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TITLE
Life on the Foulis Estate, Kiltearn (1 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
EOHP_FOULIS_ESTATE_01
PLACENAME
Foulis
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Kiltearn
DATE OF RECORDING
1991; 1992
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Marianne Chamier & Joan Paton
SOURCE
Evanton Oral History Project
ASSET ID
41132
KEYWORDS
audios
estates
Clan Munro
Munros of Foulis

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This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark.

In this extract, sisters Marianne Chamier and Joan Paton (née Gascoigne) recall their childhood visits to their grandparents at Foulis Castle during the first quarter of the 20th century.

Interviewer: You used to visit Foulis from an early age?

Marianne: Yes. I used to be sent up for the summer holidays was the great thing, to Granny & Grandpa, to prevent me teasing the others.

Interviewer: Were you the oldest?

Marianne: Yes, I was the eldest by four years and had a very great fun at Foulis; it was really lovely. I enjoyed it so much.

Joan: It was a large - I mean, there were what, two housemaids?

Marianne: Well, there were two housemaids, a kitchen maid, a cook. What else was there? A table maid, who did table service, you know, and that sort of thing.

Joan: A scullery maid.

Marianne: And I think did things to Grandfather's clothes, too didn't she?

Joan: Yes, she looked after his clothes. And there was a scullery maid.

Marianne: A scullery maid, poor thing. And, of course, the kitchen was right down below.

Joan: And there were three gardeners and they, the gardeners used to...

Marianne: Two garden boys and head gardener. Is that right? And the old man, Granty, who used to come up from Evanton and I had a high old time with them; needless to say my first boyfriend was one of the garden boys. I was always in trouble with the garden boys. Caught riding on one of their backs by Gaga, my grandfather, on Sunday, I remember, round the rhododendron bushes aged about ten. And we used to...

Joan: We were also caught shovelling coal.

Marianne: Yes, I was at, oh terrible trouble I got into. No, I was about twelve, I suppose, by helping the garden boys to shovel the coal, you know, into the coalhouses in the courtyard at Foulis, and then walking up the back stairs in bare feet, covered in coal dust on every step.

Interviewer: I see. And was it the dirt that your grandmother worried about?

Marianne: The dirt.

Interviewer: Or that fact you'd been...

Marianne: The back, the back stairs.

Interviewer: ...having such a good time with the...

Marianne: No, no, no. It's the marks on the back stairs. And I was put into the drawing room and told my grandfather would speak to me. I was absolutely terrified but he was the most mild old man, you know, he just said, you know, 'Mustn't do that', you know.

Interviewer: He wasn't the strict disciplinarian?

Marianne: No, no, no. Not at all. Except on Sundays; we weren't allowed to do, play tennis, or any sort of games, or cards, on Sundays.

Interviewer: So what could you do?

Marianne: Read books.

Interviewer: Read a book or?

Marianne: Everything, go for walks. That sort of thing. And he wasn't Free Church but we weren't allowed especially cards and games, outside games you might like to play.

Interviewer: Yes.

Joan: Yes, you could do anything else; you could go down to the ferry
and...

Marianne: Yes. Oh, yes.

Joan: ...all that sort of thing.

Marianne: And family prayers every morning.

Joan: We had a pony too. A Shetland pony.

Marianne: Yes, ponies there were. Bicycles. Donkey cart. Yes we used to play a lot - at Foulis Mains there was a grieve with a big family of children. Are there any existing still?

Joan: No, I don't think so.

Marianne: All gone. I used to play a lot with them. There was a boy about my age and we used to - I've got pictures of us in a donkey card together, you know? We had a very happy, free time, really.

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Life on the Foulis Estate, Kiltearn (1 of 16)

ROSS: Kiltearn

1990s

audios; estates; Clan Munro; Munros of Foulis

Evanton Oral History Project

Evanton Oral History Project

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. <br /> <br /> In this extract, sisters Marianne Chamier and Joan Paton (née Gascoigne) recall their childhood visits to their grandparents at Foulis Castle during the first quarter of the 20th century.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You used to visit Foulis from an early age?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes. I used to be sent up for the summer holidays was the great thing, to Granny & Grandpa, to prevent me teasing the others.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Were you the oldest?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes, I was the eldest by four years and had a very great fun at Foulis; it was really lovely. I enjoyed it so much.<br /> <br /> Joan: It was a large - I mean, there were what, two housemaids?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Well, there were two housemaids, a kitchen maid, a cook. What else was there? A table maid, who did table service, you know, and that sort of thing.<br /> <br /> Joan: A scullery maid.<br /> <br /> Marianne: And I think did things to Grandfather's clothes, too didn't she?<br /> <br /> Joan: Yes, she looked after his clothes. And there was a scullery maid.<br /> <br /> Marianne: A scullery maid, poor thing. And, of course, the kitchen was right down below.<br /> <br /> Joan: And there were three gardeners and they, the gardeners used to...<br /> <br /> Marianne: Two garden boys and head gardener. Is that right? And the old man, Granty, who used to come up from Evanton and I had a high old time with them; needless to say my first boyfriend was one of the garden boys. I was always in trouble with the garden boys. Caught riding on one of their backs by Gaga, my grandfather, on Sunday, I remember, round the rhododendron bushes aged about ten. And we used to...<br /> <br /> Joan: We were also caught shovelling coal.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes, I was at, oh terrible trouble I got into. No, I was about twelve, I suppose, by helping the garden boys to shovel the coal, you know, into the coalhouses in the courtyard at Foulis, and then walking up the back stairs in bare feet, covered in coal dust on every step.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I see. And was it the dirt that your grandmother worried about?<br /> <br /> Marianne: The dirt.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Or that fact you'd been...<br /> <br /> Marianne: The back, the back stairs.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: ...having such a good time with the...<br /> <br /> Marianne: No, no, no. It's the marks on the back stairs. And I was put into the drawing room and told my grandfather would speak to me. I was absolutely terrified but he was the most mild old man, you know, he just said, you know, 'Mustn't do that', you know.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: He wasn't the strict disciplinarian?<br /> <br /> Marianne: No, no, no. Not at all. Except on Sundays; we weren't allowed to do, play tennis, or any sort of games, or cards, on Sundays.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So what could you do?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Read books.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Read a book or?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Everything, go for walks. That sort of thing. And he wasn't Free Church but we weren't allowed especially cards and games, outside games you might like to play.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Joan: Yes, you could do anything else; you could go down to the ferry<br /> and...<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes. Oh, yes. <br /> <br /> Joan: ...all that sort of thing.<br /> <br /> Marianne: And family prayers every morning.<br /> <br /> Joan: We had a pony too. A Shetland pony.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes, ponies there were. Bicycles. Donkey cart. Yes we used to play a lot - at Foulis Mains there was a grieve with a big family of children. Are there any existing still?<br /> <br /> Joan: No, I don't think so.<br /> <br /> Marianne: All gone. I used to play a lot with them. There was a boy about my age and we used to - I've got pictures of us in a donkey card together, you know? We had a very happy, free time, really.