Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (17 of 25)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_ROSIE_CAMPBELL_17
PLACENAME
Crathie
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Laggan
DATE OF RECORDING
7 December 1983
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Rosie Campbell
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41267
KEYWORDS
deserted townships
crofts
crofting
buildings
croft houses
crofters
audios

Get Adobe Flash player

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families.

Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie talks about the roads in and around Crathie.

(Image - Ruins at Crathie)

'Interviewer: So, what were the roads like?

Oh, the roads were just done with gravel, taken from gravel pits that they opened, and that clay from clay pits put over it, to make it bind. And the county roller came up, at different times; the roller came and rolled parts of the road when they would be doing it up. It often stayed for months in Laggan when it would be up doing the roads.

Interviewer: An this would come - ?

Filling the potholes and doing all these sort of things.

Interviewer: This would come up to Crathie?

And the Crathie road was looked after by Mr Cameron, who was the father of the Camerons that were, lived in the barracks, and he had a contract for doing the road from Drummond to Laggan Bridge, and he employed the Crathie crofters with their carts to, the gravel and binding, when he would be doing anything.

Interviewer: And these would be quite badly affected by rain and snow, would they, or - ?

Yes, well, they, wear and tear. And then, I mean, there wasn't the same, they were narrow roads, very narrow roads, very brae at that time and quite a lot of gates on them, you see, it was - though it was a public road - there was a lot of gates because it was to keep the sheep in their own areas, and the people that lived there, well, the gates were a big help to these people so you always closed them, going up and down.

Interviewer: And how did vehicles get up to Glen Shirra?

Well, they had to go by the new, what we called the 'new road'. When the bridge wasn't finished, Sir John had a road going in for to go to Glen Shirra and Sherramore from, near where the forestry houses are in Laggan now, and that was called the 'new road'. There was a wooden bridge crossed them, the Marshie there, and you went right round past the chapel, and right on till you came onto the original General Wade's road, where you would meet it had the road come up the other way from Laggan. And at the top of that same brae there was the old General Wade's road that came in from the top of the Gorsten in Laggan, right up, past Dalchully, right up and came out at the chapel, and that joined the General Wade's road, and that was the original General Wade's road which, Mr Porter, that bought Dalchully, closed, and which had no right to be closed, as it was a right of way, and is till this day. But the new proprietor has opened it, and has done it up, and I hear he intends to tar it. He's going to tar it, I understand, right through to the top of the brae again, but in the meantime, it's going as far as Dalchully.

There used to be a signpost on it saying, 'General Wade's Road - Right of Way to Corrieyairack ' at the Laggan Bridge end of the Dalchully road, and Dalchully had the road coming in like a triangle; this one from Laggan, and this one from Kinlochlaggan, and there was a Dalchully letter box where their mails were left. And on the other side of the road there was Johnnie Cope's wood and that's where Johnnie Cope turned back and roasted the ox, and until a few years ago, the main trees that the ox was roasted on were standing there, and Sir John Ramsden planted trees round it and had a fence but of course that's all gone away. But, the trees are, I think there is a fence round it yet, but not like it was, and this trees were beginning to get very old, but they had two knacks out of them, you know, like that, where they could have roasted the ox from, and the ground was bare just at the bottom, and never grew anything on it, where the fire had been. It was always like that, as long as I was a child and going for walks that way, many years afterwards.'

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (17 of 25)

INVERNESS: Laggan

1980s

deserted townships; crofts; crofting; buildings; croft houses; crofters; audios

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Crathie Township

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families. <br /> <br /> Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie talks about the roads in and around Crathie.<br /> <br /> (Image - Ruins at Crathie)<br /> <br /> 'Interviewer: So, what were the roads like?<br /> <br /> Oh, the roads were just done with gravel, taken from gravel pits that they opened, and that clay from clay pits put over it, to make it bind. And the county roller came up, at different times; the roller came and rolled parts of the road when they would be doing it up. It often stayed for months in Laggan when it would be up doing the roads.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: An this would come - ?<br /> <br /> Filling the potholes and doing all these sort of things.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: This would come up to Crathie?<br /> <br /> And the Crathie road was looked after by Mr Cameron, who was the father of the Camerons that were, lived in the barracks, and he had a contract for doing the road from Drummond to Laggan Bridge, and he employed the Crathie crofters with their carts to, the gravel and binding, when he would be doing anything. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: And these would be quite badly affected by rain and snow, would they, or - ?<br /> <br /> Yes, well, they, wear and tear. And then, I mean, there wasn't the same, they were narrow roads, very narrow roads, very brae at that time and quite a lot of gates on them, you see, it was - though it was a public road - there was a lot of gates because it was to keep the sheep in their own areas, and the people that lived there, well, the gates were a big help to these people so you always closed them, going up and down.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And how did vehicles get up to Glen Shirra?<br /> <br /> Well, they had to go by the new, what we called the 'new road'. When the bridge wasn't finished, Sir John had a road going in for to go to Glen Shirra and Sherramore from, near where the forestry houses are in Laggan now, and that was called the 'new road'. There was a wooden bridge crossed them, the Marshie there, and you went right round past the chapel, and right on till you came onto the original General Wade's road, where you would meet it had the road come up the other way from Laggan. And at the top of that same brae there was the old General Wade's road that came in from the top of the Gorsten in Laggan, right up, past Dalchully, right up and came out at the chapel, and that joined the General Wade's road, and that was the original General Wade's road which, Mr Porter, that bought Dalchully, closed, and which had no right to be closed, as it was a right of way, and is till this day. But the new proprietor has opened it, and has done it up, and I hear he intends to tar it. He's going to tar it, I understand, right through to the top of the brae again, but in the meantime, it's going as far as Dalchully. <br /> <br /> There used to be a signpost on it saying, 'General Wade's Road - Right of Way to Corrieyairack ' at the Laggan Bridge end of the Dalchully road, and Dalchully had the road coming in like a triangle; this one from Laggan, and this one from Kinlochlaggan, and there was a Dalchully letter box where their mails were left. And on the other side of the road there was Johnnie Cope's wood and that's where Johnnie Cope turned back and roasted the ox, and until a few years ago, the main trees that the ox was roasted on were standing there, and Sir John Ramsden planted trees round it and had a fence but of course that's all gone away. But, the trees are, I think there is a fence round it yet, but not like it was, and this trees were beginning to get very old, but they had two knacks out of them, you know, like that, where they could have roasted the ox from, and the ground was bare just at the bottom, and never grew anything on it, where the fire had been. It was always like that, as long as I was a child and going for walks that way, many years afterwards.'