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TITLE
Farm Life on the Lovat Estate (9 of 20)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_COLIN_MACRAE_09
PLACENAME
Hughton
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kiltarlity and Convinth
DATE OF RECORDING
9 March 1982
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Colin Macrae
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41215
KEYWORDS
audios
estates
farms

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Colin Macrae was born and brought up on the Lovat Estate, at Hughton, Eilean Aigas, near Beauly. His family were farmers for the Lovat Estate.

In this audio extract Colin talks about the rough metal roads in the area.

Interviewer: What, what were the roads like?

Colin: Oh, they were just, they were just rough metal. They weren't tarred, you know? They were just eh, just rough metal, you know, the, the stone would be broken. There used to be, at the roadsides, what we used to term the sess, a 'sess', there was a place cut out, and they'd have the stones and the stonebreaker would come and break the stones with a, just a hammer, you know? Hammer - different sizes of hammers and, and then, when the, they would come and spread the stones over the, over the road and the tract- the engine would come, the road roller would come and, and eh, roll it in. And then they would put sand or grit over it and there were a watering cart, this is a big cart, it was like a container for holding water in it, you see, and the water dribbled out at the end, you know, and that washed the sand inbetween the stones to firm it, you see? That's before they started using the tar macadam. Yes, every, on the roads like, there was always what we termed was the roadman. That would be a local fellow, you know, and he would have a, a stretch of road to look after perhaps, anything to eight or nine miles. And he used to be, he had the responsibility for paying for the stonebreakers that would come round about, you know, and perhaps it would be, very often it'd just be vagrants, you know, or tramps as we used to call them, but they would spend a week or two. Sometimes, there was occasionally we'd get a local fellow out for a while on it, you know? So this roadman was also, he was responsible for paying that, and also he would get perhaps some of the crofters to go around with their horses and carts and taking the stones to spread it on the road, you see? And he was always responsible - it was paid for by the County Council - but he was the, the man responsible for seeing that it was done, you see? Mmm-hmm.

(Image - A Stretch of the River Beauly with Eilean Aigas on the Left © Copyright Stanley Howe, licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence 2.0)

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Farm Life on the Lovat Estate (9 of 20)

INVERNESS: Kiltarlity and Convinth

1980s

audios; estates; farms;

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Farming at Eilean Aigas

Colin Macrae was born and brought up on the Lovat Estate, at Hughton, Eilean Aigas, near Beauly. His family were farmers for the Lovat Estate.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract Colin talks about the rough metal roads in the area.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What, what were the roads like?<br /> <br /> Colin: Oh, they were just, they were just rough metal. They weren't tarred, you know? They were just eh, just rough metal, you know, the, the stone would be broken. There used to be, at the roadsides, what we used to term the sess, a 'sess', there was a place cut out, and they'd have the stones and the stonebreaker would come and break the stones with a, just a hammer, you know? Hammer - different sizes of hammers and, and then, when the, they would come and spread the stones over the, over the road and the tract- the engine would come, the road roller would come and, and eh, roll it in. And then they would put sand or grit over it and there were a watering cart, this is a big cart, it was like a container for holding water in it, you see, and the water dribbled out at the end, you know, and that washed the sand inbetween the stones to firm it, you see? That's before they started using the tar macadam. Yes, every, on the roads like, there was always what we termed was the roadman. That would be a local fellow, you know, and he would have a, a stretch of road to look after perhaps, anything to eight or nine miles. And he used to be, he had the responsibility for paying for the stonebreakers that would come round about, you know, and perhaps it would be, very often it'd just be vagrants, you know, or tramps as we used to call them, but they would spend a week or two. Sometimes, there was occasionally we'd get a local fellow out for a while on it, you know? So this roadman was also, he was responsible for paying that, and also he would get perhaps some of the crofters to go around with their horses and carts and taking the stones to spread it on the road, you see? And he was always responsible - it was paid for by the County Council - but he was the, the man responsible for seeing that it was done, you see? Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> (Image - A Stretch of the River Beauly with Eilean Aigas on the Left © Copyright Stanley Howe, licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence 2.0)