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TITLE
Life on Buntait Farm, Glen Urquhart (5 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_MARY_MACDONALD_05
PLACENAME
Buntait
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kiltarlity and Convinth
DATE OF RECORDING
19 March 1982
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Mary MacDonald
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41239
KEYWORDS
audios
farmers
farming

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Mary MacDonald was born and brought up on Buntait Farm on the Chisholm Estate, Glen Urquhart. In this audio extract she talks about various farm livestock including pigs, sheep, poultry and horses. She recalls that horses were used to transport coal from Temple Pier, Loch Ness, to various points in Glen Urquhart.

Interviewer: What other animals were kept on the farm?

Mary: Well, most people kept pigs, and when I say pigs, sows, breeding pigs, and people also, most people killed the odd pig for their own use, and salted the meat, and so forth. And they also did the same with sheep, of course. Sheep were butchered for the family's use and I think probably mutton was salted as well; there were no deep freezes in those days. Poultry, of course, and indeed a lot of people who didn't actually have land kept a few hens. And the farm work was done by horses and, of course, with the sheep, sheepdogs were an integral part of the establishment.

Interviewer: What work on the farm would the horses do?

Mary: Well, they did all the ploughing and harrowing and literally all the heavy work; carting. I mean, I never heard of, I suppose, we, further back they might have done something with the oxen but I don't know how far back that would have been. And, for instance, the horses were used to take coal to the outlying areas. The coal came into Temple Pier in boats and the farmers then hauled the coal to the various places to the estates and such like. In some cases the farmers were hiring out their horses to do this on, sort of day's pay, for taking load of coal from Temple Pier to various points in the glen.

(Image - Buntait from Corrimony © Copyright Angie, licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence 2.0)

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Life on Buntait Farm, Glen Urquhart (5 of 16)

INVERNESS: Kiltarlity and Convinth

1980s

audios; farmers; farming;

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Life on Buntait Farm

Mary MacDonald was born and brought up on Buntait Farm on the Chisholm Estate, Glen Urquhart. In this audio extract she talks about various farm livestock including pigs, sheep, poultry and horses. She recalls that horses were used to transport coal from Temple Pier, Loch Ness, to various points in Glen Urquhart.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What other animals were kept on the farm?<br /> <br /> Mary: Well, most people kept pigs, and when I say pigs, sows, breeding pigs, and people also, most people killed the odd pig for their own use, and salted the meat, and so forth. And they also did the same with sheep, of course. Sheep were butchered for the family's use and I think probably mutton was salted as well; there were no deep freezes in those days. Poultry, of course, and indeed a lot of people who didn't actually have land kept a few hens. And the farm work was done by horses and, of course, with the sheep, sheepdogs were an integral part of the establishment.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What work on the farm would the horses do?<br /> <br /> Mary: Well, they did all the ploughing and harrowing and literally all the heavy work; carting. I mean, I never heard of, I suppose, we, further back they might have done something with the oxen but I don't know how far back that would have been. And, for instance, the horses were used to take coal to the outlying areas. The coal came into Temple Pier in boats and the farmers then hauled the coal to the various places to the estates and such like. In some cases the farmers were hiring out their horses to do this on, sort of day's pay, for taking load of coal from Temple Pier to various points in the glen.<br /> <br /> (Image - Buntait from Corrimony © Copyright Angie, licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence 2.0)