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TITLE
Chasing a naughty boy
EXTERNAL ID
CLI_CALINA_MACDONALD
DISTRICT
Skye
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Calina MacDonald
SOURCE
Clì Gàidhlig
ASSET ID
41115
KEYWORDS
audio
games
children

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Calina MacDonald gives us a vivid picture of a childhood in the north of Skye and her days at Portree High School.

CN: Bhiodh mi fhìn 's mo pheathraichean, gu h-àraid mise, bhiodh sinn a' cluich 'taighean beaga', you know; mar clann-nighean a bhiodh a' cluich 'taighean beaga', agus bhiodh tea-sets againn 's a' dèanamh a h-uile càil mar sin, le pigeilearan, dìreach cupannan 's truinnsearan a bha nam bristeadh; is càil sam bith a b' urrainn dhomh a thoirt a-mach às an taigh. (ha ha) Bhiodh sinn ga thoirt leinn suas a' bhruthach, 's bhiodh 'taighean beaga' againn. Ach an ath-dharas dhuinne, sa chroit an ath-dharas dhuinne, bha teaghlach ann a's an robh sianar ghillean. 'S mar sin bha aimhreit, bha tòrr aimhreit a' dol eadar na h-igheanan 's na gillean 's bha tòrr sabaid a' dol eadar na h-igheanan 's na gillean. 'S an latha a bha seo, thàinig fear dhe na gillean 's chuir e às dhan an taigh bheag a'amsa, bhrist e an taigh bheag agam. Uill! Ghabh mise an cuthach! Thàinig mi staigh is fhuair mi grèim air 'm maid' aig mo sheanair. Nise bha mo sheanair na sheòladair. Bha e ann an Afraga 's feumaidh gun tug e dhachaigh am maid' a bha seo: 's e eabonaidh a bh' ann 's bha e cho cruaidh ris an donas, mar a chanas 'ad. Stiall mise air a' bhalach a bha seo leis a' mhaide. 'S bhrist mi am maide! 'S chaidh e dhachaigh na rus. An ceann uair a thìde, thàinig a mhàthair gu 'n daras - gnog, gnog, gnog - 's i a' trod le mo mhàthair gu robh i a' dol a chur am poileasman às mo dhèidh 's a h-uile càil a bh' ann. Cha mhòr nach do mharbh mi an gill' aic'! (gàireachdaich). Ach cha deach e faisg orm às dèidh sin! Cha tàinig e faisg idir orm! Dh'obraich e! Aversion therapy!

The English translates as:

CM: Myself and my sisters, especially me, we'd play at 'wee houses', you know, the way girls would play 'houses', and we would have tea-sets and doing all those kinds of things, with crockery pieces, just cups and plates which were broken: anything I could take out of the house. Ha ha. We'd take them with us up the brae, and we'd play houses. But next door to us, in the croft next to ours, there was a family in which there were six boys. And so there was argument, a lot of quarrelling, between the girls and the boys and there was a lot of fighting between the girls and the boys. And this day, one of the boys came and destroyed my wee house, he broke my wee house. Well! I went mad! I came inside and grabbed my grandfather's walking stick. Now, my grandfather was a sailor. He'd been in Africa and he must have brought back this stick: it was ebony and it was as hard as the devil, as they say. I tore into this lad with the stick. And I broke the stick! He ran off home. After an hour his mother came to the door - knock, knock, knock - and she complained loudly to my mother and she was going to send the policeman after me and everything. I had almost killed her boy! (laughter) But he didn't go near me after that! He didn't come near me at all! It worked! Aversion therapy!


The extract is from 'Mas math mo chuimhne' (Reflection of the Gaels), published in 2010. This oral history project was led by Clì Gàidhlig - The Gaelic Learners' Association - and involved the recording of stories from native Gaelic speakers which may otherwise have remained unknown to the general public. The key aims were to: document living history and the richness of the language through the memories of volunteer native speakers; help combat the feelings of isolation experienced by some older fluent speakers by acknowledging and recognising the value of their local and linguistic heritage; involve and train adult learners of Gaelic to conduct the interviews; and enhance learners' access to varied vocabulary and idiomatic expression over the project period.

The book, published in Gaelic and English, has an accompanying CD which features a range of people talking informally in Gaelic about their lives and work. It was produced by Kenneth Lindsay and edited by Morag MacNeill. (You can purchase the book by following the link below.)

Clì Gàidhlig would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for their financial help with the project.

