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TITLE
Evanton Oral History Project - Eppie Buist (2 of 7 )
EXTERNAL ID
EOHP_EPPIE_BUIST_02
PLACENAME
Evanton
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Kiltearn
DATE OF RECORDING
1991; 1992
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Eppie Buist
SOURCE
Evanton Oral History Project
ASSET ID
41126
KEYWORDS
audios
recollections
oral histories
oral history

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This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. In this extract Eppie Buist talks about hunting and stalking.


Interviewer: But you used to come hunting at Novar?

Oh yes.

Interviewer: Did you shoot, yourself?

Yes, and lots of other places. At Fearn, I mean, I went every day...

Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.

...with my little spaniels. Shot something most days.

Interviewer: Yes.

All on my own with the spaniels, that's what I liked best.

Interviewer: Just for fun, or for, for?

Just training the spaniels and just for fun. Rabbits for the pot, for the dogs.

Interviewer: Yes. So you were a good shot?

Not very, no. Not as good as I should have been with all I did.

Interviewer: Yes.

And rifle as well, for stalking. I have stalked on eleven different forests which makes it awfully interesting, you know, now, looking back on it, and the memory of all the - And only one that was boring and that was Eilean Rioch [Daroch?], at Dundonnell, where there was a stalker called Cameron, in those days, who didn't approve of women going stalking so he made it as dull as possible for you. He never told you, you know, 'The wind is here so we'll go here', and 'That's the stag we're going to get but we won't be able to go in that way, we'll have to...' He never discussed it with you, or anything, like all the stalkers do; he just sort of took you in like an old bag, dragging behind him, and then gave you the rifle and said, 'Take yon one'. I didn't enjoy it, I never went back.

Interviewer: Yes.

I didn't enjoy it at all. All the other stalkers, you know, discussed what you were going to do and it's much more fun.

Interviewer: Were there any other women?

Oh yes.

Interviewer: Yes.

Oh yes, quite a lot. Both those schoolfriends of mine. One of them was a marvellous shot, and my sister is a marvellous shot. She's just, just given it up, I think, about two years ago; she's much younger than me. She's got arthritis hips as well and she's just given it up. But she was super; she had a single shot Winchester with this sort of action underneath and she could load it as quick as anyone could shoot with a magazine. She kept the bullets on a clip on her jacket, here, and she just put them in like that [?]. It was an old, old thing with very, very, that sort of trajectory, you know?

Interviewer: Yes.

You had to change your sighting for every fifty yards. She didn't miss much. Then she got a modern on and was invincible with that! But mine, I still have to pay my firearms certificate because I've still got it, you see.

Interviewer: But Novar itself; that was let out for shooting?

That was the - yes, the grouse, were let, I think, to these Alhusens, I think it was the Alhusens, They used to hire dogs to so many people, I can't really remember.

Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.

But old Lord Novar was primarily interested in the trees, I think, those wonderful trees that are on Novar.

Interviewer: Did you ever shoot down at Balconie?

Who were the people there called?

Interviewer: Banks.

Banks, yes. Well, I remember an old, I think it was an old uncle of hers who used to have a deer forest up the Carron River called Dearnnich [?]

Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.

Do you know about Dearnnich[?] Away up the Carron River from Ardgay, way up there, and he came from Lancashire or somewhere like that, and he could sit on his hunkers all through lunch. He used to sit, you know, like that, like miners do, eat his lunch like that, it was a shooting lunch, and I think is was a great uncle or something of Joyce Banks that owned this place.


Eppie Buist (1910-2008) was a resident of Katewell, near Evanton, Ross-shire. She was born Elizabeth Jean Brooke, in York, but spent most of her life in Ross-shire, breeding and exporting gun dogs across the world. Her family moved to the 14,000-acre Mid-Fearn Estate in Ross-shire when Eppie was a young girl and she and her brothers and sisters were brought up by a series of nannies and governesses. In 1939 she married a young naval officer, Malcolm Buist, whose brother Colin had served as an equerry to Edward VIII. After the war Eppie and Malcolm undertook a series of projects culminating in their move to Katewell, the former mill house for the Glenskiach Distillery. After Malcolm's death in 1965 Eppie continued to breed pointers, attending and winning championships at home and abroad. She remained very active in her later years, driving until she was 95 and taking a glider flight the following year. She died aged 98 and is survived by two daughters, Mary and Jane.

