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TITLE
From Sea to Sea (19 of 19)
EXTERNAL ID
HC_STS_FROMSEATOSEA_19
DATE OF RECORDING
2001
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Bob Pegg
SOURCE
The Highland Council
ASSET ID
41202
KEYWORDS
canals
waterways
emigration
songs
audio
Kidson Song

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The following extract is taken from 'From Sea to Sea', an audio celebration of the history, people, landscape and culture of the Great Glen waterway - The Caledonian Canal. The project was created in 2001 by Bob Pegg and funded by Highland Council through the British Waterways 'Living Waterways Programme'.

Narrator: In 1832 another bard stood at Neptune's Staircase to see his brother, Duncan Cameron, board an emigrant ship for Australia. 'I will remember each season what happened this Thursday at Banavie' begins the Gaelic song he later composed. 'Our beloved kindred departing, and the pain of our separation.' For the Great Glen waterway not only brought in new people, and goods, and opportunities, it also, sadly, made it easier for many to leave. A boy, growing up in Fort William in the 1870s remembered the emigrants - the fishermen, the sailors - coming and going from the quayside. And he heard this song brought alive more than a hundred years later by children from Caol Primary School.

'Willie Cameron took a notion
For to go to sail at sea
And to leave his own, dear Annie
Weeping on Fort William quay

I will buy you beads and earrings
I will buy you a diamond stone
I will buy you a horse to ride on
When your baby's dead and gone

What care I for beads and earrings
What care I for a diamond stone
What care I for a horse to ride on
When my baby's dead and gone

Willie Cameron took a notion
For to go to sail at sea
And to leave his own, dear Annie
Weeping on Fort William quay'

Narrator: So, what might a young seafarer of Willie Cameron's day have sailed in? To take but one summer - 1839 - over one thousand two hundred vessels passed through the canal. Among them the 'Rob Roy' with passengers from Inverness bound for Glasgow; the 'Nelly' with slates from Eastdale to Dundee; the 'Kitty' with timber from Inverfarigaig to Lochalsh; the 'Isabella' with hazel wands from Temple House to Fisher Row; and the 'Speedwell' bearing whisky and herring from Burghead to Liverpool. Today, the craft and their cargo may have changed but the words of an early tourist guide ring true,

'To sail up the world famous Caledonian Canal is a never to be forgotten experience. The rugged pine-clad hills enfold one in a moving panorama. A wonderful country; awe inspiring in its grandeur.'

And, along with the natural beauty, the Great Glen waterway has long had one other major asset - its people; the labourers who toiled to build it; the communities whose culture flourished along its banks; and the countless sailing crews who have steered a passage through the wilds, from Corpach to Clachnaharry and back again, from sea to sea

[Fiddle]

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From Sea to Sea (19 of 19)

2000s

canals; waterways; emigration; songs; audio; Kidson Song

The Highland Council

The Highland Council: From Sea to Sea

The following extract is taken from 'From Sea to Sea', an audio celebration of the history, people, landscape and culture of the Great Glen waterway - The Caledonian Canal. The project was created in 2001 by Bob Pegg and funded by Highland Council through the British Waterways 'Living Waterways Programme'. <br /> <br /> Narrator: In 1832 another bard stood at Neptune's Staircase to see his brother, Duncan Cameron, board an emigrant ship for Australia. 'I will remember each season what happened this Thursday at Banavie' begins the Gaelic song he later composed. 'Our beloved kindred departing, and the pain of our separation.' For the Great Glen waterway not only brought in new people, and goods, and opportunities, it also, sadly, made it easier for many to leave. A boy, growing up in Fort William in the 1870s remembered the emigrants - the fishermen, the sailors - coming and going from the quayside. And he heard this song brought alive more than a hundred years later by children from Caol Primary School.<br /> <br /> 'Willie Cameron took a notion<br /> For to go to sail at sea <br /> And to leave his own, dear Annie<br /> Weeping on Fort William quay<br /> <br /> I will buy you beads and earrings <br /> I will buy you a diamond stone<br /> I will buy you a horse to ride on<br /> When your baby's dead and gone<br /> <br /> What care I for beads and earrings<br /> What care I for a diamond stone<br /> What care I for a horse to ride on<br /> When my baby's dead and gone<br /> <br /> Willie Cameron took a notion<br /> For to go to sail at sea <br /> And to leave his own, dear Annie<br /> Weeping on Fort William quay'<br /> <br /> Narrator: So, what might a young seafarer of Willie Cameron's day have sailed in? To take but one summer - 1839 - over one thousand two hundred vessels passed through the canal. Among them the 'Rob Roy' with passengers from Inverness bound for Glasgow; the 'Nelly' with slates from Eastdale to Dundee; the 'Kitty' with timber from Inverfarigaig to Lochalsh; the 'Isabella' with hazel wands from Temple House to Fisher Row; and the 'Speedwell' bearing whisky and herring from Burghead to Liverpool. Today, the craft and their cargo may have changed but the words of an early tourist guide ring true,<br /> <br /> 'To sail up the world famous Caledonian Canal is a never to be forgotten experience. The rugged pine-clad hills enfold one in a moving panorama. A wonderful country; awe inspiring in its grandeur.'<br /> <br /> And, along with the natural beauty, the Great Glen waterway has long had one other major asset - its people; the labourers who toiled to build it; the communities whose culture flourished along its banks; and the countless sailing crews who have steered a passage through the wilds, from Corpach to Clachnaharry and back again, from sea to sea<br /> <br /> [Fiddle]