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TITLE
Life on the Foulis Estate, Kiltearn (2 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
EOHP_FOULIS_ESTATE_02
PLACENAME
Foulis
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Kiltearn
DATE OF RECORDING
1991; 1992
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Marianne Chamier & Joan Paton
SOURCE
Evanton Oral History Project
ASSET ID
41133
KEYWORDS
audios
estates
Clan Munro
Munros of Foulis

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This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark.

In this extract, sisters Marianne Chamier and Joan Paton (née Gascoigne) recall their childhood visits to their grandparents at Foulis Castle during the first quarter of the 20th century. They also remember staying at Dunskaith House at Nigg,

Interviewer: So you came here every summer, or other times as well?

Marianne: I think, almost every summer. When I was in my teens I must have come.

Joan: Oh, I think so, yes.

Marianne: Yes.

Joan: Other times too.

Marianne: And we certainly came up here for holidays, didn't we, always in the summer?

Joan: Yes.

Marianne: Usually without our father. Just mother came, didn't she?

Joan: Yes.

Marianne: And we used to go to Nigg Ferry...

Interviewer: Yes

Marianne: ...very often, for summer holidays. Well, we stayed all over the place, anyway.

Joan; It doesn't exist now, the big house.

Marianne: We stayed in part of the big house which was let - Dunskaith - which is no more, you know? It was Big Dunskaith which is gone, and Little Dunskaith, the old part, there's a little bit still there. We stayed in cottages; we stayed in the White House which is now gone too.

Joan: I think the fact of the matter was that Granny couldn't, with five of us, it was a bit much for her.

Marianne: Yes, she couldn't stand having five of us at Foulis. I expect that's why - she used to pay for us to go to these places.

Joan: She used to pay the rent. Yes.

Interviewer: When you said there were five of you there was your three brothers - Patrick, Robert and Hector. Is that right?

Marianne: Yes, yes, yes. I think we had an extremely free time when we were young, really, didn't we?

Joan: Oh yes, super.

Marianne: I don't know what you got up to but I got up to all sorts of things. We were - mother was very vague, wasn't she? She always thought no harm would come to you.

Joan: Well, I think the fact that she thought no harm would come to you and she trusted you, she...

Marianne: Yes. But I mean she also never thought you were going to be drowned or...

Joan: No, no.

Marianne: ... anything like that. I mean, the boys used to go out in boats and all sorts of things from Nigg, you know. It was really quite dangerous tides, you know?

Joan: Yes, it was a regular thing to row over to Cromarty every morning...

Marianne: Yes.

Joan: ...from Dunskaith and get a - what was it? A Mars Bar, I think.

Marianne: Go to the baker. Cup cakes we used to get.

Joan: Cup cakes, d'you remember?

Marianne: And also very good - they made smokies at Cromarty, you know. The fishermen smoked them in the vennels there. We used to go, row a boat and get those.

Interviewer: How long did it take to row over?

Joan: Oh, it varied.

Marianne: Depended on what time the tide was.

Joan: We'd very often find ourselves between the Sutors and that sort of thing.

Marianne: And, of course, there was a ferry running...

Joan: Yes, there was always somebody there.

Marianne: ...on demand. You pulled up a sort of blackboard against the pub, when you wanted it, and he came over for you.

Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.

Joan: Yes. I think we were on the whole quite safe. There was always masses of old boys leaning up against the pier.

Marianne: Yes I suppose there were but Mother never did mind about that sort of thing, did she? And remember how we all fell into that pond when we lived in - when we, when we lived in England and used to come up here for the holidays, we lived on the edge of a millpond which was, it had really, was very deep up at the end where we were. We all fell into it one after the other and, I mean, I remember Hector falling in and I'm sure he was too young to have swum, but he sort of clung on to that bridge, or a plank, or something.

Joan: Yes, I think we were looked on by other children, probably better brought up, as sort of lunatics, weren't we?

Marianne: Well, I don't think we much liked parties and things. Did we?

Joan: We hated parties. Yes. I think we were, I think we were very sort of countrified.

Marianne: I think we were considered perhaps rather uncivilised by our more...

Joan: Yes, definitely.

Marianne: ...grander and better off Gascoigne relations...

Interviewer: Yes.

Marianne: ...who were English.

