Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Evanton Oral History Project - Sandy Bethune (5 of 9)
EXTERNAL ID
EOHP_SANDY_BETHUNE_05
PLACENAME
Evanton
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Kiltearn
DATE OF RECORDING
1991; 1992
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Sandy Bethune
SOURCE
Evanton Oral History Project
ASSET ID
41154
KEYWORDS
audios
recollections
oral histories
oral history

Get Adobe Flash player

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. In this extract, former sawmill worker, Sandy Bethune, talks about his service with the Cameron Highlanders during the Second World War.


Interviewer: Did anything exciting happen during those five years?

Oh yes, a lot.

Interviewer: Apart from being liberated?

Oh no, a lot happened there.

Interviewer: Yes.

Between escapes and whatnot and -

Interviewer: Yes. How many were on your camp?

Oh, there'd be about three or four hundred, and [?] bit more.

Interviewer: And where was that? On the Polish Corridor, was it?

That was on the, on the Prussian border, like. Aye. We were in Poland for a while; we were in camp there,and then we got shifted. And then we were in Marienburger or Marienburg as they called it. Ach you were moved about but we were more or less a few years in the one camp. And then moved on.

Interviewer: Did you get parcels from home?

Pardon?

Interviewer: Did you get parcels?

Yes, aye. We did quite well from home.

Interviewer: So you kept in touch.

More or less, aye. Oh I kept writing to the old people, aye.

Interviewer: Yes.

Then you got a letter now and again. The food was the worst.

Interviewer: What was the food, mainly?

Oh just barley soup or [?], you see.

Interviewer: Bread?

Barley soup,

Interviewer: Did you get rye bread or?

Or potato soup and. Aye. Och, we survived on it.

Interviewer: How were the guards?

Some of them were quite good and some of them - Well, you want to forget about them, the bad ones, like. But och, the majority of them were quite good.

Interviewer: Did you have different activities going?

Aye. Oh yes. There's a lot of the boys used to run concerts in the camp.

Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.

And you know you had football, and you had -

Interviewer: And you worked, I understand, on the sawmill out there?

More or less. Sawmill and the - well between the sawmill and the brick factory.

Interviewer: Yes.

And then you went out to the woods sometimes to cut down the trees for the sawmill, you see. Aye. And then they had the farm too. Farm and a branerei, a schnapps factory.

Interviewer: I see.

You had the whole lot, you see. Just two or three days in this one and then you were shifted somewhere else. Oh the sawmill was alright there was - the brick factory was about the worst. And the bricks, so many. So many thousand bricks in the day and then you got a cigarette. Yon Polish cigarettes for the - aye. Ye did so many. There all made from the clay, you see. You dug the clay and that was taken up on skips and dumped in. They were all layed there.

Interviewer: Yes.

And then they were fired; they went up a, a lift on barrows.

Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.

And then they were all fired; the fires coming up underneath. And then they were put into brick ovens, like.

Interviewer: If you had a complaint about your working conditions?

Oh yes, aye, plenty -

Interviewer: Could you speak about them to anybody?

Oh yes, well you spoke to the guard and then went from the guard but - Sometimes there was something done but they never bothered with you that much.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Evanton Oral History Project - Sandy Bethune (5 of 9)

ROSS: Kiltearn

1990s

audios; recollections; oral histories; oral history

Evanton Oral History Project

Evanton Oral History Project

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. In this extract, former sawmill worker, Sandy Bethune, talks about his service with the Cameron Highlanders during the Second World War.<br /> <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did anything exciting happen during those five years?<br /> <br /> Oh yes, a lot.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Apart from being liberated?<br /> <br /> Oh no, a lot happened there.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Between escapes and whatnot and - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes. How many were on your camp?<br /> <br /> Oh, there'd be about three or four hundred, and [?] bit more.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And where was that? On the Polish Corridor, was it?<br /> <br /> That was on the, on the Prussian border, like. Aye. We were in Poland for a while; we were in camp there,and then we got shifted. And then we were in Marienburger or Marienburg as they called it. Ach you were moved about but we were more or less a few years in the one camp. And then moved on.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you get parcels from home?<br /> <br /> Pardon?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you get parcels?<br /> <br /> Yes, aye. We did quite well from home.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So you kept in touch.<br /> <br /> More or less, aye. Oh I kept writing to the old people, aye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Then you got a letter now and again. The food was the worst.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What was the food, mainly?<br /> <br /> Oh just barley soup or [?], you see. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Bread?<br /> <br /> Barley soup, <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you get rye bread or?<br /> <br /> Or potato soup and. Aye. Och, we survived on it.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How were the guards?<br /> <br /> Some of them were quite good and some of them - Well, you want to forget about them, the bad ones, like. But och, the majority of them were quite good.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you have different activities going?<br /> <br /> Aye. Oh yes. There's a lot of the boys used to run concerts in the camp. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> And you know you had football, and you had - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: And you worked, I understand, on the sawmill out there?<br /> <br /> More or less. Sawmill and the - well between the sawmill and the brick factory.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> And then you went out to the woods sometimes to cut down the trees for the sawmill, you see. Aye. And then they had the farm too. Farm and a branerei, a schnapps factory.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I see.<br /> <br /> You had the whole lot, you see. Just two or three days in this one and then you were shifted somewhere else. Oh the sawmill was alright there was - the brick factory was about the worst. And the bricks, so many. So many thousand bricks in the day and then you got a cigarette. Yon Polish cigarettes for the - aye. Ye did so many. There all made from the clay, you see. You dug the clay and that was taken up on skips and dumped in. They were all layed there.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> And then they were fired; they went up a, a lift on barrows.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> And then they were all fired; the fires coming up underneath. And then they were put into brick ovens, like.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: If you had a complaint about your working conditions?<br /> <br /> Oh yes, aye, plenty - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Could you speak about them to anybody?<br /> <br /> Oh yes, well you spoke to the guard and then went from the guard but - Sometimes there was something done but they never bothered with you that much.