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TITLE
Leaving Soay
EXTERNAL ID
CLI_CALUM_CAMERON
PLACENAME
Soay
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Bracadale
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Calum Cameron
SOURCE
Clì Gàidhlig
ASSET ID
41116
KEYWORDS
audio
funerals
islands

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Calum Cameron on the last days on Soay.

CC: Mar sin, innsidh mi sin dhut. Sin agad aon dhe na h-adhbharan a dh'iarr muinntir Shòdhaigh fhaighinn air falbh, a chionn 's bha daoine a' fàs aosta, ['s e] sin a' chiad rud, agus cha robh iad cho comasach 's a bha iad. Cha robh iad cho comasach ri daoin' òg, agus cha robh cladh ann an Sòdhaigh. Nuair a bha bàs anns a' bhaile uair sam bith, dh'fheumadh a' chorp a dhol a dh'Aoineart, a's an Eilean Sgitheanach, agus bha sin faisg air dà uair a thìde air falbh. Agus nam biodh droch latha no droch shìde ann, droch aimsir, 's dòcha gum biodh iad seachdain a' feitheamh cothrom fhaighinn dhan a' chladh. Agus bha sin, uill, bha sin a' cur cùram air daoine agus tha mi 'tuigsinn sin. Agus feumaidh sinn cuimhneachadh, anns an t-seann aimsir cha robh anam beò a' fuireach ann an Sòdhaigh. Bha Sòdhaigh falamh ceudan bliadhna mus tàinig na Fuadaichean, oir 's e na Fuadaichean a chuir daoine a Shòdhaigh, coltach ri iomadach eilean eile. Tha fhios a'm air a sin.

The English translates as:

CC: Therefore I'll tell you that. That was one of the reasons the people of Soay wanted to get away, because the people were growing old, that's the first thing, and they weren't as able as they had been. They weren't as able as young people, and there was no graveyard on Soay. Whenever there was a death in the township, the corpse had to go to Eynort in Skye and that was nearly two hours away. And if there was a bad day or bad weather, a bad spell, perhaps they would wait for a week for an opportunity to get to the graveyard. And that made, well, that made people concerned and I can understand that. And we must remember that in the old days there wasn't a living soul on Soay. Soay was deserted for hundreds of years before the Clearances came, for it was the Clearances that put people on Soay, like many other islands. I know about that.

The extract is from 'Mas math mo chuimhne' (Reflection of the Gaels), published in 2010. This oral history project was led by Clì Gàidhlig - The Gaelic Learners' Association - and involved the recording of stories from native Gaelic speakers which may otherwise have remained unknown to the general public. The key aims were to: document living history and the richness of the language through the memories of volunteer native speakers; help combat the feelings of isolation experienced by some older fluent speakers by acknowledging and recognising the value of their local and linguistic heritage; involve and train adult learners of Gaelic to conduct the interviews; and enhance learners' access to varied vocabulary and idiomatic expression over the project period.

The book, published in Gaelic and English, has an accompanying CD which features a range of people talking informally in Gaelic about their lives and work. It was produced by Kenneth Lindsay and edited by Morag MacNeill. (You can purchase the book by following the link below.)

Clì Gàidhlig would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for their financial help with the project.

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Leaving Soay

INVERNESS: Bracadale

2000s

audio; funerals; islands

Clì Gàidhlig

Mas Math Mo Chuimhne (Reflection of the Gaels)

Calum Cameron on the last days on Soay.<br /> <br /> CC: Mar sin, innsidh mi sin dhut. Sin agad aon dhe na h-adhbharan a dh'iarr muinntir Shòdhaigh fhaighinn air falbh, a chionn 's bha daoine a' fàs aosta, ['s e] sin a' chiad rud, agus cha robh iad cho comasach 's a bha iad. Cha robh iad cho comasach ri daoin' òg, agus cha robh cladh ann an Sòdhaigh. Nuair a bha bàs anns a' bhaile uair sam bith, dh'fheumadh a' chorp a dhol a dh'Aoineart, a's an Eilean Sgitheanach, agus bha sin faisg air dà uair a thìde air falbh. Agus nam biodh droch latha no droch shìde ann, droch aimsir, 's dòcha gum biodh iad seachdain a' feitheamh cothrom fhaighinn dhan a' chladh. Agus bha sin, uill, bha sin a' cur cùram air daoine agus tha mi 'tuigsinn sin. Agus feumaidh sinn cuimhneachadh, anns an t-seann aimsir cha robh anam beò a' fuireach ann an Sòdhaigh. Bha Sòdhaigh falamh ceudan bliadhna mus tàinig na Fuadaichean, oir 's e na Fuadaichean a chuir daoine a Shòdhaigh, coltach ri iomadach eilean eile. Tha fhios a'm air a sin.<br /> <br /> The English translates as:<br /> <br /> CC: Therefore I'll tell you that. That was one of the reasons the people of Soay wanted to get away, because the people were growing old, that's the first thing, and they weren't as able as they had been. They weren't as able as young people, and there was no graveyard on Soay. Whenever there was a death in the township, the corpse had to go to Eynort in Skye and that was nearly two hours away. And if there was a bad day or bad weather, a bad spell, perhaps they would wait for a week for an opportunity to get to the graveyard. And that made, well, that made people concerned and I can understand that. And we must remember that in the old days there wasn't a living soul on Soay. Soay was deserted for hundreds of years before the Clearances came, for it was the Clearances that put people on Soay, like many other islands. I know about that.<br /> <br /> The extract is from 'Mas math mo chuimhne' (Reflection of the Gaels), published in 2010. This oral history project was led by Clì Gàidhlig - The Gaelic Learners' Association - and involved the recording of stories from native Gaelic speakers which may otherwise have remained unknown to the general public. The key aims were to: document living history and the richness of the language through the memories of volunteer native speakers; help combat the feelings of isolation experienced by some older fluent speakers by acknowledging and recognising the value of their local and linguistic heritage; involve and train adult learners of Gaelic to conduct the interviews; and enhance learners' access to varied vocabulary and idiomatic expression over the project period.<br /> <br /> The book, published in Gaelic and English, has an accompanying CD which features a range of people talking informally in Gaelic about their lives and work. It was produced by Kenneth Lindsay and edited by Morag MacNeill. (You can purchase the book by following the link below.)<br /> <br /> Clì Gàidhlig would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for their financial help with the project.