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TITLE
A Gairloch Storyteller
EXTERNAL ID
CLI_HECTOR-MACKENZIE
PLACENAME
Gairloch
DISTRICT
Gairloch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Gairloch
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Hector MacKenzie
SOURCE
Clì Gàidhlig
ASSET ID
41122
KEYWORDS
audio
stories

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Hector MacKenzie remembers an old storyteller from his boyhood in Gairloch.

EM: Bha againn ri dhol airson - airson a' bhainne nuair a bha a' bhò seasg, tha fhios agad, agus bha fear ann a sin 's bha e uabhasach math air innse stòiridheannan agus - chan e rud foirmeil idir a bh' ann, ach bha thu a' dol a-steach is bha thu - 's dh'fhaodadh gur ann air na 'MacFlannels' air an rèidio no air cuspair Gàidhlig air choreigin no air bòcain no air - 's e dìreach dòigh meanmnach, inntinneach a bh' aige air sgeulachdan innse. 'S bhiodh pìob tombac' aige 's bhiodh e - bha pìob, mar gum b' e, rudeigin a bha 'cur ris a' stòiridh a bh' aige agus, nuair a bhiodh e 'tighinn dha na stòir - mar gum b' e, àirde na sgeulachd, bhiodh e 'stad, agus thòisicheadh e air tombaca a mheilleadh mar seo, agus bha sinn a' fuireach airson na' taibhsean, no na bòcain, no na MacFlannels no brith dè bh' ann, agus a-rèiste thòisicheadh e a-rithist. Bha e dìreach - bha e gu nàdarrach mar sin, 'l fhios agad. Tha cuimhn a'm air a' bhodach sin.

The English translates as:

HM: We had to go for the milk when the cow was dry, you know, and there was a man there who was really good at telling stories and - it wasn't anything formal at all, but you went in and you were - and maybe it would be about The MacFlannels on the radio, or on some Gaelic subject or ghosts or on - it was just the imaginative, interesting way he had of telling stories. And he would have a pipe of tobacco and he would be - the pipe was like something which had a part to play in his story and, when he was getting to what you would call the climax of the story, he would stop, and he would start rubbing the tobacco like this, and we were waiting for the ghosts, the hobgoblins, or The MacFlannels or whatever it was, and then he would start again. It was just - he was naturally like that, you know. I remember that old fellow.


The extract is from 'Mas math mo chuimhne' (Reflection of the Gaels), published in 2010. This oral history project was led by Clì Gàidhlig - The Gaelic Learners' Association - and involved the recording of stories from native Gaelic speakers which may otherwise have remained unknown to the general public. The key aims were to: document living history and the richness of the language through the memories of volunteer native speakers; help combat the feelings of isolation experienced by some older fluent speakers by acknowledging and recognising the value of their local and linguistic heritage; involve and train adult learners of Gaelic to conduct the interviews; and enhance learners' access to varied vocabulary and idiomatic expression over the project period.

The book, published in Gaelic and English, has an accompanying CD which features a range of people talking informally in Gaelic about their lives and work. It was produced by Kenneth Lindsay and edited by Morag MacNeill. (You can purchase the book by following the link below.)

Clì Gàidhlig would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for their financial help with the project.

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A Gairloch Storyteller

ROSS: Gairloch

2000s

audio; stories;

Clì Gàidhlig

Mas Math Mo Chuimhne (Reflection of the Gaels)

Hector MacKenzie remembers an old storyteller from his boyhood in Gairloch.<br /> <br /> EM: Bha againn ri dhol airson - airson a' bhainne nuair a bha a' bhò seasg, tha fhios agad, agus bha fear ann a sin 's bha e uabhasach math air innse stòiridheannan agus - chan e rud foirmeil idir a bh' ann, ach bha thu a' dol a-steach is bha thu - 's dh'fhaodadh gur ann air na 'MacFlannels' air an rèidio no air cuspair Gàidhlig air choreigin no air bòcain no air - 's e dìreach dòigh meanmnach, inntinneach a bh' aige air sgeulachdan innse. 'S bhiodh pìob tombac' aige 's bhiodh e - bha pìob, mar gum b' e, rudeigin a bha 'cur ris a' stòiridh a bh' aige agus, nuair a bhiodh e 'tighinn dha na stòir - mar gum b' e, àirde na sgeulachd, bhiodh e 'stad, agus thòisicheadh e air tombaca a mheilleadh mar seo, agus bha sinn a' fuireach airson na' taibhsean, no na bòcain, no na MacFlannels no brith dè bh' ann, agus a-rèiste thòisicheadh e a-rithist. Bha e dìreach - bha e gu nàdarrach mar sin, 'l fhios agad. Tha cuimhn a'm air a' bhodach sin.<br /> <br /> The English translates as:<br /> <br /> HM: We had to go for the milk when the cow was dry, you know, and there was a man there who was really good at telling stories and - it wasn't anything formal at all, but you went in and you were - and maybe it would be about The MacFlannels on the radio, or on some Gaelic subject or ghosts or on - it was just the imaginative, interesting way he had of telling stories. And he would have a pipe of tobacco and he would be - the pipe was like something which had a part to play in his story and, when he was getting to what you would call the climax of the story, he would stop, and he would start rubbing the tobacco like this, and we were waiting for the ghosts, the hobgoblins, or The MacFlannels or whatever it was, and then he would start again. It was just - he was naturally like that, you know. I remember that old fellow. <br /> <br /> <br /> The extract is from 'Mas math mo chuimhne' (Reflection of the Gaels), published in 2010. This oral history project was led by Clì Gàidhlig - The Gaelic Learners' Association - and involved the recording of stories from native Gaelic speakers which may otherwise have remained unknown to the general public. The key aims were to: document living history and the richness of the language through the memories of volunteer native speakers; help combat the feelings of isolation experienced by some older fluent speakers by acknowledging and recognising the value of their local and linguistic heritage; involve and train adult learners of Gaelic to conduct the interviews; and enhance learners' access to varied vocabulary and idiomatic expression over the project period.<br /> <br /> The book, published in Gaelic and English, has an accompanying CD which features a range of people talking informally in Gaelic about their lives and work. It was produced by Kenneth Lindsay and edited by Morag MacNeill. (You can purchase the book by following the link below.)<br /> <br /> Clì Gàidhlig would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for their financial help with the project.