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Life on the Foulis Estate, Kiltearn (2 of 16)

ROSS: Kiltearn

1990s

audios; estates; Clan Munro; Munros of Foulis

Evanton Oral History Project

Evanton Oral History Project

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. <br /> <br /> In this extract, sisters Marianne Chamier and Joan Paton (née Gascoigne) recall their childhood visits to their grandparents at Foulis Castle during the first quarter of the 20th century. They also remember staying at Dunskaith House at Nigg, <br /> <br /> Interviewer: So you came here every summer, or other times as well?<br /> <br /> Marianne: I think, almost every summer. When I was in my teens I must have come.<br /> <br /> Joan: Oh, I think so, yes.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes.<br /> <br /> Joan: Other times too.<br /> <br /> Marianne: And we certainly came up here for holidays, didn't we, always in the summer?<br /> <br /> Joan: Yes.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Usually without our father. Just mother came, didn't she?<br /> <br /> Joan: Yes.<br /> <br /> Marianne: And we used to go to Nigg Ferry...<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes<br /> <br /> Marianne: ...very often, for summer holidays. Well, we stayed all over the place, anyway.<br /> <br /> Joan; It doesn't exist now, the big house.<br /> <br /> Marianne: We stayed in part of the big house which was let - Dunskaith - which is no more, you know? It was Big Dunskaith which is gone, and Little Dunskaith, the old part, there's a little bit still there. We stayed in cottages; we stayed in the White House which is now gone too.<br /> <br /> Joan: I think the fact of the matter was that Granny couldn't, with five of us, it was a bit much for her.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes, she couldn't stand having five of us at Foulis. I expect that's why - she used to pay for us to go to these places.<br /> <br /> Joan: She used to pay the rent. Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: When you said there were five of you there was your three brothers - Patrick, Robert and Hector. Is that right?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes, yes, yes. I think we had an extremely free time when we were young, really, didn't we?<br /> <br /> Joan: Oh yes, super.<br /> <br /> Marianne: I don't know what you got up to but I got up to all sorts of things. We were - mother was very vague, wasn't she? She always thought no harm would come to you.<br /> <br /> Joan: Well, I think the fact that she thought no harm would come to you and she trusted you, she...<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes. But I mean she also never thought you were going to be drowned or...<br /> <br /> Joan: No, no.<br /> <br /> Marianne: ... anything like that. I mean, the boys used to go out in boats and all sorts of things from Nigg, you know. It was really quite dangerous tides, you know?<br /> <br /> Joan: Yes, it was a regular thing to row over to Cromarty every morning...<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes.<br /> <br /> Joan: ...from Dunskaith and get a - what was it? A Mars Bar, I think.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Go to the baker. Cup cakes we used to get.<br /> <br /> Joan: Cup cakes, d'you remember?<br /> <br /> Marianne: And also very good - they made smokies at Cromarty, you know. The fishermen smoked them in the vennels there. We used to go, row a boat and get those.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How long did it take to row over?<br /> <br /> Joan: Oh, it varied.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Depended on what time the tide was.<br /> <br /> Joan: We'd very often find ourselves between the Sutors and that sort of thing.<br /> <br /> Marianne: And, of course, there was a ferry running...<br /> <br /> Joan: Yes, there was always somebody there.<br /> <br /> Marianne: ...on demand. You pulled up a sort of blackboard against the pub, when you wanted it, and he came over for you.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> Joan: Yes. I think we were on the whole quite safe. There was always masses of old boys leaning up against the pier.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes I suppose there were but Mother never did mind about that sort of thing, did she? And remember how we all fell into that pond when we lived in - when we, when we lived in England and used to come up here for the holidays, we lived on the edge of a millpond which was, it had really, was very deep up at the end where we were. We all fell into it one after the other and, I mean, I remember Hector falling in and I'm sure he was too young to have swum, but he sort of clung on to that bridge, or a plank, or something.<br /> <br /> Joan: Yes, I think we were looked on by other children, probably better brought up, as sort of lunatics, weren't we?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Well, I don't think we much liked parties and things. Did we?<br /> <br /> Joan: We hated parties. Yes. I think we were, I think we were very sort of countrified.<br /> <br /> Marianne: I think we were considered perhaps rather uncivilised by our more...<br /> <br /> Joan: Yes, definitely.<br /> <br /> Marianne: ...grander and better off Gascoigne relations...<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Marianne: ...who were English.