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TITLE
Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (14 of 25)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_ROSIE_CAMPBELL_14
PLACENAME
Crathie
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Laggan
DATE OF RECORDING
7 December 1983
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Rosie Campbell
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41264
KEYWORDS
deserted townships
crofts
crofting
buildings
croft houses
crofters
audios

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Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families.

Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie remembers washday. She also talks about the various types of food that was eaten by the crofters.

(Image - Ruins at Crathie)

'Interviewer: Can you remember how people washed their clothes, generally, in Crathie?

Well, they all had tubs, the wooden tubs, made out of the half-barrels with the handles on them and they stamped them, with their feet.

Interviewer: Did they make a fire outside?

Yes, they'd a fire - heated their water outside, near their strupa, you see, that they hadn't to carry their water far. It was always lovely weather at that time too.

Interviewer: Can you remember much about - what were the main items of people's diets?

Well, they had, for breakfast it was always porridge. Charlie Ogg always had porridge and honey, the old man, always, and he ate it with a horn spoon. He always did that. And we got cream with our porridge too. The milk came from Allan Macgregor's. I'd go along and get it. They was a wee cream pail, for carrying it back and fore in, and we had our breakfast after I came back. And on Sunday we got boiled eggs. I always remember that. And oatcakes, and their own, their own scones, and pancakes and that was the common, the common. Yes.

Interviewer: Did you find many of them eating meat? Was there - ?

Oh yes. Well, they had, you see, in these days they could kill a sheep if they wanted. Was nothing to stop them and then there was plenty venison always given out by the landlord - Sir John Ramsden - was very good at handing out venison in these days. And the odd one fished and that, themselves. Could do that when the tenants weren't around, they were allowed to fish and things like that.

Interviewer: So you considered that they were well fed?

And rabbits. Rabbits and hares. Oh yes.

Interviewer: Everyone was quite - ?

Oh yes. And, of course, they all had herring, salt herring, as well, yes. They bought their salt herring from the shop and took it home in buckets and pails - so many dozen in a pail - that's the way they took it home. They came with their pails for their herring, yes.

Interviewer: Was there a local source of meal?

Well, they, they put their own meal down to Kingussie, to the mill, to Dallas the miller, and it came back in meal form, meal, yes.

Interviewer: Did many of them make their own cheese?

I can't ever say that I'd seen cheese in Crathie, but they certainly made their own butter and own crowdie, and had plenty of it, and they salted it for the winter.'

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Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (14 of 25)

INVERNESS: Laggan

1980s

deserted townships; crofts; crofting; buildings; croft houses; crofters; audios

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Crathie Township

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families. <br /> <br /> Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie remembers washday. She also talks about the various types of food that was eaten by the crofters.<br /> <br /> (Image - Ruins at Crathie)<br /> <br /> 'Interviewer: Can you remember how people washed their clothes, generally, in Crathie?<br /> <br /> Well, they all had tubs, the wooden tubs, made out of the half-barrels with the handles on them and they stamped them, with their feet.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did they make a fire outside?<br /> <br /> Yes, they'd a fire - heated their water outside, near their strupa, you see, that they hadn't to carry their water far. It was always lovely weather at that time too.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Can you remember much about - what were the main items of people's diets?<br /> <br /> Well, they had, for breakfast it was always porridge. Charlie Ogg always had porridge and honey, the old man, always, and he ate it with a horn spoon. He always did that. And we got cream with our porridge too. The milk came from Allan Macgregor's. I'd go along and get it. They was a wee cream pail, for carrying it back and fore in, and we had our breakfast after I came back. And on Sunday we got boiled eggs. I always remember that. And oatcakes, and their own, their own scones, and pancakes and that was the common, the common. Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you find many of them eating meat? Was there - ?<br /> <br /> Oh yes. Well, they had, you see, in these days they could kill a sheep if they wanted. Was nothing to stop them and then there was plenty venison always given out by the landlord - Sir John Ramsden - was very good at handing out venison in these days. And the odd one fished and that, themselves. Could do that when the tenants weren't around, they were allowed to fish and things like that.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So you considered that they were well fed?<br /> <br /> And rabbits. Rabbits and hares. Oh yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Everyone was quite - ?<br /> <br /> Oh yes. And, of course, they all had herring, salt herring, as well, yes. They bought their salt herring from the shop and took it home in buckets and pails - so many dozen in a pail - that's the way they took it home. They came with their pails for their herring, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Was there a local source of meal?<br /> <br /> Well, they, they put their own meal down to Kingussie, to the mill, to Dallas the miller, and it came back in meal form, meal, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did many of them make their own cheese?<br /> <br /> I can't ever say that I'd seen cheese in Crathie, but they certainly made their own butter and own crowdie, and had plenty of it, and they salted it for the winter.'