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TITLE
Life on the Foulis Estate, Kiltearn (14 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
EOHP_FOULIS_ESTATE_14
PLACENAME
Foulis
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Kiltearn
DATE OF RECORDING
1991; 1992
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Marianne Chamier & Joan Paton
SOURCE
Evanton Oral History Project
ASSET ID
41143
KEYWORDS
audios
estates
Clan Munro
Munros of Foulis
2nd World War
World War Two
World War 2
World War II

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This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark.

In this extract, Marianne Chamier (née Gascoigne) talks about her work as a Red Cross driver during the Second World War.

Marianne: I worked for the Red Cross; I used to take an ambulance over to Aultbea which was a gathering place for these - what did they call them that went over the Atlantic to America?

Interviewer: Convoys.

Marianne: Mmmm?

Interviewer: Convoys?

Marianne: Convoys, that's right. And there was usually some sort of accidents and things on the way home, I suppose, back here. And I used to collect them - bits - and take them up to Tulloch where there was a Red Cross hospital.

Interviewer: Yes.

Marianne: And sometimes they were bare and had to go to Glasgow and I didn't like that much because I didn't know my way through Glasgow and it was blackout. It wasn't very helpful.

Interviewer: You had to drive to Glasgow?

Marianne: Mmmm. Yeh. But it wasn't much fun driving them through - these two hospitals where I had to take them were right the other side of Glasgow. And, as I say, I didn't know Glasgow at all so it was quite, quite tricky, that part of it. I didn't mind the other part. In fact, it was interesting.

Interviewer: How often did you do that?

Marianne: I suppose I must have done it about once or twice a week. I don't know how - I think there were one or two other drivers, but of course the convoys didn't come all that often and, of course, you never knew when they were coming. You had to be more or less at the end of a telephone.

Interviewer: Mmm-hmmm.

Marianne: Not too far away. And ...

Interviewer: And how many would fit in the ambulance?

Marianne: Two at the most. One I was told to keep an eye on; not to let him out of the ambulance. I don't know how they thought I was going to prevent it. Halfway over - I had an uncle and aunt who lived at Starthgarve, and it was a wonderful stopping place where you could get a cup of tea on the way back, and I usually took one out to the chap whoever I had in the van - and to my horror and dismay I went out with a cup of tea for him and he'd vanished. Disappeared, poor chap. And I'd been told to look - keep an eye on him - so I was absolutely horrified. Didn't know what to do. However, suddenly he broke through the rhododendrons which lined the drive and said, 'I'm here', and all he'd wanted to do was spend a penny.

Interviewer: Ah-hah.

Marianne: He had no intention of running away. I think he knew he couldn't run very far.

Interviewer: I see.

Marianne: So that was rather exciting. But, oh yes, you got all sorts of, all sort of complaints, broken- One that was rather trying was a man with a broken back; that was really awfully tricky because the roads were very bad then. Terribly bumpy. They had done their best for him; they'd strapped him down and made it as comfortable as possible but I think it must have been agony.

Interviewer: So would you drive in your own car to Aultbea, or ?

Marianne: I had - no. Go and collect the ambulance at Tulloch Castle and set off from there, and -

Interviewer: You didn't call it Aultbea, did you?

Marianne: Didn't what?

Interviewer: What did you call the place you went to?

Marianne: Port X ...

Interviewer: Port X.

Marianne: ... it was called. Yes. Port X

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Life on the Foulis Estate, Kiltearn (14 of 16)

ROSS: Kiltearn

1990s

audios; estates; Clan Munro; Munros of Foulis; 2nd World War; World War Two; World War 2; World War II;

Evanton Oral History Project

Evanton Oral History Project

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark.<br /> <br /> In this extract, Marianne Chamier (née Gascoigne) talks about her work as a Red Cross driver during the Second World War.<br /> <br /> Marianne: I worked for the Red Cross; I used to take an ambulance over to Aultbea which was a gathering place for these - what did they call them that went over the Atlantic to America?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Convoys.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Mmmm?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Convoys?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Convoys, that's right. And there was usually some sort of accidents and things on the way home, I suppose, back here. And I used to collect them - bits - and take them up to Tulloch where there was a Red Cross hospital.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Marianne: And sometimes they were bare and had to go to Glasgow and I didn't like that much because I didn't know my way through Glasgow and it was blackout. It wasn't very helpful.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You had to drive to Glasgow?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Mmmm. Yeh. But it wasn't much fun driving them through - these two hospitals where I had to take them were right the other side of Glasgow. And, as I say, I didn't know Glasgow at all so it was quite, quite tricky, that part of it. I didn't mind the other part. In fact, it was interesting.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How often did you do that?<br /> <br /> Marianne: I suppose I must have done it about once or twice a week. I don't know how - I think there were one or two other drivers, but of course the convoys didn't come all that often and, of course, you never knew when they were coming. You had to be more or less at the end of a telephone.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mmm-hmmm.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Not too far away. And ...<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And how many would fit in the ambulance?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Two at the most. One I was told to keep an eye on; not to let him out of the ambulance. I don't know how they thought I was going to prevent it. Halfway over - I had an uncle and aunt who lived at Starthgarve, and it was a wonderful stopping place where you could get a cup of tea on the way back, and I usually took one out to the chap whoever I had in the van - and to my horror and dismay I went out with a cup of tea for him and he'd vanished. Disappeared, poor chap. And I'd been told to look - keep an eye on him - so I was absolutely horrified. Didn't know what to do. However, suddenly he broke through the rhododendrons which lined the drive and said, 'I'm here', and all he'd wanted to do was spend a penny.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Ah-hah.<br /> <br /> Marianne: He had no intention of running away. I think he knew he couldn't run very far.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I see.<br /> <br /> Marianne: So that was rather exciting. But, oh yes, you got all sorts of, all sort of complaints, broken- One that was rather trying was a man with a broken back; that was really awfully tricky because the roads were very bad then. Terribly bumpy. They had done their best for him; they'd strapped him down and made it as comfortable as possible but I think it must have been agony.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So would you drive in your own car to Aultbea, or ?<br /> <br /> Marianne: I had - no. Go and collect the ambulance at Tulloch Castle and set off from there, and - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: You didn't call it Aultbea, did you?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Didn't what?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What did you call the place you went to?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Port X ...<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Port X.<br /> <br /> Marianne: ... it was called. Yes. Port X