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Chasing a naughty boy

2000s

audio; games; children;

Clì Gàidhlig

Mas Math Mo Chuimhne (Reflection of the Gaels)

Calina MacDonald gives us a vivid picture of a childhood in the north of Skye and her days at Portree High School.<br /> <br /> CN: Bhiodh mi fhìn 's mo pheathraichean, gu h-àraid mise, bhiodh sinn a' cluich 'taighean beaga', you know; mar clann-nighean a bhiodh a' cluich 'taighean beaga', agus bhiodh tea-sets againn 's a' dèanamh a h-uile càil mar sin, le pigeilearan, dìreach cupannan 's truinnsearan a bha nam bristeadh; is càil sam bith a b' urrainn dhomh a thoirt a-mach às an taigh. (ha ha) Bhiodh sinn ga thoirt leinn suas a' bhruthach, 's bhiodh 'taighean beaga' againn. Ach an ath-dharas dhuinne, sa chroit an ath-dharas dhuinne, bha teaghlach ann a's an robh sianar ghillean. 'S mar sin bha aimhreit, bha tòrr aimhreit a' dol eadar na h-igheanan 's na gillean 's bha tòrr sabaid a' dol eadar na h-igheanan 's na gillean. 'S an latha a bha seo, thàinig fear dhe na gillean 's chuir e às dhan an taigh bheag a'amsa, bhrist e an taigh bheag agam. Uill! Ghabh mise an cuthach! Thàinig mi staigh is fhuair mi grèim air 'm maid' aig mo sheanair. Nise bha mo sheanair na sheòladair. Bha e ann an Afraga 's feumaidh gun tug e dhachaigh am maid' a bha seo: 's e eabonaidh a bh' ann 's bha e cho cruaidh ris an donas, mar a chanas 'ad. Stiall mise air a' bhalach a bha seo leis a' mhaide. 'S bhrist mi am maide! 'S chaidh e dhachaigh na rus. An ceann uair a thìde, thàinig a mhàthair gu 'n daras - gnog, gnog, gnog - 's i a' trod le mo mhàthair gu robh i a' dol a chur am poileasman às mo dhèidh 's a h-uile càil a bh' ann. Cha mhòr nach do mharbh mi an gill' aic'! (gàireachdaich). Ach cha deach e faisg orm às dèidh sin! Cha tàinig e faisg idir orm! Dh'obraich e! Aversion therapy!<br /> <br /> The English translates as:<br /> <br /> CM: Myself and my sisters, especially me, we'd play at 'wee houses', you know, the way girls would play 'houses', and we would have tea-sets and doing all those kinds of things, with crockery pieces, just cups and plates which were broken: anything I could take out of the house. Ha ha. We'd take them with us up the brae, and we'd play houses. But next door to us, in the croft next to ours, there was a family in which there were six boys. And so there was argument, a lot of quarrelling, between the girls and the boys and there was a lot of fighting between the girls and the boys. And this day, one of the boys came and destroyed my wee house, he broke my wee house. Well! I went mad! I came inside and grabbed my grandfather's walking stick. Now, my grandfather was a sailor. He'd been in Africa and he must have brought back this stick: it was ebony and it was as hard as the devil, as they say. I tore into this lad with the stick. And I broke the stick! He ran off home. After an hour his mother came to the door - knock, knock, knock - and she complained loudly to my mother and she was going to send the policeman after me and everything. I had almost killed her boy! (laughter) But he didn't go near me after that! He didn't come near me at all! It worked! Aversion therapy! <br /> <br /> <br /> The extract is from 'Mas math mo chuimhne' (Reflection of the Gaels), published in 2010. This oral history project was led by Clì Gàidhlig - The Gaelic Learners' Association - and involved the recording of stories from native Gaelic speakers which may otherwise have remained unknown to the general public. The key aims were to: document living history and the richness of the language through the memories of volunteer native speakers; help combat the feelings of isolation experienced by some older fluent speakers by acknowledging and recognising the value of their local and linguistic heritage; involve and train adult learners of Gaelic to conduct the interviews; and enhance learners' access to varied vocabulary and idiomatic expression over the project period.<br /> <br /> The book, published in Gaelic and English, has an accompanying CD which features a range of people talking informally in Gaelic about their lives and work. It was produced by Kenneth Lindsay and edited by Morag MacNeill. (You can purchase the book by following the link below.)<br /> <br /> Clì Gàidhlig would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for their financial help with the project.