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TITLE
Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (12 of 25)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_ROSIE_CAMPBELL_12
PLACENAME
Crathie
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Laggan
DATE OF RECORDING
7 December 1983
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Rosie Campbell
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41262
KEYWORDS
deserted townships
crofts
crofting
buildings
croft houses
crofters
audios

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Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families.

Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie talks about the local church and religious issues.

(Image - Ruins at Crathie)

'Interviewer: Across the bridge from Crathie was the old St Michael's Roman Catholic Chapel, there.

Yes, yes.

Interviewer: What do you remember about it because it's disappeared?

Well, it was a lovely building, inside and out. Beautiful granite building on the outside, and slated and that. Kept absolutely the last word in being looked after; everything painted. The gate, the road going up, you'd never see weed about it, and lovely garden to the front and to the rear. And the priest always had a housekeeper; they, as far back as I can remember it was Dr, it was the Reverend Father James MacDonald, and he was there for many years. And his housekeepers, Bella and Polly Brady. And the chapel was beautiful inside, very, very nice inside. I've been there, at the chapel, when I was much older. They held - another priest that was there - and they, they had - You see, there was no chapel in Kingussie at this time but a small room, above a house, next door to Rose Cottage. I can't remember the name of the house just now, but it's next door to Rose Cottage, and it was upstair - a room you went up by stone steps to it - and the Kingussie people came up to the chapel in Laggan.

Cars would be getting a little more plentiful by that time, and they had a confirmation up there, and it was held out in the wood, out, just on the - right out from the chapel door on the knoll, there wasn't so many trees there then. And it was held there, I can remember of the confirmation; they had the cross and everything up there, beautifully done with flowers and that. And then we all walked from there down past the chapel and turned along, as if we were going to go down, you know, the little path that goes down by the dam, right on and round, and up onto that knoll, and there was another one up there, and a service was held there too. And we'd been all invited to go, Protestants and all, were invited to go.

Interviewer: So it was a very well attended church?

Well attended chapel. At that time, quite a lot- all these Macdonalds, mostly, were Catholics that was in Crathie and up the glen. In fact, up the glen at that time it was only the keepers that weren't Catholics.

Interviewer: At that time were you very conscious of the families that were Catholic, and who were Protestant?

No, Laggan intermixed. Catholics never came into it. And at school it was the same until a priest came and stopped them. They used to come just with us in the morning and be there for our bible, and they had fast days that we didn't have at that time. But they, actually, this priest stopped them coming in. They didn't have to come in then until ten o'clock, and they weren't in at all when we were having bible then. That was the fact, but by that time we'd only three or four Catholics left in the school. There was quite a number when I went first, and the young people - they'd no difference. We didn't think - the only thing we used to be, [?] they had fast days when we couldn't get off as children. That was really the only thing.'

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Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (12 of 25)

INVERNESS: Laggan

1980s

deserted townships; crofts; crofting; buildings; croft houses; crofters; audios

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Crathie Township

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families. <br /> <br /> Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie talks about the local church and religious issues.<br /> <br /> (Image - Ruins at Crathie)<br /> <br /> 'Interviewer: Across the bridge from Crathie was the old St Michael's Roman Catholic Chapel, there.<br /> <br /> Yes, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What do you remember about it because it's disappeared?<br /> <br /> Well, it was a lovely building, inside and out. Beautiful granite building on the outside, and slated and that. Kept absolutely the last word in being looked after; everything painted. The gate, the road going up, you'd never see weed about it, and lovely garden to the front and to the rear. And the priest always had a housekeeper; they, as far back as I can remember it was Dr, it was the Reverend Father James MacDonald, and he was there for many years. And his housekeepers, Bella and Polly Brady. And the chapel was beautiful inside, very, very nice inside. I've been there, at the chapel, when I was much older. They held - another priest that was there - and they, they had - You see, there was no chapel in Kingussie at this time but a small room, above a house, next door to Rose Cottage. I can't remember the name of the house just now, but it's next door to Rose Cottage, and it was upstair - a room you went up by stone steps to it - and the Kingussie people came up to the chapel in Laggan.<br /> <br /> Cars would be getting a little more plentiful by that time, and they had a confirmation up there, and it was held out in the wood, out, just on the - right out from the chapel door on the knoll, there wasn't so many trees there then. And it was held there, I can remember of the confirmation; they had the cross and everything up there, beautifully done with flowers and that. And then we all walked from there down past the chapel and turned along, as if we were going to go down, you know, the little path that goes down by the dam, right on and round, and up onto that knoll, and there was another one up there, and a service was held there too. And we'd been all invited to go, Protestants and all, were invited to go.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So it was a very well attended church?<br /> <br /> Well attended chapel. At that time, quite a lot- all these Macdonalds, mostly, were Catholics that was in Crathie and up the glen. In fact, up the glen at that time it was only the keepers that weren't Catholics.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: At that time were you very conscious of the families that were Catholic, and who were Protestant?<br /> <br /> No, Laggan intermixed. Catholics never came into it. And at school it was the same until a priest came and stopped them. They used to come just with us in the morning and be there for our bible, and they had fast days that we didn't have at that time. But they, actually, this priest stopped them coming in. They didn't have to come in then until ten o'clock, and they weren't in at all when we were having bible then. That was the fact, but by that time we'd only three or four Catholics left in the school. There was quite a number when I went first, and the young people - they'd no difference. We didn't think - the only thing we used to be, [?] they had fast days when we couldn't get off as children. That was really the only thing.'