /> MB: Oh, more houses. Well, there's this Marine Park and Mill Crescent, and, oh well now, there's another one but what is it? Marine Park and Mill Crescent. Oh, I can't remember.<br /> <br /> CM: And Mill Crescent, of course, is making me think about the mill.<br /> <br /> MB: Uh-huh. Yes there was a mill, a meal mill at Charleston. Eh, I think it must've been in the late 50s or early 60s that it closed down; I can't be sure but I think it would be about that time.<br /> <br /> CM: And that was a waterwheel mill?<br /> <br /> MB: A waterwheel, yes. And there was a one, the other one was in Munlochy, and they were both very good; both made very good oatmeal.<br /> <br /> CM: Where did you, where did you go? Did you go to both?<br /> <br /> MB: Both, yes, mainly in Munlochy I think but I'm not sure, again about that. But they were both very, very good.<br /> <br /> CM: And, em, of course, you were, we were talking about the deliveries of coal to ...<br /> <br /> MB: Oh yes, well the coal, the coal then came into Munlochy by rail and there, it was delivered, there was a man delivered it, by lorry, went round. And then they did Brora coal for a while but that didn't, Brora coal didn't last for long here.<br /> <br /> CM: And why was that Mhairi?<br /> <br /> MB: Oh, it wasn't very good. Some of it was, some of it was quite good but at other times it was awful; very, very smoky, black smoke.<br /> <br /> CM: [Laughs}<br /> <br /> MB: But, it did what it was meant to do.<br /> <br /> CM: And that was just for, for lighting the fires at home?<br /> <br /> MB: Yes, uh-huh.<br /> <br /> CM: Because, of course, there, you would remember the steam engines working on ...<br /> <br /> MB: Oh, yes.<br /> <br /> CM: ... the threshing and ...<br /> <br /> MB: Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> CM: ... and the sawmills. You were ...?<br /> <br /> MB: The sawmills - they were, oh, steam, aye, they were steam, yes.<br /> <br /> CM: And you remembered one sawmill, you were telling me ...?<br /> <br /> MB: Yes, at Lundie. That's above Kilmuir, right on the top of the hill above Kilmuir. That's the easiest way to tell you where it was. But it was, it was there for quite a few years, but then there was never one before or since, as far as I know. There hasn't been one since anyway, and I don't think there was one before that. But that's the only sawmill that I knew of in this area.