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TITLE
Life on Buntait Farm, Glen Urquhart (2 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_MARY_MACDONALD_02
PLACENAME
Buntait
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kiltarlity and Convinth
DATE OF RECORDING
19 March 1982
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Mary MacDonald
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41236
KEYWORDS
audios
farmers
farming

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Mary MacDonald was born and brought up on Buntait Farm on the Chisholm Estate, Glen Urquhart. In this audio extract she talks about the farm boundaries, farm drainage, livestock and droving. She mentions the drover, Ian MacDonald, from Glen Urquhart.

It has recently been brought to our attention that the grand-daughter, and great-grandaughter, of Mr Peter Grant (the author mentioned below in the transcription) are still resident in Lewiston at this time (November, 2010). Mr Grant's grand-daughter is aged 91. We are grateful to Mr Patrick Grant for this information.

Interviewer: How were the farm boundaries marked out?

Mary: Well, by fences mostly, and even out on the hill, on the hill ground, there were a lot of fencing there. It wasn't common grazing as you would find in crofting communities.

Interviewer: What about drainage of the ground?

Mary: There wasn't a lot of draining needed, not in that area but there were some farms drains. I think old stone drains would have been the thing.

Interviewer: What kind of livestock were kept?

Mary: Livewtock. Well, sheep, of course, and some cattle. The sheep were mainly of, in Buntait anyway, they were of the Cheviot breed. And the cattle, mixed variety. As far as I can remember the cattle, the calves, were not sold in the market in Inverness as they are now; the dealers came round and bought the cattle on the farms, or crofts and then their men came and collected them up into a large drove and took them away to be sold. Well, a lot of them went to Falkirk, I understand, to the markets there. And in fact, a man who lived at Drumnadrochit wrote a book about droving, about a drover who was supposed to have gone from Glen Urquhart down to Falkirk, and in the end he went to South America with the cattle. He stayed there for some time and then came back to his home in Bunloit where his widowed mother lived. It's a romance, really, but I think it was based on fact and the name of the book was 'Ian MacDonald from Glenurquhart'. It was a Mr Grant was the name of the author and until very recently some of his descendants were still living in Lewiston, beside, near Drumnadrochit.

(Image - Buntait from Corrimony © Copyright Angie, licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence 2.0)

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Life on Buntait Farm, Glen Urquhart (2 of 16)

INVERNESS: Kiltarlity and Convinth

1980s

audios; farmers; farming;

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Life on Buntait Farm

Mary MacDonald was born and brought up on Buntait Farm on the Chisholm Estate, Glen Urquhart. In this audio extract she talks about the farm boundaries, farm drainage, livestock and droving. She mentions the drover, Ian MacDonald, from Glen Urquhart. <br /> <br /> It has recently been brought to our attention that the grand-daughter, and great-grandaughter, of Mr Peter Grant (the author mentioned below in the transcription) are still resident in Lewiston at this time (November, 2010). Mr Grant's grand-daughter is aged 91. We are grateful to Mr Patrick Grant for this information.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How were the farm boundaries marked out?<br /> <br /> Mary: Well, by fences mostly, and even out on the hill, on the hill ground, there were a lot of fencing there. It wasn't common grazing as you would find in crofting communities.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What about drainage of the ground?<br /> <br /> Mary: There wasn't a lot of draining needed, not in that area but there were some farms drains. I think old stone drains would have been the thing.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What kind of livestock were kept?<br /> <br /> Mary: Livewtock. Well, sheep, of course, and some cattle. The sheep were mainly of, in Buntait anyway, they were of the Cheviot breed. And the cattle, mixed variety. As far as I can remember the cattle, the calves, were not sold in the market in Inverness as they are now; the dealers came round and bought the cattle on the farms, or crofts and then their men came and collected them up into a large drove and took them away to be sold. Well, a lot of them went to Falkirk, I understand, to the markets there. And in fact, a man who lived at Drumnadrochit wrote a book about droving, about a drover who was supposed to have gone from Glen Urquhart down to Falkirk, and in the end he went to South America with the cattle. He stayed there for some time and then came back to his home in Bunloit where his widowed mother lived. It's a romance, really, but I think it was based on fact and the name of the book was 'Ian MacDonald from Glenurquhart'. It was a Mr Grant was the name of the author and until very recently some of his descendants were still living in Lewiston, beside, near Drumnadrochit.<br /> <br /> (Image - Buntait from Corrimony © Copyright Angie, licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence 2.0)