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TITLE
Life on the Foulis Estate, Kiltearn (5 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
EOHP_FOULIS_ESTATE_05
PLACENAME
Foulis
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Kiltearn
DATE OF RECORDING
1991; 1992
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Marianne Chamier & Joan Paton
SOURCE
Evanton Oral History Project
ASSET ID
41136
KEYWORDS
audios
estates
Clan Munro
Munros of Foulis

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This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark.

In this extract, sisters Marianne Chamier and Joan Paton (née Gascoigne) share their memories of Foulis Castle and Ardullie Lodge.

Interviewer: Now you mentioned Ardullie, earlier.

Marianne: Yes.

Interviewer: You used to stay at Ardullie as well as at Foulis. Is that right?

Marianne: Yes. It was the shooting lodge for Foulis, Ardullie. And we were there - my mother was there during the war, and my sister and I both, with her - while our husbands were away at the war abroad, and when them came back on leave [?] off we went back to join them. But I suppose we were there the whole of the war, weren't we?

Joan: Yes.

Marianne: No elec, no electric light in those days.

Joan: Lamps everywhere.

Marianne: Lamps.

Interviewer: When, when did electricity come to Foulis? Was it later than the, later than the village? Cos the village had the power from the mill.

Marianne: Now I wonder.

Joan: No, well I know my grandfather objected and he didn't like it. He thought it was unnecessary.

Marianne: Who put it in? Was it Gaga who put it in?

Joan: I think it went in after he-

Marianne: Or did Pat put it in?

Joan: No, I think Pat put it in.

Marianne: It was very cheaply done the first time, wasn't it?

Joan: Yes.

Marianne: And those horrid iron tubes. Do you remember?

Joan: I don't think they knew what they were doing half the time.

Marianne: The telephone was put it while my grandfather was there because he was terrified of it. He always thought it was going to explode. He used to hold the receiver out here. He didn't like it at all. But I'm pretty sure - But there was certainly lamps all through the war because I was there with my eldest son, as a baby, when my grandfather was still alive and there was certainly no electricity then.

Joan: No, it came after the war. And the same at Ardullie, I think.

Marianne: And the maids in the house who slept on the top floor in the attics - can you imagine how cold it was? - and if they wanted fires in their bedrooms, which they had, in the winter...

Joan: They had enormous fires. It was lovely.

Marianne: ...enormous roaring fires. They had to carry the coal up the back stairs. But imagine - why didn't the house go on fire, I never can imagine, with my grandfather who was fairly groggy sometimes with rheumatism and so on, he used to, after dinner in the evening, he used to take - there was an enormous lamp, huge thing, silver thing, with an enormous shade - and he used to take it off the table at the end of dinner and walk out of the dinning room carrying this thing at an angle, oil lamp, didn't he?

Joan: Yes, it was terrifying.

Marianne: Generally trod on the cat or the dog or something.

Joan. Absolutely terrifying. And then when you went upstairs to bed there were four, five candlesticks.

Marianne: Candlesticks, you know? But I can't think why that house wasn't burnt down. When you think of those girls - two or three slept upstairs in the attics - carrying, having coal fires in their bedrooms. And all that wood and everything.

Interviewer: Yes, well, there were plenty of castles and houses that did burn down, of course. Maybe you were just lucky?

Marianne: Of course there was the stone stairs at Ardullie, the back stairs is stone - at Foulis - from top to bottom, so I suppose you could have always got out down the back stairs.

Joan: Yes.

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Life on the Foulis Estate, Kiltearn (5 of 16)

ROSS: Kiltearn

1990s

audios; estates; Clan Munro; Munros of Foulis

Evanton Oral History Project

Evanton Oral History Project

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. <br /> <br /> In this extract, sisters Marianne Chamier and Joan Paton (née Gascoigne) share their memories of Foulis Castle and Ardullie Lodge.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now you mentioned Ardullie, earlier.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You used to stay at Ardullie as well as at Foulis. Is that right?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes. It was the shooting lodge for Foulis, Ardullie. And we were there - my mother was there during the war, and my sister and I both, with her - while our husbands were away at the war abroad, and when them came back on leave [?] off we went back to join them. But I suppose we were there the whole of the war, weren't we?<br /> <br /> Joan: Yes.<br /> <br /> Marianne: No elec, no electric light in those days.<br /> <br /> Joan: Lamps everywhere.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Lamps.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: When, when did electricity come to Foulis? Was it later than the, later than the village? Cos the village had the power from the mill.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Now I wonder.<br /> <br /> Joan: No, well I know my grandfather objected and he didn't like it. He thought it was unnecessary.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Who put it in? Was it Gaga who put it in?<br /> <br /> Joan: I think it went in after he-<br /> <br /> Marianne: Or did Pat put it in?<br /> <br /> Joan: No, I think Pat put it in.<br /> <br /> Marianne: It was very cheaply done the first time, wasn't it?<br /> <br /> Joan: Yes.<br /> <br /> Marianne: And those horrid iron tubes. Do you remember?<br /> <br /> Joan: I don't think they knew what they were doing half the time.<br /> <br /> Marianne: The telephone was put it while my grandfather was there because he was terrified of it. He always thought it was going to explode. He used to hold the receiver out here. He didn't like it at all. But I'm pretty sure - But there was certainly lamps all through the war because I was there with my eldest son, as a baby, when my grandfather was still alive and there was certainly no electricity then.<br /> <br /> Joan: No, it came after the war. And the same at Ardullie, I think.<br /> <br /> Marianne: And the maids in the house who slept on the top floor in the attics - can you imagine how cold it was? - and if they wanted fires in their bedrooms, which they had, in the winter...<br /> <br /> Joan: They had enormous fires. It was lovely.<br /> <br /> Marianne: ...enormous roaring fires. They had to carry the coal up the back stairs. But imagine - why didn't the house go on fire, I never can imagine, with my grandfather who was fairly groggy sometimes with rheumatism and so on, he used to, after dinner in the evening, he used to take - there was an enormous lamp, huge thing, silver thing, with an enormous shade - and he used to take it off the table at the end of dinner and walk out of the dinning room carrying this thing at an angle, oil lamp, didn't he?<br /> <br /> Joan: Yes, it was terrifying.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Generally trod on the cat or the dog or something.<br /> <br /> Joan. Absolutely terrifying. And then when you went upstairs to bed there were four, five candlesticks.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Candlesticks, you know? But I can't think why that house wasn't burnt down. When you think of those girls - two or three slept upstairs in the attics - carrying, having coal fires in their bedrooms. And all that wood and everything.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes, well, there were plenty of castles and houses that did burn down, of course. Maybe you were just lucky?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Of course there was the stone stairs at Ardullie, the back stairs is stone - at Foulis - from top to bottom, so I suppose you could have always got out down the back stairs.<br /> <br /> Joan: Yes.