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TITLE
The Battle of Strome Pier (2 of 2)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_JOHNTHOMAS_08
PLACENAME
Strome Ferry
DISTRICT
South West Ross
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochalsh
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
John Thomas
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
41190
KEYWORDS
Highland Railway
railways
transport
battles
disputes
riots
Sabbath
religion
audio

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The Dingwall and Skye Railway was opened in 1870 but only as far as Strome Ferry on Loch Carron. It would be another twenty-seven years before the railway reached the terminus at Kyle of Lochalsh. In this audio extract, John Thomas (1914-1982), one of Britain's leading railway historians, relates the story of 'The Battle of Strome Pier'. The recording was made on board a special excursion train to Kyle of Lochalsh in 1973.

A great demonstration was promised for the following Sunday. They said that three thousand people would be out to disrupt Strome pier. The Home Secretary on the Thursday before the weekend authorised the use of the army and indeed a troop train was despatched from Waverley Station, Edinburgh on the Friday night with seventy soldiers. This troop train was kept at Fort George with an engine and steam on it but not actually used. However, a special train, with a hundred policemen, drawn mainly from the Lanarkshire and Midlothian forces, came up here and arrived at Strome. Well, in the face of such tremendous opposition the Sabbatarians looked on sullenly but did not interrupt as the fish was loaded into the London train on the Sunday afternoon. As a result of this riot, ten men were arrested in the district and were punished eventually in various ways. Four of them worked on the estate of the chairman of the railway; they got the sack. A by-product of this extraordinary event was that when the local volunteer force next met at Strome, (there were seventy members), only four turned up. This was a protest against the use of the army to quell the riot

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The Battle of Strome Pier (2 of 2)

ROSS: Lochalsh

1980s; 1990s

Highland Railway; railways; transport; battles; disputes; riots; Sabbath; religion; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Dingwall & Skye Railway

The Dingwall and Skye Railway was opened in 1870 but only as far as Strome Ferry on Loch Carron. It would be another twenty-seven years before the railway reached the terminus at Kyle of Lochalsh. In this audio extract, John Thomas (1914-1982), one of Britain's leading railway historians, relates the story of 'The Battle of Strome Pier'. The recording was made on board a special excursion train to Kyle of Lochalsh in 1973.<br /> <br /> A great demonstration was promised for the following Sunday. They said that three thousand people would be out to disrupt Strome pier. The Home Secretary on the Thursday before the weekend authorised the use of the army and indeed a troop train was despatched from Waverley Station, Edinburgh on the Friday night with seventy soldiers. This troop train was kept at Fort George with an engine and steam on it but not actually used. However, a special train, with a hundred policemen, drawn mainly from the Lanarkshire and Midlothian forces, came up here and arrived at Strome. Well, in the face of such tremendous opposition the Sabbatarians looked on sullenly but did not interrupt as the fish was loaded into the London train on the Sunday afternoon. As a result of this riot, ten men were arrested in the district and were punished eventually in various ways. Four of them worked on the estate of the chairman of the railway; they got the sack. A by-product of this extraordinary event was that when the local volunteer force next met at Strome, (there were seventy members), only four turned up. This was a protest against the use of the army to quell the riot