Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Evanton Oral History Project - Jessie Macdonald (2 of 4)
EXTERNAL ID
EOHP_JESSIE_MACDONALD_02
PLACENAME
Evanton
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Kiltearn
DATE OF RECORDING
1991; 1992
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Jessie Macdonald
SOURCE
Evanton Oral History Project
ASSET ID
41147
KEYWORDS
audios
recollections
oral histories
oral history

Get Adobe Flash player

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. In this extract Jessie MacDonald remembers life on the Balconie Estate, near Evanton.


Interviewer: You all lived on the estate?

On the estate.

Interviewer: Is the cottage still standing?

The cottage is - I would never know I ever lived in it. Never, it's so beautiful. It's all built up, all renovated. All the farm was built up, most beautiful.

Interviewer: Yes. Is it by the steading?

Pardon?

Interviewer: Is it by the Balconie steading?

Balconie steading. Everything is turned into houses and oh, I wouldn't know that I ever lived in it.

Interviewer: Is that where you lived, by the steading.

The steading, yes.

Interviewer: Ah, yes.

The cottage was there but it's not the same cottage now.

Interviewer: No.

A big, beautiful house, like all the other houses.

Interviewer: Yes. And did you help with your, your mother, helping in the dairy, and the hens?

Well, I had to help in the house. I really wanted, I really wanted to stay in school.

Interviewer: Yes.

But they said, in days long ago, girls, they didn't need, they didn't need education.

Interviewer: I see.

So the boys got the education. Well, they liked the - No, my one brother liked the, he liked the farmwork, he really did, but the other one

Other voice: He didn't. He wanted to be away doing other things.

He was away; he went away, and then the war was there, and, of course, they were years, years all away.

Interviewer: Yes.

All away.

Interviewer: So you left school in 1914, was it?

1915.

Interviewer: So what did, what work did you have to do at home, or on the farm?

Oh well there was, there was, well, there was six of a family.

Interviewer; Yes. Were they younger than you?

Well I was the - one, two - I was the fourth.

Interviewer: Yes. And you had to help to look after the younger ones?

I had to help in the house and help help - There was cows, there was cows to - I went out then and milked a cow. Cow's milk. I showed you how to milk.

Interviewer: Aye.

You know, it's a good training.

Other voice: - training, of course it is.

It's a good training.

Interviewer: And was that your cow, or was that the cow from the estate?

No, [?], that was the farm. There's a huge, there was a - the dairy. Now, the dairy's there yet.

Interviewer: Yes.

The dairy has been left. Did you notice that, Georgia?

Other voice: Yes, I did.

The little dairy's been left. It was a lovely - like a little wee house.

Other voice: That's right. It's lovely they left that.

And my mother used to have it - Oh, she had it beautiful. And the cream and all, and the big basins all round.

Other voice: Cream in our porridge, we used to have.

Interviewer: Yes.

And a hen, though I take my tea without milk.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Evanton Oral History Project - Jessie Macdonald (2 of 4)

ROSS: Kiltearn

1990s

audios; recollections; oral histories; oral history

Evanton Oral History Project

Evanton Oral History Project

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. In this extract Jessie MacDonald remembers life on the Balconie Estate, near Evanton.<br /> <br /> <br /> Interviewer: You all lived on the estate?<br /> <br /> On the estate.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Is the cottage still standing?<br /> <br /> The cottage is - I would never know I ever lived in it. Never, it's so beautiful. It's all built up, all renovated. All the farm was built up, most beautiful.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes. Is it by the steading?<br /> <br /> Pardon?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Is it by the Balconie steading?<br /> <br /> Balconie steading. Everything is turned into houses and oh, I wouldn't know that I ever lived in it.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Is that where you lived, by the steading.<br /> <br /> The steading, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Ah, yes.<br /> <br /> The cottage was there but it's not the same cottage now.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: No.<br /> <br /> A big, beautiful house, like all the other houses.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes. And did you help with your, your mother, helping in the dairy, and the hens?<br /> <br /> Well, I had to help in the house. I really wanted, I really wanted to stay in school.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> But they said, in days long ago, girls, they didn't need, they didn't need education.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I see.<br /> <br /> So the boys got the education. Well, they liked the - No, my one brother liked the, he liked the farmwork, he really did, but the other one <br /> <br /> Other voice: He didn't. He wanted to be away doing other things.<br /> <br /> He was away; he went away, and then the war was there, and, of course, they were years, years all away.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> All away.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So you left school in 1914, was it? <br /> <br /> 1915.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So what did, what work did you have to do at home, or on the farm?<br /> <br /> Oh well there was, there was, well, there was six of a family.<br /> <br /> Interviewer; Yes. Were they younger than you?<br /> <br /> Well I was the - one, two - I was the fourth.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes. And you had to help to look after the younger ones?<br /> <br /> I had to help in the house and help help - There was cows, there was cows to - I went out then and milked a cow. Cow's milk. I showed you how to milk.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Aye.<br /> <br /> You know, it's a good training.<br /> <br /> Other voice: - training, of course it is.<br /> <br /> It's a good training.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And was that your cow, or was that the cow from the estate?<br /> <br /> No, [?], that was the farm. There's a huge, there was a - the dairy. Now, the dairy's there yet.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> The dairy has been left. Did you notice that, Georgia?<br /> <br /> Other voice: Yes, I did.<br /> <br /> The little dairy's been left. It was a lovely - like a little wee house.<br /> <br /> Other voice: That's right. It's lovely they left that.<br /> <br /> And my mother used to have it - Oh, she had it beautiful. And the cream and all, and the big basins all round.<br /> <br /> Other voice: Cream in our porridge, we used to have.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> And a hen, though I take my tea without milk.