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TITLE
Childhood in Edinburgh
EXTERNAL ID
CLI_MEG_BATEMAN
PLACENAME
Edinburgh
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Meg Bateman
SOURCE
Clì Gàidhlig
ASSET ID
41123
KEYWORDS
audio
children

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Poet Meg Bateman, born in Edinburgh in 1959, describes her earliest memories.

MB: Tha cuimhn' agam mo phiuthar a bhith 'tighinn dhachaigh 's mi bhith ga cumail nam uchd. Tha cuimhn'... uill, tha cuimhn' agam air saorsa: tha mi 'n dùil gur e seo a' chiad chuimhn' agam. Nuair a bha sinn a' fuireach faisg air Roslin, bha sinn a-muigh san dùthaich agus tha cuimhn' agam a bhith a' sreap air geata, 'dol thairis air geata, agus bha cead agam 'son a' chiad turas dol a-mach dhan achadh seo. Agus cha b' urrainn dhomh ... tha cuimhn' agam a bhith nam sheasamh air a' gheata gun a bhith 'creidsinn gu robh de chead agam, de shaorsa agam a bhith a' coiseachd tron achadh seo, agus 's e cuimhne gu math tràth a tha sin. Agus tha cuimhn' agam cuideachd, bha mi ag adhradh mo phiuthar, mo phiuthar as sine agus nuair a chaidh ise dhan sgoil - bha ise trì bliadhna nas sine na mise - is bha mise gu mòr airson a bhith 'dol dhan sgoil cuideachd. Is bha tunic oirre, is bha mise gu mòr airson tunic a chur ormsa cuideachd. Agus mar sin, rinn mi caraid mac-meanmnach agus 's e 'Tunica' an t-ainm a bh' oirre. (gàireachdaich) Agus bhiodh 'Tunica' a' dol a-mach dhan achadh seo thairis air a' gheata, còmhla rium.

The English translates as:

MB: I remember my sister would come home and I'd hold her in my lap. I remember ... well, I remember freedom: I suppose that this was my first memory. When we stayed near Roslin, we were out in the country and I recall climbing on to a gate, going over the gate and I was allowed for the first time to go out into this field. And I couldn't ... I remember I was standing on the gate, unable to believe I had so much permission, so much freedom to be walking through this field, and that's a very early memory. But I remember also, I worshipped my sister, my oldest sister, and when she went to school - she was three years older than me - and I really wanted to go to school too. And she had a tunic on, and I really wanted to have a tunic on as well. And so I made up an imaginary friend and she was called 'Tunica'! (laughter). And Tunica used to go out to this field, over the gate, with me.


The extract is from 'Mas math mo chuimhne' (Reflection of the Gaels), published in 2010. This oral history project was led by Clì Gàidhlig - The Gaelic Learners' Association - and involved the recording of stories from native Gaelic speakers which may otherwise have remained unknown to the general public. The key aims were to: document living history and the richness of the language through the memories of volunteer native speakers; help combat the feelings of isolation experienced by some older fluent speakers by acknowledging and recognising the value of their local and linguistic heritage; involve and train adult learners of Gaelic to conduct the interviews; and enhance learners' access to varied vocabulary and idiomatic expression over the project period.

The book, published in Gaelic and English, has an accompanying CD which features a range of people talking informally in Gaelic about their lives and work. It was produced by Kenneth Lindsay and edited by Morag MacNeill. (You can purchase the book by following the link below.)

Clì Gàidhlig would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for their financial help with the project.

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Childhood in Edinburgh

2000s

audio; children

Clì Gàidhlig

Mas Math Mo Chuimhne (Reflection of the Gaels)

Poet Meg Bateman, born in Edinburgh in 1959, describes her earliest memories.<br /> <br /> MB: Tha cuimhn' agam mo phiuthar a bhith 'tighinn dhachaigh 's mi bhith ga cumail nam uchd. Tha cuimhn'... uill, tha cuimhn' agam air saorsa: tha mi 'n dùil gur e seo a' chiad chuimhn' agam. Nuair a bha sinn a' fuireach faisg air Roslin, bha sinn a-muigh san dùthaich agus tha cuimhn' agam a bhith a' sreap air geata, 'dol thairis air geata, agus bha cead agam 'son a' chiad turas dol a-mach dhan achadh seo. Agus cha b' urrainn dhomh ... tha cuimhn' agam a bhith nam sheasamh air a' gheata gun a bhith 'creidsinn gu robh de chead agam, de shaorsa agam a bhith a' coiseachd tron achadh seo, agus 's e cuimhne gu math tràth a tha sin. Agus tha cuimhn' agam cuideachd, bha mi ag adhradh mo phiuthar, mo phiuthar as sine agus nuair a chaidh ise dhan sgoil - bha ise trì bliadhna nas sine na mise - is bha mise gu mòr airson a bhith 'dol dhan sgoil cuideachd. Is bha tunic oirre, is bha mise gu mòr airson tunic a chur ormsa cuideachd. Agus mar sin, rinn mi caraid mac-meanmnach agus 's e 'Tunica' an t-ainm a bh' oirre. (gàireachdaich) Agus bhiodh 'Tunica' a' dol a-mach dhan achadh seo thairis air a' gheata, còmhla rium.<br /> <br /> The English translates as:<br /> <br /> MB: I remember my sister would come home and I'd hold her in my lap. I remember ... well, I remember freedom: I suppose that this was my first memory. When we stayed near Roslin, we were out in the country and I recall climbing on to a gate, going over the gate and I was allowed for the first time to go out into this field. And I couldn't ... I remember I was standing on the gate, unable to believe I had so much permission, so much freedom to be walking through this field, and that's a very early memory. But I remember also, I worshipped my sister, my oldest sister, and when she went to school - she was three years older than me - and I really wanted to go to school too. And she had a tunic on, and I really wanted to have a tunic on as well. And so I made up an imaginary friend and she was called 'Tunica'! (laughter). And Tunica used to go out to this field, over the gate, with me. <br /> <br /> <br /> The extract is from 'Mas math mo chuimhne' (Reflection of the Gaels), published in 2010. This oral history project was led by Clì Gàidhlig - The Gaelic Learners' Association - and involved the recording of stories from native Gaelic speakers which may otherwise have remained unknown to the general public. The key aims were to: document living history and the richness of the language through the memories of volunteer native speakers; help combat the feelings of isolation experienced by some older fluent speakers by acknowledging and recognising the value of their local and linguistic heritage; involve and train adult learners of Gaelic to conduct the interviews; and enhance learners' access to varied vocabulary and idiomatic expression over the project period.<br /> <br /> The book, published in Gaelic and English, has an accompanying CD which features a range of people talking informally in Gaelic about their lives and work. It was produced by Kenneth Lindsay and edited by Morag MacNeill. (You can purchase the book by following the link below.)<br /> <br /> Clì Gàidhlig would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for their financial help with the project.