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TITLE
Life on Buntait Farm, Glen Urquhart (3 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_MARY_MACDONALD_03
PLACENAME
Buntait
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kiltarlity and Convinth
DATE OF RECORDING
19 March 1982
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Mary MacDonald
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41237
KEYWORDS
audios
farmers
farming

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Mary MacDonald was born and brought up on Buntait Farm on the Chisholm Estate, Glen Urquhart. In this audio extract she talks about sheep droving from Glen Urquhart to the market at Inverness, and cattle droving in Ross-shire and Inverness-shire.

Mary: Now the sheep were, seem to be, or the lambs it would be, seem to have been sold in Inverness, mostly, and the farmers or crofters took them by road to Inverness. And I remember my father talking about it; he, I think he must have done a, quite a long journey because he seemed to walk them as far as Dunain the day before the sale and stayed overnight at a farm there at Lower Dunain and then went into town the next day to the market with them. At least I think he must have done all the way from Buntait to Dunain in one day because I never heard him say anything about staying overnight anywhere else in between.

My father-in-law used to drove cattle for a dealer and he had many stories to tell about his experiences but he never travelled as far as Falkirk; his droving seemed to be locally Inverness-shire and perhaps Ross-shire. He had one amusing story he used to tell about a journey when somewhere, he was somewhere between Fort Augustus and Invermoriston I think it was, he and another drover, and they seemed to just bed down at night at the side of the road, and they had their food with them, and during the night he heard some sort of rustling near his bivouac, or whatever you'd like to call it, and he woke his companion and said, 'What's that?' and [his] companion said, 'Oh, it's nothing'. Heard it again but, 'No, it's nothing'. They went back to sleep and in the morning he opened his lunchbag to have some breakfast and there was a loaf in it and he found that a mouse had eaten a hole right through the loaf!

(Image - Buntait from Corrimony © Copyright Angie, licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence 2.0)

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Life on Buntait Farm, Glen Urquhart (3 of 16)

INVERNESS: Kiltarlity and Convinth

1980s

audios; farmers; farming;

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Life on Buntait Farm

Mary MacDonald was born and brought up on Buntait Farm on the Chisholm Estate, Glen Urquhart. In this audio extract she talks about sheep droving from Glen Urquhart to the market at Inverness, and cattle droving in Ross-shire and Inverness-shire.<br /> <br /> Mary: Now the sheep were, seem to be, or the lambs it would be, seem to have been sold in Inverness, mostly, and the farmers or crofters took them by road to Inverness. And I remember my father talking about it; he, I think he must have done a, quite a long journey because he seemed to walk them as far as Dunain the day before the sale and stayed overnight at a farm there at Lower Dunain and then went into town the next day to the market with them. At least I think he must have done all the way from Buntait to Dunain in one day because I never heard him say anything about staying overnight anywhere else in between.<br /> <br /> My father-in-law used to drove cattle for a dealer and he had many stories to tell about his experiences but he never travelled as far as Falkirk; his droving seemed to be locally Inverness-shire and perhaps Ross-shire. He had one amusing story he used to tell about a journey when somewhere, he was somewhere between Fort Augustus and Invermoriston I think it was, he and another drover, and they seemed to just bed down at night at the side of the road, and they had their food with them, and during the night he heard some sort of rustling near his bivouac, or whatever you'd like to call it, and he woke his companion and said, 'What's that?' and [his] companion said, 'Oh, it's nothing'. Heard it again but, 'No, it's nothing'. They went back to sleep and in the morning he opened his lunchbag to have some breakfast and there was a loaf in it and he found that a mouse had eaten a hole right through the loaf!<br /> <br /> (Image - Buntait from Corrimony © Copyright Angie, licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence 2.0)