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TITLE
Evanton Oral History Project - Eppie Buist (1 of 7 )
EXTERNAL ID
EOHP_EPPIE_BUIST_01
PLACENAME
Evanton
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Kiltearn
DATE OF RECORDING
1991; 1992
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Eppie Buist
SOURCE
Evanton Oral History Project
ASSET ID
41125
KEYWORDS
audios
recollections
oral histories
oral history

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This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. In this extract Eppie Buist talks about her family background.


Interviewer: Well, you were brought up in Ardgay but sent away? Well you were, you were the bane in the life of various different governesses?

And nannies.

Interviewer: And nannies.

Ten nannies left too.

Interviewer: I see.

Ten nannies and fourteen governesses for five children wasn't a bad record, really, was it?

Interviewer: No. Did you have bets to see how long they would last?

Yes, more or less. No, too young for that. No, we just were tiresome, and me mostly. I was the naughtiest one. And my brother next to me - I'm the oldest - and then brother next to me, he was rather, rather goody goody when he was young but I used to put him up to this sort of thing, you see, so we were always dubbed together. We were very close in age, about fifteen months or something between us and we did everything together but it was always me that was the troublemaker. Poor Jock used to get into the same trouble but he didn't deserve it, really.

Interviewer: I see. You kept quiet. Mmm.

Yes.

Interviewer: Well, your father was Sir Robert Brooke?

Yes.

Interviewer: When was he ennobled? Or was that...

His father was...

Interviewer: Yes.

...a very, very stiff, hard - I don't know was he hard - but he was a very, very severe old boy, my grandfather, and not a bit like my father who was absolutely the best fun in the world. He had a leg in both generations; he could understand all the nonsense of young people but he never, but all the sort of sense of old age and that. Well, he was never old; he died at 57 of a burst appendix. Not exactly, one of those clots that you get after an operation, you know?

Interviewer: Yes.

Wasn't the appendix, really, but the reason for the operation was the appendix.

Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.

So we didn't have him for very long. Went all through the First War and never got a scratch. From '14 to '18 he was in France and he never got a scratch. He got a wee whiff of gas once but he said he knew how to take cover and he didn't...

Interviewer: Gosh

... he didn't get anything. He was never ill.

Interviewer; So he was with the Count- he was an elected officer of the County Council for many years?

Yes.

Interviewer: And became Convenor?

Head of Ross-shire County Council and that's how they ran in those days.

Interviewer: Well respected, would you say, in the council?

Oh much loved, yes.

Interviewer: Loved as well?

Oh yes, loved by everyone in this county, I think. Yes.

Interviewer: And your mother?

My mother was an Aberdonian and she was absolutely marvellous; she could do anything that he did. She used to go duck punting. You know that terribly cold sport when you lie in the bottom on a punt, when the ice is on the seashore?

Interviewer: I've read about it, yes. I haven't...

When the ice is on the seashore, and you have a cannon and the g-, you get lots of ducks sometimes. You don't get very often. You get frozen to death but you get them. She always went with him.'


Eppie Buist (1910-2008) was a resident of Katewell, near Evanton, Ross-shire. She was born Elizabeth Jean Brooke, in York, but spent most of her life in Ross-shire, breeding and exporting gun dogs across the world. Her family moved to the 14,000-acre Mid-Fearn Estate in Ross-shire when Eppie was a young girl and she and her brothers and sisters were brought up by a series of nannies and governesses. In 1939 she married a young naval officer, Malcolm Buist, whose brother Colin had served as an equerry to Edward VIII. After the war Eppie and Malcolm undertook a series of projects culminating in their move to Katewell, the former mill house for the Glenskiach Distillery. After Malcolm's death in 1965 Eppie continued to breed pointers, attending and winning championships at home and abroad. She remained very active in her later years, driving until she was 95 and taking a glider flight the following year. She died aged 98 and is survived by two daughters, Mary and Jane.

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Evanton Oral History Project - Eppie Buist (1 of 7 )

ROSS: Kiltearn

1990s

audios; recollections; oral histories; oral history

Evanton Oral History Project

Evanton Oral History Project

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. In this extract Eppie Buist talks about her family background.<br /> <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Well, you were brought up in Ardgay but sent away? Well you were, you were the bane in the life of various different governesses?<br /> <br /> And nannies.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And nannies.<br /> <br /> Ten nannies left too.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I see.<br /> <br /> Ten nannies and fourteen governesses for five children wasn't a bad record, really, was it?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: No. Did you have bets to see how long they would last?<br /> <br /> Yes, more or less. No, too young for that. No, we just were tiresome, and me mostly. I was the naughtiest one. And my brother next to me - I'm the oldest - and then brother next to me, he was rather, rather goody goody when he was young but I used to put him up to this sort of thing, you see, so we were always dubbed together. We were very close in age, about fifteen months or something between us and we did everything together but it was always me that was the troublemaker. Poor Jock used to get into the same trouble but he didn't deserve it, really.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I see. You kept quiet. Mmm.<br /> <br /> Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Well, your father was Sir Robert Brooke?<br /> <br /> Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: When was he ennobled? Or was that...<br /> <br /> His father was...<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> ...a very, very stiff, hard - I don't know was he hard - but he was a very, very severe old boy, my grandfather, and not a bit like my father who was absolutely the best fun in the world. He had a leg in both generations; he could understand all the nonsense of young people but he never, but all the sort of sense of old age and that. Well, he was never old; he died at 57 of a burst appendix. Not exactly, one of those clots that you get after an operation, you know?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Wasn't the appendix, really, but the reason for the operation was the appendix.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> So we didn't have him for very long. Went all through the First War and never got a scratch. From '14 to '18 he was in France and he never got a scratch. He got a wee whiff of gas once but he said he knew how to take cover and he didn't...<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Gosh<br /> <br /> ... he didn't get anything. He was never ill.<br /> <br /> Interviewer; So he was with the Count- he was an elected officer of the County Council for many years?<br /> <br /> Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And became Convenor?<br /> <br /> Head of Ross-shire County Council and that's how they ran in those days.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Well respected, would you say, in the council?<br /> <br /> Oh much loved, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Loved as well?<br /> <br /> Oh yes, loved by everyone in this county, I think. Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And your mother?<br /> <br /> My mother was an Aberdonian and she was absolutely marvellous; she could do anything that he did. She used to go duck punting. You know that terribly cold sport when you lie in the bottom on a punt, when the ice is on the seashore?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I've read about it, yes. I haven't...<br /> <br /> When the ice is on the seashore, and you have a cannon and the g-, you get lots of ducks sometimes. You don't get very often. You get frozen to death but you get them. She always went with him.'<br /> <br /> <br /> Eppie Buist (1910-2008) was a resident of Katewell, near Evanton, Ross-shire. She was born Elizabeth Jean Brooke, in York, but spent most of her life in Ross-shire, breeding and exporting gun dogs across the world. Her family moved to the 14,000-acre Mid-Fearn Estate in Ross-shire when Eppie was a young girl and she and her brothers and sisters were brought up by a series of nannies and governesses. In 1939 she married a young naval officer, Malcolm Buist, whose brother Colin had served as an equerry to Edward VIII. After the war Eppie and Malcolm undertook a series of projects culminating in their move to Katewell, the former mill house for the Glenskiach Distillery. After Malcolm's death in 1965 Eppie continued to breed pointers, attending and winning championships at home and abroad. She remained very active in her later years, driving until she was 95 and taking a glider flight the following year. She died aged 98 and is survived by two daughters, Mary and Jane.