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TITLE
Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (2 of 25)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_ROSIE_CAMPBELL_02
PLACENAME
Crathie
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Laggan
DATE OF RECORDING
7 December 1983
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Rosie Campbell
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41252
KEYWORDS
deserted townships
crofts
crofting
buildings
croft houses
crofters
audios

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Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families.

Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie remembers Charlie Ogg's house. (Charlie was Maggie MacPherson's father.)

(Image - Ruins at Crathie)

'Interviewer: Right, now let's go further up to the house which, we know, is Charlie Ogg's house.

Yes.

Interviewer: What do you remember of that house?

Well, I've stayed there. Again, it was two rooms. One, in fact, that house was more; there was three rooms. There was one to the, your right, as you came in, in the passage, and the ladder went up, there, at the foot of the passage, went up, upstairs and there was two long rooms up there. And, in the kit-, there was a kitchen, and then there was a bedroom off the kitchen, there in it. And it was furnished; as you came in the door you were facing the fireplace, and, on the left hand side was the waggity-wa clock, and the violin hanging on the wall beside it. And then the window - the wall was very thick - and it was a little window, and the chanter always was on the window. The settle was in front of the window, and in front of that was again the scrubbed table and the chairs round it, four chairs round it.

At the side of the fireplace there was a chair with the arms, the old-fashioned wooden chair with arms, and there was always cushions on it. And on the other, some of the other chairs there - different places for sitting - there was cushions on them. The box-bed was just as you came in the door like that corner and it had curtains round it. At the head of the box-bed there was a wooden stools where you had the water for washing your hands and that, in these basins there, and a towel and things that hang there, and on the other wall here there was the old-fashioned dresser where the pails of water sat in below. There was three drawers, and then the dishes were all - first the porridge bowls sitting, and then the cream bowls sitting on top of them upsides down. Then, in the racks was the different plates; bread plates and things were there. There was a cupboard in the corner where more food, dishes and that, were kept. And then on this side of the dresser there was the meal girnal which always had a bowl of flour and a bowl of oatmeal in it - it was never empty - there, and from there you passed the fireplace to go into the bedroom, on the other side.'

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Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (2 of 25)

INVERNESS: Laggan

1980s

deserted townships; crofts; crofting; buildings; croft houses; crofters; audios

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Crathie Township

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families. <br /> <br /> Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie remembers Charlie Ogg's house. (Charlie was Maggie MacPherson's father.)<br /> <br /> (Image - Ruins at Crathie)<br /> <br /> 'Interviewer: Right, now let's go further up to the house which, we know, is Charlie Ogg's house.<br /> <br /> Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What do you remember of that house?<br /> <br /> Well, I've stayed there. Again, it was two rooms. One, in fact, that house was more; there was three rooms. There was one to the, your right, as you came in, in the passage, and the ladder went up, there, at the foot of the passage, went up, upstairs and there was two long rooms up there. And, in the kit-, there was a kitchen, and then there was a bedroom off the kitchen, there in it. And it was furnished; as you came in the door you were facing the fireplace, and, on the left hand side was the waggity-wa clock, and the violin hanging on the wall beside it. And then the window - the wall was very thick - and it was a little window, and the chanter always was on the window. The settle was in front of the window, and in front of that was again the scrubbed table and the chairs round it, four chairs round it. <br /> <br /> At the side of the fireplace there was a chair with the arms, the old-fashioned wooden chair with arms, and there was always cushions on it. And on the other, some of the other chairs there - different places for sitting - there was cushions on them. The box-bed was just as you came in the door like that corner and it had curtains round it. At the head of the box-bed there was a wooden stools where you had the water for washing your hands and that, in these basins there, and a towel and things that hang there, and on the other wall here there was the old-fashioned dresser where the pails of water sat in below. There was three drawers, and then the dishes were all - first the porridge bowls sitting, and then the cream bowls sitting on top of them upsides down. Then, in the racks was the different plates; bread plates and things were there. There was a cupboard in the corner where more food, dishes and that, were kept. And then on this side of the dresser there was the meal girnal which always had a bowl of flour and a bowl of oatmeal in it - it was never empty - there, and from there you passed the fireplace to go into the bedroom, on the other side.'