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TITLE
Gaelic in School
EXTERNAL ID
CLI_CATRIONA_MACKINNON
PLACENAME
Eriskay
DISTRICT
South Uist
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: South Uist
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Catriona MacKinnon
SOURCE
Clì Gàidhlig
ASSET ID
41117
KEYWORDS
audio
children
languages

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Catriona MacKinnon talks about her childhood in Eriskay and Fort William. Andrea Ridley asked the questions.

CN: Cha robh Gàidhlig idir aig a' bhan-sgoilear a bh' agamsa is cha robh Beurla agamsa. Nuair a chaidh mi dhan sgoil an toiseach 's e glè bheag, glè bheag de Bheurla a bh' againn, a bh' aig duine againn agus cha robh Gàidhlig aice. Chan eil fhios agamsa ciamar a - ciamar a dh'ionnsaich sinn rud sam bith. Ach tha cuimhn' agam gum biodh dealbhannan aice is bha - fhios agad, dealbhannan aice air - dè a' Bheurla (tha Catrìona a' ciallachadh a' Ghàidhlig) a th' air Nursery Rhymes? Cha robh sinn ach gan gabhail mar gum biodh pitheidean: 'Pat-a-Cake, Pat-a-Cake, Bake-a-Sman'. Cha robh sìon a dh'fhios againn dè bha sinn ag ràdh!

AR: Dè seòrsa Beurla a tha sin? (gàireachdainn) - Pat a Cake!

CN: Agus, mar sin chaidh 'g atharrais air an tidsear - agus bha - Tha cuimhn' agam gu robh dealbh aice 'The cow jumped over the moon', is bha mise a' smaoineachadh nach robh i glic, ma bha ise a' creidsinn gum biodh bò a' gearradh leum seachad air a' ghealaich, bha mi a' smaoineachadh nach robh i glic!

Agus, tha cuimhn' a'm gu - gun robh, bheil fhios agad, bha trì - trì seòmraichean san sgoil. Bhiodh trì clasaichean mar bu trice anns a h-uile seòmar. Agus tha mi a' smaoineachadh gur e trì - dà bhan-sgoilear agus maighstir-sgoile. 'S e am maighstir-sgoile aig an robh an fheadhainn a bu shine is a b' àirde agus cha robh sinn - cha tug iad dhuinn Gàidhlig idir. Cha robh - cha chuala sinn òrain Ghàidhlig, cha robh iad gan teagasg dhuinn idir. Cha chuala sinn riamh - um - a bheil fhios agad air - 'Gràdh Geal mo Chrìdh - Eriskay Love Lilt', cha chuala sinn riamh e. Ach dh'ionnsaich sinn 'Do You Ken John Peel?'!

The English translates as:

CM: My teacher didn't have any Gaelic at all and I didn't have any English. When I first went to school, it was very, very little English we had, any of us, and she had no Gaelic. I don't know how - how we learned anything. But I remember she would have pictures and there was - you know - pictures for - what's the English (she meant 'Gaelic') for Nursery Rhymes? We just recited them parrot-fashion: 'Pat-a-Cake, Pat-a-Cake, Bake-a- Sman.' We had no idea what we were saying.

AR: What kind of English is that - ? (laughing) - Pat-a-Cake!

CM: And so we were just mimicking the teacher - and there was - I remember she had a picture: 'The Cow Jumped Over the Moon', and I thought she wasn't sensible if she believed a cow would jump over the moon, I thought she wasn't wise!

And I remember - there were, you know, there were three - three rooms in the school. There were usually three classes in each room. I think it was three - two female teachers and a headmaster. It was the headmaster who took the older and more advanced ones and we weren't - they didn't give us Gaelic at all. We didn't have - hear Gaelic songs, they weren't taught to us at all. We never heard - um - do you know it - 'Gràdh Geal Mo Chrìdh' - 'The Eriskay Love Lilt', we never heard it. But we learned 'Do You Ken John Peel?'!

The extract is from 'Mas math mo chuimhne' (Reflection of the Gaels), published in 2010. This oral history project was led by Clì Gàidhlig - The Gaelic Learners' Association - and involved the recording of stories from native Gaelic speakers which may otherwise have remained unknown to the general public. The key aims were to: document living history and the richness of the language through the memories of volunteer native speakers; help combat the feelings of isolation experienced by some older fluent speakers by acknowledging and recognising the value of their local and linguistic heritage; involve and train adult learners of Gaelic to conduct the interviews; and enhance learners' access to varied vocabulary and idiomatic expression over the project period.

The book, published in Gaelic and English, has an accompanying CD which features a range of people talking informally in Gaelic about their lives and work. It was produced by Kenneth Lindsay and edited by Morag MacNeill. (You can purchase the book by following the link below.)

Clì Gàidhlig would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for their financial help with the project.

