Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Life on the Foulis Estate, Kiltearn (13 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
EOHP_FOULIS_ESTATE_13
PLACENAME
Foulis
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Kiltearn
DATE OF RECORDING
1991; 1992
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Marianne Chamier & Joan Paton
SOURCE
Evanton Oral History Project
ASSET ID
41142
KEYWORDS
audios
estates
Clan Munro
Munros of Foulis
2nd World War
World War Two
World War 2
World War II

Get Adobe Flash player

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark.

In this extract, sisters Marianne Chamier and Joan Paton (née Gascoigne) recall a tragic accident which happened on Foulis Estate during the Second World War.

Marianne: There was one rather awful occasion - must have been about midway through the war - we had a young RAF couple living in the flat at the back of the house, and - very windy day, one day, very windy, gale blowing, and we saw from the windows (you looked right down on to the sea, as you know, there) two chaps in uniform going down onto the point where we had a boat pulled up. And there was also a boat that belonged to the Navy - I think that they had a sort of rowing club, or something - and that was pulled up alongside it. And we watched these chaps; we wondered what on earth they were doing down there, because it was private ground, and they didn't appear to have a car, or anything, and we saw them pulling the boat down and we couldn't believe our eyes because it was so frightfully stormy.

So, we went next door and asked this chap, this RAF chap, if he'd go down and ask them what they were up to. And so he went down, by which time they'd got the boat out. And, there was no sail or anything like that, and the wind had got it and, of course, it was whirling it down the firth, as hard as it would go. And they had no oars; they'd taken the oars out, naturally. Wouldn't leave them there overnight, or ... And so, it was really rather frightful because they then proceeded to turn over. And we could see them; couldn't get to them. The RAF boat that was lying beside ours had no oars in it. They took them away.

Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.

Marianne: And so we rushed up to the house - we had a telephone mercifully - and rang up the navy at Invergordon and told them that this boat had capsized, and they said they'd do what they could about it, and they'd be up as soon as they could get up, organised. And we said, 'Well, you'd better hurry up because they're clinging to the boat now. It's very, very windy up here, and very cold.' Well, of course, they were - took hours; they went to Foulis Ferry first of all. Didn't know where they were and hadn't a clue what they were looking for. And anyway, the two chaps had drowned.

Interviewer: Oh dear.

Marianne: One, one we saw, hung on a long time. Whether he'd been able to tie himself to it or something, I don't know, but it was ghastly seeing them.

Interviewer: Yes.

Marianne: Really. Drowned before your eyes but absolutely nothing one could do.

Interviewer: Yes, dreadful.

Marianne: So, we then removed the boat; put them right up on the top of the field so it didn't happen again. But it was said that they had been to a party and been dropped off by a lorry going into Dingwall and they were a bit tiddly. I think they must have been something more than tiddly because it was absolutely madness ...

Interviewer: Yes.

Marianne: ... to get into a boat in that storm.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Life on the Foulis Estate, Kiltearn (13 of 16)

ROSS: Kiltearn

1990s

audios; estates; Clan Munro; Munros of Foulis; 2nd World War; World War Two; World War 2; World War II;

Evanton Oral History Project

Evanton Oral History Project

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. <br /> <br /> In this extract, sisters Marianne Chamier and Joan Paton (née Gascoigne) recall a tragic accident which happened on Foulis Estate during the Second World War.<br /> <br /> Marianne: There was one rather awful occasion - must have been about midway through the war - we had a young RAF couple living in the flat at the back of the house, and - very windy day, one day, very windy, gale blowing, and we saw from the windows (you looked right down on to the sea, as you know, there) two chaps in uniform going down onto the point where we had a boat pulled up. And there was also a boat that belonged to the Navy - I think that they had a sort of rowing club, or something - and that was pulled up alongside it. And we watched these chaps; we wondered what on earth they were doing down there, because it was private ground, and they didn't appear to have a car, or anything, and we saw them pulling the boat down and we couldn't believe our eyes because it was so frightfully stormy.<br /> <br /> So, we went next door and asked this chap, this RAF chap, if he'd go down and ask them what they were up to. And so he went down, by which time they'd got the boat out. And, there was no sail or anything like that, and the wind had got it and, of course, it was whirling it down the firth, as hard as it would go. And they had no oars; they'd taken the oars out, naturally. Wouldn't leave them there overnight, or ... And so, it was really rather frightful because they then proceeded to turn over. And we could see them; couldn't get to them. The RAF boat that was lying beside ours had no oars in it. They took them away.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> Marianne: And so we rushed up to the house - we had a telephone mercifully - and rang up the navy at Invergordon and told them that this boat had capsized, and they said they'd do what they could about it, and they'd be up as soon as they could get up, organised. And we said, 'Well, you'd better hurry up because they're clinging to the boat now. It's very, very windy up here, and very cold.' Well, of course, they were - took hours; they went to Foulis Ferry first of all. Didn't know where they were and hadn't a clue what they were looking for. And anyway, the two chaps had drowned.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh dear.<br /> <br /> Marianne: One, one we saw, hung on a long time. Whether he'd been able to tie himself to it or something, I don't know, but it was ghastly seeing them.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Really. Drowned before your eyes but absolutely nothing one could do.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes, dreadful.<br /> <br /> Marianne: So, we then removed the boat; put them right up on the top of the field so it didn't happen again. But it was said that they had been to a party and been dropped off by a lorry going into Dingwall and they were a bit tiddly. I think they must have been something more than tiddly because it was absolutely madness ...<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Marianne: ... to get into a boat in that storm.