Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (15 of 25)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_ROSIE_CAMPBELL_15
PLACENAME
Crathie
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Laggan
DATE OF RECORDING
7 December 1983
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Rosie Campbell
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41265
KEYWORDS
deserted townships
crofts
crofting
buildings
croft houses
crofters
audios

Get Adobe Flash player

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families.

Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie describes how the crofters made a living.

(Image - Ruins at Crathie)

'Interviewer: So what would the major source of income have been for the crofters?

Well, They, I know that Mr Angus MacDougall, at Balmishaig [Ballmishaig], he went to ghillie to Sherramore, and so did his two horses, because they were Garrons they had, and they were used there all summer for going to the hill for deer and that, and the panniers. And in the wintertime the crofters, they were all their horses, they all more or less went as ghillies up to the lodges at Glen Shirra and Sherramore. And in wintertime they took the coal from Newtonmore Station, up the Glen, and it was ready for the summer again, for them coming. I've seen as many as six or seven carts passing my home in Laggan Bridge, in the morning, at the back of seven, going to Newtonmore Station and coming back with their load of coal, each cart with a load of coal, going back home with it. And they would be doing that in the early Spring and the late backend, and then, during the beginning of the year, they would be there helping to put the butts in order for the shooting. Butts is what they use for the grouse shooting, and they would be doing that at that time. And that sort of was subsidising their croft as well.

In the summertime they cut the corn at night and the hay when they came home, and the women did the work of it, and the children. And another thing I should have said earlier they - during the year, while the crop was growing, there was no fences, and they herded the cattle, and were able to use the bank of the river, from the bridge right down till you were at the, where you, well now you don't go through it. There was an up and down brae at the end of, down past Coul, and that was the sort of where Blargie and Coul were together and they got the grazing of the whole of the side of the river there, and herded the cattle there. The children did it and I've been there doing that too, in the summertime. They'd beautiful, lovely grass that was there with lots of wild flowers in it, buttercups and daisies, and all the different flowers were there growing in the - it was a very good - and you see they couldn't let the cattle out on the, in Crathie, because they would have been right into their corn and their turnips and their hay.

Interviewer: Those were the main crops?

That was the main crops, yes. And the potatoes, of course, was the main crop too.'

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (15 of 25)

INVERNESS: Laggan

1980s

deserted townships; crofts; crofting; buildings; croft houses; crofters; audios

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Crathie Township

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families. <br /> <br /> Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie describes how the crofters made a living.<br /> <br /> (Image - Ruins at Crathie)<br /> <br /> 'Interviewer: So what would the major source of income have been for the crofters?<br /> <br /> Well, They, I know that Mr Angus MacDougall, at Balmishaig [Ballmishaig], he went to ghillie to Sherramore, and so did his two horses, because they were Garrons they had, and they were used there all summer for going to the hill for deer and that, and the panniers. And in the wintertime the crofters, they were all their horses, they all more or less went as ghillies up to the lodges at Glen Shirra and Sherramore. And in wintertime they took the coal from Newtonmore Station, up the Glen, and it was ready for the summer again, for them coming. I've seen as many as six or seven carts passing my home in Laggan Bridge, in the morning, at the back of seven, going to Newtonmore Station and coming back with their load of coal, each cart with a load of coal, going back home with it. And they would be doing that in the early Spring and the late backend, and then, during the beginning of the year, they would be there helping to put the butts in order for the shooting. Butts is what they use for the grouse shooting, and they would be doing that at that time. And that sort of was subsidising their croft as well.<br /> <br /> In the summertime they cut the corn at night and the hay when they came home, and the women did the work of it, and the children. And another thing I should have said earlier they - during the year, while the crop was growing, there was no fences, and they herded the cattle, and were able to use the bank of the river, from the bridge right down till you were at the, where you, well now you don't go through it. There was an up and down brae at the end of, down past Coul, and that was the sort of where Blargie and Coul were together and they got the grazing of the whole of the side of the river there, and herded the cattle there. The children did it and I've been there doing that too, in the summertime. They'd beautiful, lovely grass that was there with lots of wild flowers in it, buttercups and daisies, and all the different flowers were there growing in the - it was a very good - and you see they couldn't let the cattle out on the, in Crathie, because they would have been right into their corn and their turnips and their hay.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Those were the main crops?<br /> <br /> That was the main crops, yes. And the potatoes, of course, was the main crop too.'