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TITLE
Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (7 of 25)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_ROSIE_CAMPBELL_07
PLACENAME
Crathie
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Laggan
DATE OF RECORDING
7 December 1983
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Rosie Campbell
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41257
KEYWORDS
deserted townships
crofts
crofting
buildings
croft houses
crofters
audios

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Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families.

Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie describes Archie MacDonald's house.

(Image - Ruins at Crathie)

'Interviewer: Right, now we'll move back across the Markie again and come down beside the river to Archie MacDonald's house.

Yes, Balmellie.

Interviewer: That's right.

Yes.

Interviewer: Now what do you remember about this house?

Well, his house was again was a thatched house, white outside, and again there was a lot of flags and stones in front of it which were kept very - not a weed to be seen, and very, very tidy; everything about it was very tidy. And his old mother lived with him who was very old - I don't know how old - but very old at that time. She wore a mutch, and she always sat at the fire. And his cousin, Hilda MacDonald, kept house to him, and the - It was again very, very particularly clean kept house; it was whitewashed right round for a foot about round the floor, was off it, was whitewashed. And the fireplace was white - just the bit going up again was the old chain coming down and the hook and that. And I also remember the stool sort of half-moon shaped, not quite, but, something, you know just an ordinary stool that had been placed there that happened to have that shape to it. And the inglenook there and the pans would be sitting; the kettle always on the boil at the fire. And there was the settle, again, in that house, and the table again white - again, like all the other tables, all wood scrubbed pure white. The chairs round the table were the same. And then, on each side of the fireplace there was one of the old-fashioned chairs so they - wooden chairs with the arms, and cushions on them, at each side of the fireplace. And they had also one of these dressers with the dishes on them. Can't remember where the water was kept in that house; it wasn't certainly under there.

Interviewer: Did they have curtains on the windows?

Well, it were again very small windows, but there was net, little net just that you could see through curtains but very, very small windows, but they all had curtains, curtains that they could pull over at night, you know, just sort of pulled over at night, and they usually were the colour of their cushion covers.

Interviewer: Did they - was there an upstairs in that house?

No, I don't think so. It was a three-roomed house again because there was a room through, I know, and another room through that.

Interviewer: The gable end facing the river has a little window in it, at a very high level and...

Yes, I remember that now. Yes, it was very high, that one, that window, and the old lady - and it was a very hospital [hospitable] house too; everybody that went it, first thing you got was a cup of tea, or a glass of cream. I can always remember that. [You were] made very much at home in it.'

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Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (7 of 25)

INVERNESS: Laggan

1980s

deserted townships; crofts; crofting; buildings; croft houses; crofters; audios

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Crathie Township

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families. <br /> <br /> Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie describes Archie MacDonald's house.<br /> <br /> (Image - Ruins at Crathie)<br /> <br /> 'Interviewer: Right, now we'll move back across the Markie again and come down beside the river to Archie MacDonald's house.<br /> <br /> Yes, Balmellie.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: That's right.<br /> <br /> Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now what do you remember about this house?<br /> <br /> Well, his house was again was a thatched house, white outside, and again there was a lot of flags and stones in front of it which were kept very - not a weed to be seen, and very, very tidy; everything about it was very tidy. And his old mother lived with him who was very old - I don't know how old - but very old at that time. She wore a mutch, and she always sat at the fire. And his cousin, Hilda MacDonald, kept house to him, and the - It was again very, very particularly clean kept house; it was whitewashed right round for a foot about round the floor, was off it, was whitewashed. And the fireplace was white - just the bit going up again was the old chain coming down and the hook and that. And I also remember the stool sort of half-moon shaped, not quite, but, something, you know just an ordinary stool that had been placed there that happened to have that shape to it. And the inglenook there and the pans would be sitting; the kettle always on the boil at the fire. And there was the settle, again, in that house, and the table again white - again, like all the other tables, all wood scrubbed pure white. The chairs round the table were the same. And then, on each side of the fireplace there was one of the old-fashioned chairs so they - wooden chairs with the arms, and cushions on them, at each side of the fireplace. And they had also one of these dressers with the dishes on them. Can't remember where the water was kept in that house; it wasn't certainly under there.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did they have curtains on the windows?<br /> <br /> Well, it were again very small windows, but there was net, little net just that you could see through curtains but very, very small windows, but they all had curtains, curtains that they could pull over at night, you know, just sort of pulled over at night, and they usually were the colour of their cushion covers.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did they - was there an upstairs in that house?<br /> <br /> No, I don't think so. It was a three-roomed house again because there was a room through, I know, and another room through that.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The gable end facing the river has a little window in it, at a very high level and...<br /> <br /> Yes, I remember that now. Yes, it was very high, that one, that window, and the old lady - and it was a very hospital [hospitable] house too; everybody that went it, first thing you got was a cup of tea, or a glass of cream. I can always remember that. [You were] made very much at home in it.'