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TITLE
Donald Maclean talks about the Berlin Wall (1 of 3)
EXTERNAL ID
CLI_Z_DONALD_MACLEAN_01
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Donald Maclean
SOURCE
Clì Gàidhlig
ASSET ID
41124
KEYWORDS
audio
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
wars

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In this audio extract Donald Maclean talks about his experiences of the Berlin Wall.

'Uill...nuair a chaidh mi a Bherlin - 's ann ann an naoi ceud deug trì fichead - agus, an ath-bhliadhn', anns an Lùnastal, bliadhna an dèidh sin, chaidh a bhalla a thogail. So, bha mi ann a sin, 's chunnaic mi a' bhalla nuair a chaidh e thogail. Bha mi...'s e Didòmhnaich a bh' ann, agus cha robh fhios aig duine sam bith dè bha a' dol a thachairt.

Sa mhadainn, bha mise a' dol sìos fhaicinn dè bha dol ann am Berlin fhèin 's chur mi orm dìreach èideadh sìobhalta. Chaidh mi air an trèana beag, fo thalamh - an 'underground': 'u-bahn' a bha aca air 's chaidh mi gu àite ris an can 'ad - far an robh gàrradh nam beathaichean, no 'zoological garden'. Agus, nuair a thàinig mi a-mach às an trèana, bha feadhainn a' reic pàipearan-naidheachd sònraichte, ag ràdh gu robh tancaichean nan Ruiseanach dìreach aig a' chrìoch, far an robh Earrann Ruiseanach agus an Earrann Bhreatannach a' tighinn ri chèile. Agus, bha mi a' faicinn mòran de shluagh a' coiseachd dhan an àite sin, agus lean mi 'ad. Agus bha sin dìreach faisg air an 'Reichstag' agus dìreach - chan eil fhios 'am cia mheud slat - air falbh bhon a' Gheata 'Brandenburg', agus bha an Geata 'Brandenburg' air an taobh eile agus, ann an sin, bha na clachairean ag obair air a' bhalla agus le saighdearan bhon Gearmailt an Ear le gunnaichean, dìreach sealltainn orra gu geur, agus tha iadsan a' cur suas a' bhalla. Ach, cha do rinn sinn dad. Leig sinn leotha a' bhalla a thogail. Bha mòran mìltean de Ghearmailtich a' feuchainn ri fhaighinn air falbh aig an àm sin.'

The English translates as:

'When I went to Berlin - that was in nineteen-sixty, sixty itself - and, the next year, in, in August, the year after that, the wall was built. So, I was there. I saw the wall being built. I was, it was a Sunday, and nobody knew what was going to happen.

'In the morning I thought that I would go down to see what was happening in Berlin itself and I just put on my civilian clothes. I went on the small train, underground - the unter, 'u-bahn' they called it, and I went to a place called - where the animal garden was, or the Zoological Garden. And, when I came out of the train, some folk were selling newspapers, special edition newspapers, papers saying there were Russian tanks just at the border where the Section, the Russian Section and the British Section joined. And I saw lots of people walking to that area and I followed them. And that was just near the Reichstag and just - I don't know how many yards away, from the Brandenburg Gate, and the Brandenburg Gate was on the other side and there, the builders were working on the wall, and soldiers from East Germany were there, with guns, just watching them keenly, and they were putting up the wall. But we didn't say anything. We left them to build the wall. There were many thousands of Germans trying to get away at that time.

The extract is from 'Mas math mo chuimhne' (Reflection of the Gaels), published in 2010. This oral history project was led by Clì Gàidhlig - The Gaelic Learners' Association - and involved the recording of stories from native Gaelic speakers which may otherwise have remained unknown to the general public. The key aims were to: document living history and the richness of the language through the memories of volunteer native speakers; help combat the feelings of isolation experienced by some older fluent speakers by acknowledging and recognising the value of their local and linguistic heritage; involve and train adult learners of Gaelic to conduct the interviews; and enhance learners' access to varied vocabulary and idiomatic expression over the project period.

The book, published in Gaelic and English, has an accompanying CD which features a range of people talking informally in Gaelic about their lives and work. It was produced by Kenneth Lindsay and edited by Morag MacNeill. (You can purchase the book by following the link below.)

Clì Gàidhlig would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for their financial help with the project.

