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TITLE
Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (16 of 25)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_ROSIE_CAMPBELL_16
PLACENAME
Crathie
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Laggan
DATE OF RECORDING
7 December 1983
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Rosie Campbell
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41266
KEYWORDS
deserted townships
crofts
crofting
buildings
croft houses
crofters
audios

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Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families.

Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie remembers croft animals, machinery and forms of transport.

(Image - Ruins at Crathie, as seen from the Glen Markie road. © Copyright Richard Webb, licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence 2.0)

'Interviewer: What animals would they have kept? You mentioned the garron?

Yes, the horses, and cows. Well, I don't know if they went into any - always good milking cows - I couldn't just say that they were, they weren't the big, what we have today. They weren't like the Fresians or anything like that. They were just ordinary good cattle for crofters; black and white, and brown and white, and that. And some of them had the blue-greys.

Interviewer: Would anyone have kept bees at all in Crathie?

Yes, Charlie Ogg kept bees. They had bees, quite a lot of bees. That's how he was able to have honey on his porridge.

Interviewer: And how about pigs? Were there any pigs in Crathie at all?

I can't say that I ever saw pigs in Crathie.

Interviewer: And hens would be quite common?

Oh, every house had hens, yes.

Interviewer: Were there any machines used on the crofts, at all?

Well they had the ordinary plough, the old fashioned iron plough. They did all the cutting by scythe, and they had harrows, and cruppers. That was about all the machinery that they really had.

Interviewer: Do you remember these coming in, or - ?

Well, as far as I can remember they were there. I mean, as far back as I can remember they were all round Laggan, these things, at that time, in the crofting areas.

Interviewer: Was there any new machines coming in or was it - ?

No, there was no tractors or anything came in at that, till long, long after that and it was to the bigger farms that they came when they did come.

Interviewer: And did anyone own any cars or lorries?

No, there was nothing, no. There was no cars or lorries in it at all. Nobody had anything like that. No. At that time, in Laggan, there was only - Well, when I was seven, my parents got their first car, and the doctor had one before that, and the minister, and the farmer in Breakachy, Mr Robertson, who later came to Drumgask's farm, they had cars. And the factor at Loch Laggan had a car, Cluny MacPherson of Cluny had a car while they were in residence, and they were all T-fords, and that's about the ones that had cars that were in the whole area.'

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Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (16 of 25)

INVERNESS: Laggan

1980s

deserted townships; crofts; crofting; buildings; croft houses; crofters; audios

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Crathie Township

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families. <br /> <br /> Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie remembers croft animals, machinery and forms of transport.<br /> <br /> (Image - Ruins at Crathie, as seen from the Glen Markie road. © Copyright Richard Webb, licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence 2.0)<br /> <br /> 'Interviewer: What animals would they have kept? You mentioned the garron?<br /> <br /> Yes, the horses, and cows. Well, I don't know if they went into any - always good milking cows - I couldn't just say that they were, they weren't the big, what we have today. They weren't like the Fresians or anything like that. They were just ordinary good cattle for crofters; black and white, and brown and white, and that. And some of them had the blue-greys.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Would anyone have kept bees at all in Crathie?<br /> <br /> Yes, Charlie Ogg kept bees. They had bees, quite a lot of bees. That's how he was able to have honey on his porridge.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And how about pigs? Were there any pigs in Crathie at all?<br /> <br /> I can't say that I ever saw pigs in Crathie.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And hens would be quite common?<br /> <br /> Oh, every house had hens, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Were there any machines used on the crofts, at all?<br /> <br /> Well they had the ordinary plough, the old fashioned iron plough. They did all the cutting by scythe, and they had harrows, and cruppers. That was about all the machinery that they really had.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Do you remember these coming in, or - ?<br /> <br /> Well, as far as I can remember they were there. I mean, as far back as I can remember they were all round Laggan, these things, at that time, in the crofting areas.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Was there any new machines coming in or was it - ?<br /> <br /> No, there was no tractors or anything came in at that, till long, long after that and it was to the bigger farms that they came when they did come.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And did anyone own any cars or lorries?<br /> <br /> No, there was nothing, no. There was no cars or lorries in it at all. Nobody had anything like that. No. At that time, in Laggan, there was only - Well, when I was seven, my parents got their first car, and the doctor had one before that, and the minister, and the farmer in Breakachy, Mr Robertson, who later came to Drumgask's farm, they had cars. And the factor at Loch Laggan had a car, Cluny MacPherson of Cluny had a car while they were in residence, and they were all T-fords, and that's about the ones that had cars that were in the whole area.'