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TITLE
Life on the Foulis Estate, Kiltearn (10 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
EOHP_FOULIS_ESTATE_10
PLACENAME
Foulis
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Kiltearn
DATE OF RECORDING
1991; 1992
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Marianne Chamier & Joan Paton
SOURCE
Evanton Oral History Project
ASSET ID
41141
KEYWORDS
audios
estates
Clan Munro
Munros of Foulis

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This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark.

In this extract, sisters Marianne Chamier and Joan Paton (née Gascoigne) share their memories of the Mains Farm on the Foulis Estate. They also describe their grandfather, Sir Hector Munro (1848-1935) 32nd Clan Chief.

Interviewer: And do you remember the, the Mains Farm, as a young girl?

Marianne: Oh yes, very well. Yes. We were always going up there because they were very kind to us, you know. We used to go in and drink milk straight out of the cow; I couldn't do it now but I did then. And masses of cream. And she made cheeses, the grieve's wife. Proper cheeses, you know, big ones for the house. Awfully good - hard rind and crumbly inside. Very good, sort of - a bit difficult to describe them - a little bit like cheddar but more crumbly, and white. And lots of crowdie, of course.

Interviewer: And did the grieve live in the - ?

Marianne: Lived in where Hector lives. Yes.

Interviewer: Yes, in the Mains Farm.

Marianne: Yes.

Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.

Marianne: I was very frightened; they had a flock of geese there that we were absolutely terrified of - you know how frightening they are?

Interviewer: Yes.

Marianne: They'd chase us.

Interviewer: There were geese, cattle and sheep?

Marianne: Yes. Cattle and sheep. Turkeys, geese, guinea fowl; they had all sorts of things like that. We used to - have the eggs of all sorts of birds to eat, boiled for breakfast, at Foulis.

Interviewer: And then horses?

Marianne: Yes, horses. My grandfather - we always had proper porridge. You know, my grandfather always ate it standing up. I think that was an old habit, wasn't it, the people did? He never sat when he was, to breakfast, till he'd finished his porridge. And he had something funny with the milk. He had the milk in a different thing so it didn't get cold and sort of took it with a spoon, out of a mug or something, and put in on the porridge, as he was eating it.

Interviewer: What a sensible idea, yes.

Marianne: Yes. He was very, very Highland, my grandfather. Very, very - part of the scenery, you know? Ha had a little - we used to be fascinated - he had a little imperial, here, and he waxed the ends of his moustache, and I used to love watching that little pan he used to melt the wax on and put it on in the morning.

Interviewer: Was he a military type, of gentleman?

Marianne: He had been in the, what was known as the militia, but not really, no. But he was Lord Lieutenant most of his lifetime, I think. And he was convener of the council and all that. He took a great interest in all those sort of local affairs, you know? And he was - I think he was - I don't quite know what he was. Was he Chairman of the Highland Railway Board, something like that; he had a sort of gold medal, when he travelled, he never, everywhere, he produced a little medal. He went free on the train because he was something to do with the railway.

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Life on the Foulis Estate, Kiltearn (10 of 16)

ROSS: Kiltearn

1990s

audios; estates; Clan Munro; Munros of Foulis

Evanton Oral History Project

Evanton Oral History Project

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark.<br /> <br /> In this extract, sisters Marianne Chamier and Joan Paton (née Gascoigne) share their memories of the Mains Farm on the Foulis Estate. They also describe their grandfather, Sir Hector Munro (1848-1935) 32nd Clan Chief.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And do you remember the, the Mains Farm, as a young girl?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Oh yes, very well. Yes. We were always going up there because they were very kind to us, you know. We used to go in and drink milk straight out of the cow; I couldn't do it now but I did then. And masses of cream. And she made cheeses, the grieve's wife. Proper cheeses, you know, big ones for the house. Awfully good - hard rind and crumbly inside. Very good, sort of - a bit difficult to describe them - a little bit like cheddar but more crumbly, and white. And lots of crowdie, of course.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And did the grieve live in the - ?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Lived in where Hector lives. Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes, in the Mains Farm.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> Marianne: I was very frightened; they had a flock of geese there that we were absolutely terrified of - you know how frightening they are?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes. <br /> <br /> Marianne: They'd chase us.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: There were geese, cattle and sheep?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes. Cattle and sheep. Turkeys, geese, guinea fowl; they had all sorts of things like that. We used to - have the eggs of all sorts of birds to eat, boiled for breakfast, at Foulis.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And then horses?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes, horses. My grandfather - we always had proper porridge. You know, my grandfather always ate it standing up. I think that was an old habit, wasn't it, the people did? He never sat when he was, to breakfast, till he'd finished his porridge. And he had something funny with the milk. He had the milk in a different thing so it didn't get cold and sort of took it with a spoon, out of a mug or something, and put in on the porridge, as he was eating it.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What a sensible idea, yes.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes. He was very, very Highland, my grandfather. Very, very - part of the scenery, you know? Ha had a little - we used to be fascinated - he had a little imperial, here, and he waxed the ends of his moustache, and I used to love watching that little pan he used to melt the wax on and put it on in the morning.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Was he a military type, of gentleman?<br /> <br /> Marianne: He had been in the, what was known as the militia, but not really, no. But he was Lord Lieutenant most of his lifetime, I think. And he was convener of the council and all that. He took a great interest in all those sort of local affairs, you know? And he was - I think he was - I don't quite know what he was. Was he Chairman of the Highland Railway Board, something like that; he had a sort of gold medal, when he travelled, he never, everywhere, he produced a little medal. He went free on the train because he was something to do with the railway.