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TITLE
Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (3 of 25)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_ROSIE_CAMPBELL_03
PLACENAME
Crathie
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Laggan
DATE OF RECORDING
7 December 1983
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Rosie Campbell
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41253
KEYWORDS
deserted townships
crofts
crofting
buildings
croft houses
crofters
audios

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Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families.

Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie remembers Charlie Ogg's house. (Charlie was Maggie MacPherson's father.)

(Image - Ruins at Crathie)

'Interviewer: Can you remember about the fireplace?

Yes, the fireplace had the chain and the hook hanging down and the, the, you could sit on the kerb that was in front of it was stones, and it was [built?] up three bars in the fireplace, and quite big hobs on each side that you could put pans on for boiling that on, there was always a kettle sitting boiling, black polished kettle sitting boiling. And there was a three-legged pot somewhere about, I remember, yes.

Interviewer: And the chimney?

The chimney came out from the wall, for the smoke, but when you stepped inside on the kerb you could s-, look outside, and I'm sure the top of the chimney must have been about eighteen inches square.

Interviewer: It was a wooden chimney?

It was a wooden, yes, well, that part of it in the house was wooden and it was all papered. And usually the paper that was on it was an imitation of wood, that varnished paper was on it, and it was all papered like that. The bedroom, going through to the bedroom, there was the bed, the double bed of mahogany wood - I can always remember that - and dressing table and odds and ends. I just can't [?] to mind - photographs and things were about the, were about there - and there was a window looked out down on the, right on over to the toon, actually.

Interviewer: What kind of lighting did they have?

Paraffin lamps, yes, wall-back lamps they hang on the walls, yes. And in the bedroom it was a candle, yes.

Interviewer: And upstairs, what was it like?

Upstairs, again, it was the beds were at each end, as you were saying. The usual, a chair and some of things about and the floors were covered with rugs and that there too.

Interviewer; Did it-? You said you went up a ladder to the upstairs. Was the ladder always, permanently in the hall or did you have to erect it to get?

No, it was always standing against the wall; you just pulled it out, and you could walk straight out. As far as I, I think it was on hinges to the wall and you just took it out a certain bit, you see; you could go up on it. There was quite a, the trap was quite big; it was quite a big trap. It had to be to let big Charlie up.'

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Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (3 of 25)

INVERNESS: Laggan

1980s

deserted townships; crofts; crofting; buildings; croft houses; crofters; audios

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Crathie Township

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families. <br /> <br /> Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie remembers Charlie Ogg's house. (Charlie was Maggie MacPherson's father.)<br /> <br /> (Image - Ruins at Crathie)<br /> <br /> 'Interviewer: Can you remember about the fireplace?<br /> <br /> Yes, the fireplace had the chain and the hook hanging down and the, the, you could sit on the kerb that was in front of it was stones, and it was [built?] up three bars in the fireplace, and quite big hobs on each side that you could put pans on for boiling that on, there was always a kettle sitting boiling, black polished kettle sitting boiling. And there was a three-legged pot somewhere about, I remember, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And the chimney?<br /> <br /> The chimney came out from the wall, for the smoke, but when you stepped inside on the kerb you could s-, look outside, and I'm sure the top of the chimney must have been about eighteen inches square.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: It was a wooden chimney?<br /> <br /> It was a wooden, yes, well, that part of it in the house was wooden and it was all papered. And usually the paper that was on it was an imitation of wood, that varnished paper was on it, and it was all papered like that. The bedroom, going through to the bedroom, there was the bed, the double bed of mahogany wood - I can always remember that - and dressing table and odds and ends. I just can't [?] to mind - photographs and things were about the, were about there - and there was a window looked out down on the, right on over to the toon, actually.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What kind of lighting did they have? <br /> <br /> Paraffin lamps, yes, wall-back lamps they hang on the walls, yes. And in the bedroom it was a candle, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And upstairs, what was it like?<br /> <br /> Upstairs, again, it was the beds were at each end, as you were saying. The usual, a chair and some of things about and the floors were covered with rugs and that there too.<br /> <br /> Interviewer; Did it-? You said you went up a ladder to the upstairs. Was the ladder always, permanently in the hall or did you have to erect it to get?<br /> <br /> No, it was always standing against the wall; you just pulled it out, and you could walk straight out. As far as I, I think it was on hinges to the wall and you just took it out a certain bit, you see; you could go up on it. There was quite a, the trap was quite big; it was quite a big trap. It had to be to let big Charlie up.'