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TITLE
A Highland railway station office in war time
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_HIGHRAILWAY_01
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
41188
KEYWORDS
Second World War
signal boxes
transportation
audio

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During World War II the Highland railways played an important role, transporting freight and troops to and from the naval bases, airfields, coastal defences, and supply bases throughout the region. In this audio extract, a former railway employee describes a typical war-time station office and the railway signalling arrangements.

'The offices was pretty primitive; it was a big high desk where you normally stood but there was a high wooden stool provided. Normally, depends on the number of staff that was at the station, but where I started it was just the stationmaster and myself. There was two stools provided, one was padded; obviously the stationmaster always had the padded stool. It was oil lighting; when I say oil lighting it was a wick with a globe, and that was all you had, and that was, even, we had to watch for the blackout, even, with that.

The signalling arrangements were the tablet instruments, were in the booking office, and a signal box at either end of the loop. Immediately you became eighteen, you were examined in the rules and regulations for the operating of the tablet instruments and you worked to the dictation of the signalman'

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A Highland railway station office in war time

1980s

Second World War; signal boxes; transportation; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Highland Railways

During World War II the Highland railways played an important role, transporting freight and troops to and from the naval bases, airfields, coastal defences, and supply bases throughout the region. In this audio extract, a former railway employee describes a typical war-time station office and the railway signalling arrangements.<br /> <br /> 'The offices was pretty primitive; it was a big high desk where you normally stood but there was a high wooden stool provided. Normally, depends on the number of staff that was at the station, but where I started it was just the stationmaster and myself. There was two stools provided, one was padded; obviously the stationmaster always had the padded stool. It was oil lighting; when I say oil lighting it was a wick with a globe, and that was all you had, and that was, even, we had to watch for the blackout, even, with that. <br /> <br /> The signalling arrangements were the tablet instruments, were in the booking office, and a signal box at either end of the loop. Immediately you became eighteen, you were examined in the rules and regulations for the operating of the tablet instruments and you worked to the dictation of the signalman'