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Evanton Oral History Project - Eppie Buist (2 of 7 )

ROSS: Kiltearn

1990s

audios; recollections; oral histories; oral history

Evanton Oral History Project

Evanton Oral History Project

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. In this extract Eppie Buist talks about hunting and stalking.<br /> <br /> <br /> Interviewer: But you used to come hunting at Novar?<br /> <br /> Oh yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you shoot, yourself?<br /> <br /> Yes, and lots of other places. At Fearn, I mean, I went every day...<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> ...with my little spaniels. Shot something most days.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> All on my own with the spaniels, that's what I liked best. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Just for fun, or for, for?<br /> <br /> Just training the spaniels and just for fun. Rabbits for the pot, for the dogs.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes. So you were a good shot?<br /> <br /> Not very, no. Not as good as I should have been with all I did.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> And rifle as well, for stalking. I have stalked on eleven different forests which makes it awfully interesting, you know, now, looking back on it, and the memory of all the - And only one that was boring and that was Eilean Rioch [Daroch?], at Dundonnell, where there was a stalker called Cameron, in those days, who didn't approve of women going stalking so he made it as dull as possible for you. He never told you, you know, 'The wind is here so we'll go here', and 'That's the stag we're going to get but we won't be able to go in that way, we'll have to...' He never discussed it with you, or anything, like all the stalkers do; he just sort of took you in like an old bag, dragging behind him, and then gave you the rifle and said, 'Take yon one'. I didn't enjoy it, I never went back.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> I didn't enjoy it at all. All the other stalkers, you know, discussed what you were going to do and it's much more fun.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Were there any other women?<br /> <br /> Oh yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Oh yes, quite a lot. Both those schoolfriends of mine. One of them was a marvellous shot, and my sister is a marvellous shot. She's just, just given it up, I think, about two years ago; she's much younger than me. She's got arthritis hips as well and she's just given it up. But she was super; she had a single shot Winchester with this sort of action underneath and she could load it as quick as anyone could shoot with a magazine. She kept the bullets on a clip on her jacket, here, and she just put them in like that [?]. It was an old, old thing with very, very, that sort of trajectory, you know?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> You had to change your sighting for every fifty yards. She didn't miss much. Then she got a modern on and was invincible with that! But mine, I still have to pay my firearms certificate because I've still got it, you see.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: But Novar itself; that was let out for shooting? <br /> <br /> That was the - yes, the grouse, were let, I think, to these Alhusens, I think it was the Alhusens, They used to hire dogs to so many people, I can't really remember. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> But old Lord Novar was primarily interested in the trees, I think, those wonderful trees that are on Novar.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you ever shoot down at Balconie?<br /> <br /> Who were the people there called?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Banks.<br /> <br /> Banks, yes. Well, I remember an old, I think it was an old uncle of hers who used to have a deer forest up the Carron River called Dearnnich [?]<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> Do you know about Dearnnich[?] Away up the Carron River from Ardgay, way up there, and he came from Lancashire or somewhere like that, and he could sit on his hunkers all through lunch. He used to sit, you know, like that, like miners do, eat his lunch like that, it was a shooting lunch, and I think is was a great uncle or something of Joyce Banks that owned this place.<br /> <br /> <br /> Eppie Buist (1910-2008) was a resident of Katewell, near Evanton, Ross-shire. She was born Elizabeth Jean Brooke, in York, but spent most of her life in Ross-shire, breeding and exporting gun dogs across the world. Her family moved to the 14,000-acre Mid-Fearn Estate in Ross-shire when Eppie was a young girl and she and her brothers and sisters were brought up by a series of nannies and governesses. In 1939 she married a young naval officer, Malcolm Buist, whose brother Colin had served as an equerry to Edward VIII. After the war Eppie and Malcolm undertook a series of projects culminating in their move to Katewell, the former mill house for the Glenskiach Distillery. After Malcolm's death in 1965 Eppie continued to breed pointers, attending and winning championships at home and abroad. She remained very active in her later years, driving until she was 95 and taking a glider flight the following year. She died aged 98 and is survived by two daughters, Mary and Jane.