Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (8 of 25)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_ROSIE_CAMPBELL_08
PLACENAME
Crathie
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Laggan
DATE OF RECORDING
7 December 1983
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Rosie Campbell
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41258
KEYWORDS
deserted townships
crofts
crofting
buildings
croft houses
crofters
audios

Get Adobe Flash player

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families.

Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie remembers a local dance.

(Image - Ruins at Crathie)

'One day, I was over at the chapel with Maggie MacPherson, and the priest at that time was Father MacDonald, and he had two sisters that kept house to him, and they were Bradys; Bella Brady was the housekeeper and her sister, Polly. And they of course both spoke Gaelic as well as they were from the Islands, and Gaelic was spoken there quite a lot. And we were coming over, just coming down towards the bridge, and we were looking over at Archie's new barn when one of them said, 'Wouldn't be an idea if we got Archie to hold a dance in the barn and we could - to open the barn?' And, instead of the girls going back to the house, they all carried on to Archie's and asked him there and then, and he would need to go in and ask his mother, if she would approve of this, and she was, did. And there and then it was arranged that a dance would take place.

And the people from the Glen and Loch Laggan and down Laggan Bridge were all - it was an open invitation for them to come to it. And I myself must just have been about between five and six at the time and I went - stayed the night at Crathie and so did my sister Bertha. We stayed the night but our brother cycled up and he cycled back, along with a lot of others that did the same.

The tea was made in the house and the old granny sat up all night keeping the fire on and keeping the kettles boiled, and it was all homemade baking like pancakes, scones, oatcakes and cheese and things; there was some sandwiches. And we'd a very jolly night and the music was supplied by Alec Macrae, from Balgowan, and his brother, Jimmy, and his brother Willie, with [?] and old Andrew MacDonald from Ravenswood in Kinlochlaggan, with his concertina.

The dance went on until near five in the morning and, by this time, Mr Andrew MacDonald was getting in very good form and he lifted me up and put me on his shoulder, with my legs round each of his, round each shoulder, and held me with one huge hand - he was a huge man - and he marched round the hall, and said to everybody that he thought it was time that the dance was coming to an end, as it was getting the early hours of the morning, and that his little friend Rosie was getting sleepy, so he thought we should bring it to a halt!'

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (8 of 25)

INVERNESS: Laggan

1980s

deserted townships; crofts; crofting; buildings; croft houses; crofters; audios

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Crathie Township

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families. <br /> <br /> Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie remembers a local dance.<br /> <br /> (Image - Ruins at Crathie)<br /> <br /> 'One day, I was over at the chapel with Maggie MacPherson, and the priest at that time was Father MacDonald, and he had two sisters that kept house to him, and they were Bradys; Bella Brady was the housekeeper and her sister, Polly. And they of course both spoke Gaelic as well as they were from the Islands, and Gaelic was spoken there quite a lot. And we were coming over, just coming down towards the bridge, and we were looking over at Archie's new barn when one of them said, 'Wouldn't be an idea if we got Archie to hold a dance in the barn and we could - to open the barn?' And, instead of the girls going back to the house, they all carried on to Archie's and asked him there and then, and he would need to go in and ask his mother, if she would approve of this, and she was, did. And there and then it was arranged that a dance would take place.<br /> <br /> And the people from the Glen and Loch Laggan and down Laggan Bridge were all - it was an open invitation for them to come to it. And I myself must just have been about between five and six at the time and I went - stayed the night at Crathie and so did my sister Bertha. We stayed the night but our brother cycled up and he cycled back, along with a lot of others that did the same.<br /> <br /> The tea was made in the house and the old granny sat up all night keeping the fire on and keeping the kettles boiled, and it was all homemade baking like pancakes, scones, oatcakes and cheese and things; there was some sandwiches. And we'd a very jolly night and the music was supplied by Alec Macrae, from Balgowan, and his brother, Jimmy, and his brother Willie, with [?] and old Andrew MacDonald from Ravenswood in Kinlochlaggan, with his concertina. <br /> <br /> The dance went on until near five in the morning and, by this time, Mr Andrew MacDonald was getting in very good form and he lifted me up and put me on his shoulder, with my legs round each of his, round each shoulder, and held me with one huge hand - he was a huge man - and he marched round the hall, and said to everybody that he thought it was time that the dance was coming to an end, as it was getting the early hours of the morning, and that his little friend Rosie was getting sleepy, so he thought we should bring it to a halt!'