Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Evanton Oral History Project - Sandy Bethune (8 of 9)
EXTERNAL ID
EOHP_SANDY_BETHUNE_08
PLACENAME
Evanton
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Kiltearn
DATE OF RECORDING
1991; 1992
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Sandy Bethune
SOURCE
Evanton Oral History Project
ASSET ID
41157
KEYWORDS
audios
recollections
oral histories
oral history

Get Adobe Flash player

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. In this extract, former sawmill worker, Sandy Bethune, talks about the changes on the Novar Estate.

Interviewer; Going back to the new sawmill they built across the road. You worked there too?

Yes, I went down there too.

Interviewer: It was a big, a much bigger affair?

A bigger sawmill, aye.

Interviewer: In the big hangar?

Aye, in the big hangar, aye. It's a German mill, you see.

Interviewer: I see.

German mill aye. Oh it's just the same kind as they worked in Germany.

Interviewer: The same kind?

The same thing, aye.

Interviewer: Oh you were well used to that.

Aye, same thing. Worked the same thing, the box saws.

Interviewer: But there was a problem with the quality, was there?

Yes, it could, you know, if you watched it. And if, it's according to the wood you were getting...

Interviewer: Yes.

...you see. Oh yes, there was some good stuff went through.

Interviewer: Was it - I heard there was a problem getting the wood to the right size.

Ah well you had, it was more or less sized before it - and then you had the - it was sized before it went through, like, but then you had this movement in your saws, you just had the one lever and whatever wood you were wanting to cut - if it was rails, it was boarding, sarking and -

Interviewer: Yes. So then you came - the sawmill transferred back again to the estate?

Mmm-hmm. Back to the end of Novar drive, there. [?] treat mill in there.

Interviewer: Where it is today.

Mmm-hmm.

Interviewer: And you worked there until, well '79 full-time and then?

Oh aye. That was '78, or '77 or '78. And then they put in a single bench. But I worked there at the single bench up until I retired fully, like. But then you were doing other work over and above. You were doing work outside the sawmill, you see, in the estate, if you were called for, like. The gardens, or either out in the wood or,

Interviewer: Were you, yes?

Aye. Planting or some of that.

Interviewer: Well, you've seen the estate change a lot through the years?

Aye, in a way, aye. You see when, when we came here there were a big forestry staff, you see. Oh, there would be about twenty men I would think.

Interviewer: The plantations have obviously changed. They've covered a lot more ground since you -

Oh aye, aye. Well, there were no planting, that, even the one going down beside the road there, you see, that wasn't, that's just in the war years, well after the war, I think that was planted, and the one down the back here, another planting out there. Of course, there were a lot of wood cut during the war, you know. A lot of the old plantings were cut, you see, for the, for the war efforts.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Evanton Oral History Project - Sandy Bethune (8 of 9)

ROSS: Kiltearn

1990s

audios; recollections; oral histories; oral history

Evanton Oral History Project

Evanton Oral History Project

This audio extract is from the Evanton Oral History Project, a project undertaken in 1991-92 by Adrian Clark. In this extract, former sawmill worker, Sandy Bethune, talks about the changes on the Novar Estate.<br /> <br /> Interviewer; Going back to the new sawmill they built across the road. You worked there too?<br /> <br /> Yes, I went down there too.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: It was a big, a much bigger affair?<br /> <br /> A bigger sawmill, aye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: In the big hangar?<br /> <br /> Aye, in the big hangar, aye. It's a German mill, you see. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: I see.<br /> <br /> German mill aye. Oh it's just the same kind as they worked in Germany.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The same kind?<br /> <br /> The same thing, aye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh you were well used to that.<br /> <br /> Aye, same thing. Worked the same thing, the box saws.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: But there was a problem with the quality, was there?<br /> <br /> Yes, it could, you know, if you watched it. And if, it's according to the wood you were getting...<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> ...you see. Oh yes, there was some good stuff went through.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Was it - I heard there was a problem getting the wood to the right size.<br /> <br /> Ah well you had, it was more or less sized before it - and then you had the - it was sized before it went through, like, but then you had this movement in your saws, you just had the one lever and whatever wood you were wanting to cut - if it was rails, it was boarding, sarking and - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes. So then you came - the sawmill transferred back again to the estate?<br /> <br /> Mmm-hmm. Back to the end of Novar drive, there. [?] treat mill in there.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Where it is today.<br /> <br /> Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And you worked there until, well '79 full-time and then?<br /> <br /> Oh aye. That was '78, or '77 or '78. And then they put in a single bench. But I worked there at the single bench up until I retired fully, like. But then you were doing other work over and above. You were doing work outside the sawmill, you see, in the estate, if you were called for, like. The gardens, or either out in the wood or,<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Were you, yes?<br /> <br /> Aye. Planting or some of that.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Well, you've seen the estate change a lot through the years?<br /> <br /> Aye, in a way, aye. You see when, when we came here there were a big forestry staff, you see. Oh, there would be about twenty men I would think.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The plantations have obviously changed. They've covered a lot more ground since you - <br /> <br /> Oh aye, aye. Well, there were no planting, that, even the one going down beside the road there, you see, that wasn't, that's just in the war years, well after the war, I think that was planted, and the one down the back here, another planting out there. Of course, there were a lot of wood cut during the war, you know. A lot of the old plantings were cut, you see, for the, for the war efforts.