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TITLE
Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (13 of 25)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_ROSIE_CAMPBELL_13
PLACENAME
Crathie
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Laggan
DATE OF RECORDING
7 December 1983
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Rosie Campbell
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41263
KEYWORDS
deserted townships
crofts
crofting
buildings
croft houses
crofters
audios

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Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families.

Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie remembers the travelling packmen, including 'Wee MacGregor'.

(Image - Ruins at Crathie)

'We did have packmen that came. Now, we had one that came - he was called John Brown - and he used to have a pony, but latterly he just had a pack. He would come to the - and lived up in the Glen with the Camerons at the barracks - and he would go round selling stuff from his pack.

Interviewer: This would be clothes?

Yes, clothes.

Interviewer: Ready-made clothes?

Ready-made clothes. And Wee MacGregor had a, had a box sort of thing with two bicycle wheels on the front of a bicycle. I've seen them in the towns like that, and he cycled along and the box was the handle-bar grip. Well, he came, quite a long time, and eventually he died in Kingussie. He lived somewhere down, I think, at the dunes, down at the other end of Kingussie, there was sand or something. Down there somewhere he died in - he'd a caravan latterly - he lived there, but as long as he was able, he came to Crathie, and the Glen, and all round, he came with this, and selling clothes to people.

Interviewer: Yes.

He bought quite a lot of his stuff from Frasers of Perth and Kingussie so it was good stuff he had. I could tell you a wee story about that.

Interviewer: Yes.

I always wore a kilt and he used to tease me that I had no sporran. So, one occasion he came up and he had a small, haired white sporran from Kingussie and he give it to me in a present and I went up to Crathie very proud of my sporran on with my kilt. And Charlie, the last Charlie Ogg, made up a recitation:

Wee Rosie Gillies, she's Heiland tae the hilt
She kissed Wee MacGregor for her sporran an her kilt
She robbed him of his whiskers, she left him in a trance
An then off she went tae Crathie, just tae have a dance.

[Laughter]

It was Charlie, last Charlie Ogg that made that up, yes. Because they were making out, you see, it so happened that he had, he had shaved - he had a beard, this - and he had shaved it off from the time he'd been round before, and it was this time I'd got the kilt, so they were making out, you see, that the hair of his sporran, that was in my sporran! Frasers Kingussies' name was stamped on the bott-, back.'

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Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (13 of 25)

INVERNESS: Laggan

1980s

deserted townships; crofts; crofting; buildings; croft houses; crofters; audios

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Crathie Township

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families. <br /> <br /> Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie remembers the travelling packmen, including 'Wee MacGregor'.<br /> <br /> (Image - Ruins at Crathie)<br /> <br /> 'We did have packmen that came. Now, we had one that came - he was called John Brown - and he used to have a pony, but latterly he just had a pack. He would come to the - and lived up in the Glen with the Camerons at the barracks - and he would go round selling stuff from his pack.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: This would be clothes?<br /> <br /> Yes, clothes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Ready-made clothes?<br /> <br /> Ready-made clothes. And Wee MacGregor had a, had a box sort of thing with two bicycle wheels on the front of a bicycle. I've seen them in the towns like that, and he cycled along and the box was the handle-bar grip. Well, he came, quite a long time, and eventually he died in Kingussie. He lived somewhere down, I think, at the dunes, down at the other end of Kingussie, there was sand or something. Down there somewhere he died in - he'd a caravan latterly - he lived there, but as long as he was able, he came to Crathie, and the Glen, and all round, he came with this, and selling clothes to people. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> He bought quite a lot of his stuff from Frasers of Perth and Kingussie so it was good stuff he had. I could tell you a wee story about that.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> I always wore a kilt and he used to tease me that I had no sporran. So, one occasion he came up and he had a small, haired white sporran from Kingussie and he give it to me in a present and I went up to Crathie very proud of my sporran on with my kilt. And Charlie, the last Charlie Ogg, made up a recitation:<br /> <br /> Wee Rosie Gillies, she's Heiland tae the hilt<br /> She kissed Wee MacGregor for her sporran an her kilt<br /> She robbed him of his whiskers, she left him in a trance<br /> An then off she went tae Crathie, just tae have a dance.<br /> <br /> [Laughter]<br /> <br /> It was Charlie, last Charlie Ogg that made that up, yes. Because they were making out, you see, it so happened that he had, he had shaved - he had a beard, this - and he had shaved it off from the time he'd been round before, and it was this time I'd got the kilt, so they were making out, you see, that the hair of his sporran, that was in my sporran! Frasers Kingussies' name was stamped on the bott-, back.'