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Gaelic in School

INVERNESS: South Uist

2000s

audio; children; languages;

Clì Gàidhlig

Mas Math Mo Chuimhne (Reflection of the Gaels)

Catriona MacKinnon talks about her childhood in Eriskay and Fort William. Andrea Ridley asked the questions.<br /> <br /> CN: Cha robh Gàidhlig idir aig a' bhan-sgoilear a bh' agamsa is cha robh Beurla agamsa. Nuair a chaidh mi dhan sgoil an toiseach 's e glè bheag, glè bheag de Bheurla a bh' againn, a bh' aig duine againn agus cha robh Gàidhlig aice. Chan eil fhios agamsa ciamar a - ciamar a dh'ionnsaich sinn rud sam bith. Ach tha cuimhn' agam gum biodh dealbhannan aice is bha - fhios agad, dealbhannan aice air - dè a' Bheurla (tha Catrìona a' ciallachadh a' Ghàidhlig) a th' air Nursery Rhymes? Cha robh sinn ach gan gabhail mar gum biodh pitheidean: 'Pat-a-Cake, Pat-a-Cake, Bake-a-Sman'. Cha robh sìon a dh'fhios againn dè bha sinn ag ràdh!<br /> <br /> AR: Dè seòrsa Beurla a tha sin? (gàireachdainn) - Pat a Cake!<br /> <br /> CN: Agus, mar sin chaidh 'g atharrais air an tidsear - agus bha - Tha cuimhn' agam gu robh dealbh aice 'The cow jumped over the moon', is bha mise a' smaoineachadh nach robh i glic, ma bha ise a' creidsinn gum biodh bò a' gearradh leum seachad air a' ghealaich, bha mi a' smaoineachadh nach robh i glic!<br /> <br /> Agus, tha cuimhn' a'm gu - gun robh, bheil fhios agad, bha trì - trì seòmraichean san sgoil. Bhiodh trì clasaichean mar bu trice anns a h-uile seòmar. Agus tha mi a' smaoineachadh gur e trì - dà bhan-sgoilear agus maighstir-sgoile. 'S e am maighstir-sgoile aig an robh an fheadhainn a bu shine is a b' àirde agus cha robh sinn - cha tug iad dhuinn Gàidhlig idir. Cha robh - cha chuala sinn òrain Ghàidhlig, cha robh iad gan teagasg dhuinn idir. Cha chuala sinn riamh - um - a bheil fhios agad air - 'Gràdh Geal mo Chrìdh - Eriskay Love Lilt', cha chuala sinn riamh e. Ach dh'ionnsaich sinn 'Do You Ken John Peel?'!<br /> <br /> The English translates as:<br /> <br /> CM: My teacher didn't have any Gaelic at all and I didn't have any English. When I first went to school, it was very, very little English we had, any of us, and she had no Gaelic. I don't know how - how we learned anything. But I remember she would have pictures and there was - you know - pictures for - what's the English (she meant 'Gaelic') for Nursery Rhymes? We just recited them parrot-fashion: 'Pat-a-Cake, Pat-a-Cake, Bake-a- Sman.' We had no idea what we were saying.<br /> <br /> AR: What kind of English is that - ? (laughing) - Pat-a-Cake!<br /> <br /> CM: And so we were just mimicking the teacher - and there was - I remember she had a picture: 'The Cow Jumped Over the Moon', and I thought she wasn't sensible if she believed a cow would jump over the moon, I thought she wasn't wise!<br /> <br /> And I remember - there were, you know, there were three - three rooms in the school. There were usually three classes in each room. I think it was three - two female teachers and a headmaster. It was the headmaster who took the older and more advanced ones and we weren't - they didn't give us Gaelic at all. We didn't have - hear Gaelic songs, they weren't taught to us at all. We never heard - um - do you know it - 'Gràdh Geal Mo Chrìdh' - 'The Eriskay Love Lilt', we never heard it. But we learned 'Do You Ken John Peel?'! <br /> <br /> The extract is from 'Mas math mo chuimhne' (Reflection of the Gaels), published in 2010. This oral history project was led by Clì Gàidhlig - The Gaelic Learners' Association - and involved the recording of stories from native Gaelic speakers which may otherwise have remained unknown to the general public. The key aims were to: document living history and the richness of the language through the memories of volunteer native speakers; help combat the feelings of isolation experienced by some older fluent speakers by acknowledging and recognising the value of their local and linguistic heritage; involve and train adult learners of Gaelic to conduct the interviews; and enhance learners' access to varied vocabulary and idiomatic expression over the project period.<br /> <br /> The book, published in Gaelic and English, has an accompanying CD which features a range of people talking informally in Gaelic about their lives and work. It was produced by Kenneth Lindsay and edited by Morag MacNeill. (You can purchase the book by following the link below.)<br /> <br /> Clì Gàidhlig would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for their financial help with the project.