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TITLE
Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (1 of 25)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_ROSIE_CAMPBELL_01
PLACENAME
Crathie
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Laggan
DATE OF RECORDING
7 December 1983
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Rosie Campbell
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41251
KEYWORDS
deserted townships
crofters
crofts
crofting
buildings
croft houses
audios

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Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families.

Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie describes some of the buildings in Crathie.

(Image - Ruins at Crathie, as seen from the Glen Markie road. © Copyright Richard Webb, licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence 2.0)


'Interviewer: We've got a map here of Crathie and we've identified the various houses, so, I'd like to just have an imaginary walk around Crathie as you remember it; each individual house, and if you could try to describe each of these houses as you remember them. Now, we'll go up the road first to Balmishaig [Ballmishaig] and the MacDougalls, I believe, lived there.

Mr MacDougall was quite a bit older than his wife - his wife was quite a bit younger - and they had two of a family, Duncan and Jean. Also in the household was an uncle and he was also Duncan MacDougall. The house had an upstairs in it, and a room to the right and the left as you went in the door. The kitchen was, as most of the Crathie houses were at that time, was papered, walls were papered, and the settle was in the window, and the white scrubbed table, the ordinary chairs round it. The floor was of concrete, with linoleum on it, and rugs, and a very warm house on a cold night and that. No water in it.

Interviewer: What was the fireplace like?

The fireplace, I think, was the old fashioned, the fireplace with the hook in it and it was a sort of black grate and an oven at the right hand side.

Interviewer: It didn't have a wooded chimney, this one?

No, no.

Interviewer: Was it in the gable end?

It was at the gable end of that house, yes. And there was a closet off the kitchen, right in the middle of the house it would be.

Interviewer: What kind of roof did it have?

A tarred roof.

Interviewer: Felt, with felt?

Tarred and whitewashed outside.

Interviewer: Fine, now we'll move up from Balmishaig. That was the only house you remember in Balmishaig?

Yes, and then their steading was across the burn...

Interviewer: Ah yes.

...there and where the cows were, and of course they'd cows and calves and sheep.

Interviewer: Did they have a fank there, do you remember?

Well, you see, it was the one fank did everything, in Glen Markie, because it was a community sheep stock; they all had their own mark, but it was a sheep stock that was there.

Interviewer: So they would have gardens in front of the houses?

They had, yes, gardens, and very good gardens, with berry bushes in it and that, and I always mind plenty rhubarb and plenty berries there. And there was an apple tree and there was a rowan tree, in it I can remember rightly.

Interviewer: Right

There was a knoll just to the back of the house where the children congregated and played; a knoll behind the house.

Interviewer: There's a big rock, actually, the other side of the burn from their house. Is that, did they play on that?

Yes, sometimes, behind the steading, over from the steading. Yes, yes. And we played in the burn. Used to have, making boats out of old raft and things and tried to go down the burn on them.'

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Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (1 of 25)

INVERNESS: Laggan

1980s

deserted townships; crofters; crofts; crofting; buildings; croft houses; audios

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Crathie Township

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families. <br /> <br /> Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie describes some of the buildings in Crathie.<br /> <br /> (Image - Ruins at Crathie, as seen from the Glen Markie road. © Copyright Richard Webb, licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence 2.0)<br /> <br /> <br /> 'Interviewer: We've got a map here of Crathie and we've identified the various houses, so, I'd like to just have an imaginary walk around Crathie as you remember it; each individual house, and if you could try to describe each of these houses as you remember them. Now, we'll go up the road first to Balmishaig [Ballmishaig] and the MacDougalls, I believe, lived there.<br /> <br /> Mr MacDougall was quite a bit older than his wife - his wife was quite a bit younger - and they had two of a family, Duncan and Jean. Also in the household was an uncle and he was also Duncan MacDougall. The house had an upstairs in it, and a room to the right and the left as you went in the door. The kitchen was, as most of the Crathie houses were at that time, was papered, walls were papered, and the settle was in the window, and the white scrubbed table, the ordinary chairs round it. The floor was of concrete, with linoleum on it, and rugs, and a very warm house on a cold night and that. No water in it.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What was the fireplace like?<br /> <br /> The fireplace, I think, was the old fashioned, the fireplace with the hook in it and it was a sort of black grate and an oven at the right hand side.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: It didn't have a wooded chimney, this one?<br /> <br /> No, no.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Was it in the gable end?<br /> <br /> It was at the gable end of that house, yes. And there was a closet off the kitchen, right in the middle of the house it would be.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What kind of roof did it have?<br /> <br /> A tarred roof.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Felt, with felt?<br /> <br /> Tarred and whitewashed outside.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Fine, now we'll move up from Balmishaig. That was the only house you remember in Balmishaig?<br /> <br /> Yes, and then their steading was across the burn...<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Ah yes.<br /> <br /> ...there and where the cows were, and of course they'd cows and calves and sheep.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did they have a fank there, do you remember?<br /> <br /> Well, you see, it was the one fank did everything, in Glen Markie, because it was a community sheep stock; they all had their own mark, but it was a sheep stock that was there.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So they would have gardens in front of the houses?<br /> <br /> They had, yes, gardens, and very good gardens, with berry bushes in it and that, and I always mind plenty rhubarb and plenty berries there. And there was an apple tree and there was a rowan tree, in it I can remember rightly.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Right<br /> <br /> There was a knoll just to the back of the house where the children congregated and played; a knoll behind the house.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: There's a big rock, actually, the other side of the burn from their house. Is that, did they play on that?<br /> <br /> Yes, sometimes, behind the steading, over from the steading. Yes, yes. And we played in the burn. Used to have, making boats out of old raft and things and tried to go down the burn on them.'