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Donald Maclean talks about the Berlin Wall (1 of 3)

2000s

audio; World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; wars;

Clì Gàidhlig

Mas Math Mo Chuimhne (Reflection of the Gaels)

In this audio extract Donald Maclean talks about his experiences of the Berlin Wall.<br /> <br /> 'Uill...nuair a chaidh mi a Bherlin - 's ann ann an naoi ceud deug trì fichead - agus, an ath-bhliadhn', anns an Lùnastal, bliadhna an dèidh sin, chaidh a bhalla a thogail. So, bha mi ann a sin, 's chunnaic mi a' bhalla nuair a chaidh e thogail. Bha mi...'s e Didòmhnaich a bh' ann, agus cha robh fhios aig duine sam bith dè bha a' dol a thachairt.<br /> <br /> Sa mhadainn, bha mise a' dol sìos fhaicinn dè bha dol ann am Berlin fhèin 's chur mi orm dìreach èideadh sìobhalta. Chaidh mi air an trèana beag, fo thalamh - an 'underground': 'u-bahn' a bha aca air 's chaidh mi gu àite ris an can 'ad - far an robh gàrradh nam beathaichean, no 'zoological garden'. Agus, nuair a thàinig mi a-mach às an trèana, bha feadhainn a' reic pàipearan-naidheachd sònraichte, ag ràdh gu robh tancaichean nan Ruiseanach dìreach aig a' chrìoch, far an robh Earrann Ruiseanach agus an Earrann Bhreatannach a' tighinn ri chèile. Agus, bha mi a' faicinn mòran de shluagh a' coiseachd dhan an àite sin, agus lean mi 'ad. Agus bha sin dìreach faisg air an 'Reichstag' agus dìreach - chan eil fhios 'am cia mheud slat - air falbh bhon a' Gheata 'Brandenburg', agus bha an Geata 'Brandenburg' air an taobh eile agus, ann an sin, bha na clachairean ag obair air a' bhalla agus le saighdearan bhon Gearmailt an Ear le gunnaichean, dìreach sealltainn orra gu geur, agus tha iadsan a' cur suas a' bhalla. Ach, cha do rinn sinn dad. Leig sinn leotha a' bhalla a thogail. Bha mòran mìltean de Ghearmailtich a' feuchainn ri fhaighinn air falbh aig an àm sin.'<br /> <br /> The English translates as:<br /> <br /> 'When I went to Berlin - that was in nineteen-sixty, sixty itself - and, the next year, in, in August, the year after that, the wall was built. So, I was there. I saw the wall being built. I was, it was a Sunday, and nobody knew what was going to happen.<br /> <br /> 'In the morning I thought that I would go down to see what was happening in Berlin itself and I just put on my civilian clothes. I went on the small train, underground - the unter, 'u-bahn' they called it, and I went to a place called - where the animal garden was, or the Zoological Garden. And, when I came out of the train, some folk were selling newspapers, special edition newspapers, papers saying there were Russian tanks just at the border where the Section, the Russian Section and the British Section joined. And I saw lots of people walking to that area and I followed them. And that was just near the Reichstag and just - I don't know how many yards away, from the Brandenburg Gate, and the Brandenburg Gate was on the other side and there, the builders were working on the wall, and soldiers from East Germany were there, with guns, just watching them keenly, and they were putting up the wall. But we didn't say anything. We left them to build the wall. There were many thousands of Germans trying to get away at that time.<br /> <br /> The extract is from 'Mas math mo chuimhne' (Reflection of the Gaels), published in 2010. This oral history project was led by Clì Gàidhlig - The Gaelic Learners' Association - and involved the recording of stories from native Gaelic speakers which may otherwise have remained unknown to the general public. The key aims were to: document living history and the richness of the language through the memories of volunteer native speakers; help combat the feelings of isolation experienced by some older fluent speakers by acknowledging and recognising the value of their local and linguistic heritage; involve and train adult learners of Gaelic to conduct the interviews; and enhance learners' access to varied vocabulary and idiomatic expression over the project period.<br /> <br /> The book, published in Gaelic and English, has an accompanying CD which features a range of people talking informally in Gaelic about their lives and work. It was produced by Kenneth Lindsay and edited by Morag MacNeill. (You can purchase the book by following the link below.)<br /> <br /> Clì Gàidhlig would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund for their financial help with the project.