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TITLE
Evanton Oral History Project - Eppie Buist (4 of 7 )
EXTERNAL ID
EOHP_EPPIE_BUIST_04
PLACENAME
Evanton
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Kiltearn
DATE OF RECORDING
1991; 1992
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Eppie Buist
SOURCE
Evanton Oral History Project
ASSET ID
41128
KEYWORDS
audios
recollections
oral histories
oral history

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This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. In this extract Eppie Buist talks about her husband's experiences during the Second World War including an anecdote about General De Gaulle.


Interviewer: Your husband Malc Uist, he was a Commando, is that right?

No, he wasn't a Commando.

Interviewer: He wasn't?

He operated these little French ships from a base in Gosport, the submarine base whose name I can't remember. Blockhouse. The submarine base. We had a few berths for our boats there. But very soon we were asked to go because the French sailors were so good at stealing people's hens. There were trains, in the war, you see, short of food and things - there were trains of feathers from everybody's henhouse back to these ships. So, they asked us to remove ourselves and go over to the Isle of Wight and have our own base over there, which we did, and De Gaulle used to come over and visit us. And I can tell you quite a naughty story about De Gaulle. Would you like this on?

Interviewer: Oh, I'd like a naughty story about De Gaulle.

Yes, it's lovely. Well, Malc had a parade for him, because he was very important after all, he was the head of everything, wasn't he, and the Free French? And Malc sort of had a parade of all the services; he had the, all the WRENS and the APPS, and the WAAFS, and the whole lot, and at the end came the WVS ladies in those tweed coats, you know, hurpling along with arthritis and things, and De Gaulle had never seen anything like that. So, they were sitting up watching this parade and he whispered to Malc, he said, 'And who are zees ladies here?' And Malc said, 'Oh, that's the Women's Voluntary Service.' A long pause. 'Oh, I think I prefer to pay!'

[Laughter]

Wasn't that lovely? Malc dined out on that a lot.

I've, I've heard that one before. Now, I wonder...

It's absolutely true; it happened to my Malcolm.

Interviewer: I see, and that's the origin of the story.

Yes. That is really true.

Interviewer: Ha ha.


Eppie Buist (1910-2008) was a resident of Katewell, near Evanton, Ross-shire. She was born Elizabeth Jean Brooke, in York, but spent most of her life in Ross-shire, breeding and exporting gun dogs across the world. Her family moved to the 14,000-acre Mid-Fearn Estate in Ross-shire when Eppie was a young girl and she and her brothers and sisters were brought up by a series of nannies and governesses. In 1939 she married a young naval officer, Malcolm Buist, whose brother Colin had served as an equerry to Edward VIII. After the war Eppie and Malcolm undertook a series of projects culminating in their move to Katewell, the former mill house for the Glenskiach Distillery. After Malcolm's death in 1965 Eppie continued to breed pointers, attending and winning championships at home and abroad. She remained very active in her later years, driving until she was 95 and taking a glider flight the following year. She died aged 98 and is survived by two daughters, Mary and Jane.

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Evanton Oral History Project - Eppie Buist (4 of 7 )

ROSS: Kiltearn

1990s

audios; recollections; oral histories; oral history

Evanton Oral History Project

Evanton Oral History Project

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. In this extract Eppie Buist talks about her husband's experiences during the Second World War including an anecdote about General De Gaulle.<br /> <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Your husband Malc Uist, he was a Commando, is that right?<br /> <br /> No, he wasn't a Commando.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: He wasn't?<br /> <br /> He operated these little French ships from a base in Gosport, the submarine base whose name I can't remember. Blockhouse. The submarine base. We had a few berths for our boats there. But very soon we were asked to go because the French sailors were so good at stealing people's hens. There were trains, in the war, you see, short of food and things - there were trains of feathers from everybody's henhouse back to these ships. So, they asked us to remove ourselves and go over to the Isle of Wight and have our own base over there, which we did, and De Gaulle used to come over and visit us. And I can tell you quite a naughty story about De Gaulle. Would you like this on?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh, I'd like a naughty story about De Gaulle.<br /> <br /> Yes, it's lovely. Well, Malc had a parade for him, because he was very important after all, he was the head of everything, wasn't he, and the Free French? And Malc sort of had a parade of all the services; he had the, all the WRENS and the APPS, and the WAAFS, and the whole lot, and at the end came the WVS ladies in those tweed coats, you know, hurpling along with arthritis and things, and De Gaulle had never seen anything like that. So, they were sitting up watching this parade and he whispered to Malc, he said, 'And who are zees ladies here?' And Malc said, 'Oh, that's the Women's Voluntary Service.' A long pause. 'Oh, I think I prefer to pay!'<br /> <br /> [Laughter]<br /> <br /> Wasn't that lovely? Malc dined out on that a lot.<br /> <br /> I've, I've heard that one before. Now, I wonder...<br /> <br /> It's absolutely true; it happened to my Malcolm. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: I see, and that's the origin of the story.<br /> <br /> Yes. That is really true.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Ha ha.<br /> <br /> <br /> Eppie Buist (1910-2008) was a resident of Katewell, near Evanton, Ross-shire. She was born Elizabeth Jean Brooke, in York, but spent most of her life in Ross-shire, breeding and exporting gun dogs across the world. Her family moved to the 14,000-acre Mid-Fearn Estate in Ross-shire when Eppie was a young girl and she and her brothers and sisters were brought up by a series of nannies and governesses. In 1939 she married a young naval officer, Malcolm Buist, whose brother Colin had served as an equerry to Edward VIII. After the war Eppie and Malcolm undertook a series of projects culminating in their move to Katewell, the former mill house for the Glenskiach Distillery. After Malcolm's death in 1965 Eppie continued to breed pointers, attending and winning championships at home and abroad. She remained very active in her later years, driving until she was 95 and taking a glider flight the following year. She died aged 98 and is survived by two daughters, Mary and Jane.