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TITLE
Evanton Oral History Project - Sandy Bethune (7 of 9)
EXTERNAL ID
EOHP_SANDY_BETHUNE_07
PLACENAME
Evanton
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Kiltearn
DATE OF RECORDING
1991; 1992
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Sandy Bethune
SOURCE
Evanton Oral History Project
ASSET ID
41156
KEYWORDS
audios
recollections
oral histories
oral history

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This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. In this extract, former sawmill worker, Sandy Bethune, talks about his life in the period following the Second World War.


Interviewer: Anyway, you came back to work at the sawmill -

Back to work at the sawmill, aye.

Interviewer: - which was then being runned by Novar, was it?

That's run by Novar, then. Aye. Mmm-hmm.
Interviewer: Well, first of all you got a job on ?

Aye. Down the camp. More or less there, and I stayed down there, you see, that was - Well I could have left the camp, right enough, and came back to Novar because they came down and asked me to go back to the sawmill. But I started work down in the camp. Came home in 1945, and I had more or less a year's leave -

Interviewer: Yes.

- you see, for the -

Interviewer: Yes.

- being a prisoner. And then went back down to Cirencester -

Interviewer: Yes.

- for I think it was six month down there, more or less, a resettlement. And then when I came back, and when I came back I went down to the camp to work again. And then Novar came down again. So I started here in 1948 then, Novar, or 1947, the end of 1947. Aye. That was, employed by Novar, you see.

Interviewer: It was the same sawmills?

Mmm?

Interviewer: Was it the same sawmills?

Yes, more or less the same sawmill. Aye. Over there at Dalgheal. Aye.

Interviewer: Yes. And then they built the sawmill at ?

They built one in, put one up down the camp.

Interviewer: Yes. Which year was that? Do you know?

Mmm?

Interviewer: Which year was it?

It'd be in the fifties. It'd be -

Interviewer: Yes.

Fifty-two or fifty-three. It'd be fifty-three or fifty-four. Because we were still in Dalgheal when I got married. I was married in 1950.

Interviewer: To Anne Marie Stewart? Is that right?

To Olive, Olive May, aye.

Interviewer: Olive

Olive May, aye.

Interviewer: Yes. And she was from Dingwall?

She was from Dingwall then. Aye, aye. Married in the house, here.

Interviewer: In the house?

In this house.

Interviewer: I see.

Aye. And who, who did that?

Eh, the Reverend Mr Laing from Alness -

Interviewer: Oh yes?

- that married us. I don't think I have the wedding photo; I think the every photos are packed up, I think.

Interviewer: She's in uniform there?

She was in the ATS.

Interviewer: Yes.

But she was - Ah that was, when that was taken she was in the ATS.

Interviewer: Yes.

She wasn't in it when I got married.

Interviewer: Where was she in the ATS, do you know?

She was in Derby, I think.

Interviewer: Uh-huh.

She was all - she was in Inverness a while and then she was in Derby.

Interviewer: Uh-huh. Why, why did you choose to be married in the house?

Eh, well, my own mother, she wasn't very fit like, and then Olive's mother wasn't. So they wanted the wedding here, you see. Ach, just a quiet affair. Aye.

Interviewer: Yes.

Oh we'd a good few here, right enough. Aye.

Interviewer: Was it I this house?

In this house, aye.

Interviewer: Yes.

Through in the other room through there. Aye. You see, my mother used to be in this house. This is the house I came to when I came to Novar and then, when I came home from the army my mother flitted up to the top house. It was a, a bigger house in one way because there were two rooms upstair, you see?

Interviewer: Yes.

And then my sisters, two sisters, working, you see? So they were home, and they took us all in.

Interviewer: Uh-huh.

So then the house was still empty. So when Olive and I decided to get married - that was in 1950, 50 - we decided, 'Och aye', she says, 'We'll take this house.' But the house has been renovated since that. It was the old house then. It was an old range that was in here. And then you had the - it was nice too - because you had the old rafters up above.

Interviewer: Oh yes?

You know, the old wooden rafters. So we spent 32 years here, or more.

Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.

Aye.

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Evanton Oral History Project - Sandy Bethune (7 of 9)

ROSS: Kiltearn

1990s

audios; recollections; oral histories; oral history

Evanton Oral History Project

Evanton Oral History Project

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. In this extract, former sawmill worker, Sandy Bethune, talks about his life in the period following the Second World War.<br /> <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Anyway, you came back to work at the sawmill -<br /> <br /> Back to work at the sawmill, aye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: - which was then being runned by Novar, was it?<br /> <br /> That's run by Novar, then. Aye. Mmm-hmm.<br /> Interviewer: Well, first of all you got a job on ?<br /> <br /> Aye. Down the camp. More or less there, and I stayed down there, you see, that was - Well I could have left the camp, right enough, and came back to Novar because they came down and asked me to go back to the sawmill. But I started work down in the camp. Came home in 1945, and I had more or less a year's leave -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> - you see, for the -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> - being a prisoner. And then went back down to Cirencester -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> - for I think it was six month down there, more or less, a resettlement. And then when I came back, and when I came back I went down to the camp to work again. And then Novar came down again. So I started here in 1948 then, Novar, or 1947, the end of 1947. Aye. That was, employed by Novar, you see.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: It was the same sawmills?<br /> <br /> Mmm?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Was it the same sawmills?<br /> <br /> Yes, more or less the same sawmill. Aye. Over there at Dalgheal. Aye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes. And then they built the sawmill at ?<br /> <br /> They built one in, put one up down the camp.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes. Which year was that? Do you know?<br /> <br /> Mmm?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Which year was it?<br /> <br /> It'd be in the fifties. It'd be - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Fifty-two or fifty-three. It'd be fifty-three or fifty-four. Because we were still in Dalgheal when I got married. I was married in 1950.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: To Anne Marie Stewart? Is that right?<br /> <br /> To Olive, Olive May, aye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Olive<br /> <br /> Olive May, aye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes. And she was from Dingwall?<br /> <br /> She was from Dingwall then. Aye, aye. Married in the house, here.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: In the house?<br /> <br /> In this house.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I see.<br /> <br /> Aye. And who, who did that?<br /> <br /> Eh, the Reverend Mr Laing from Alness -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh yes?<br /> <br /> - that married us. I don't think I have the wedding photo; I think the every photos are packed up, I think.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: She's in uniform there?<br /> <br /> She was in the ATS.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> But she was - Ah that was, when that was taken she was in the ATS.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> She wasn't in it when I got married.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Where was she in the ATS, do you know?<br /> <br /> She was in Derby, I think.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> She was all - she was in Inverness a while and then she was in Derby.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Uh-huh. Why, why did you choose to be married in the house?<br /> <br /> Eh, well, my own mother, she wasn't very fit like, and then Olive's mother wasn't. So they wanted the wedding here, you see. Ach, just a quiet affair. Aye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Oh we'd a good few here, right enough. Aye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Was it I this house?<br /> <br /> In this house, aye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Through in the other room through there. Aye. You see, my mother used to be in this house. This is the house I came to when I came to Novar and then, when I came home from the army my mother flitted up to the top house. It was a, a bigger house in one way because there were two rooms upstair, you see?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> And then my sisters, two sisters, working, you see? So they were home, and they took us all in.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> So then the house was still empty. So when Olive and I decided to get married - that was in 1950, 50 - we decided, 'Och aye', she says, 'We'll take this house.' But the house has been renovated since that. It was the old house then. It was an old range that was in here. And then you had the - it was nice too - because you had the old rafters up above. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh yes?<br /> <br /> You know, the old wooden rafters. So we spent 32 years here, or more.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> Aye.