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TITLE
Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (18 of 25)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_ROSIE_CAMPBELL_18
PLACENAME
Crathie
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Laggan
DATE OF RECORDING
7 December 1983
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Rosie Campbell
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41268
KEYWORDS
deserted townships
crofts
crofting
buildings
croft houses
crofters
audios

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Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families.

Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie talks about fuel, travelling folk, and van deliveries.

(Image - Ruins at Crathie)

'Interviewer: Would there have been any wood burnt in the domestic fires?

Oh yes, they got trees out of the wood, what would be wind-blown and, and the like of that, from the wood, to use. Oh yes, the woods near them.

Interviewer: And what other fuel would have been used?

Oh peat, they all had peat, yes. They all cut their peat up in the back of Crathie. They cut the peat. I've been there at the cutting of the peat. I've seen it being put out and that there, away up above Crathie shop, up, sort of up onto the flat ground up there was - not so much behind the shop, sort of, as the Markie swung round more up the back that way that they did that. And up near there there's a very old churchyard up there, as well, where they cut the peat.

Interviewer: When would that have died out?

Eh, oh well, as the houses died out.

Interviewer: They were using right to the end?

Oh yes, they would, Charlie would have been having his peat, I'm sure, right to the end, too. As far as I know he would have had peat. I think he was getting coal latterly but he was the only house left there.

Interviewer: And was coal being used alongside peat?

Not very much in my day, it was all peat and sticks they had. You see, there was plenty trees getting blown and that, and they had plenty employees on the estate who could put, cleaned out the woods and that, and they got these sticks to burn, and that.

Another thing that was there at Crathie was when you crossed the Markie, the first, you had to cross the Markie with a horse and cart or anything, and, the ford, and then there was a huge piece of land at the foot of what they called the Mile wood, and that was a tinkers' encampment, and they always camped there, and did a lot of their tin-smithing, they were there for about a fortnight, doing tin-smithing, and then they came down the valley then selling them from that area.

And then you've crossed, again, you've crossed the river to come out on the other side to join onto General Wade's road again, at that time. I've crossed there in my father's van manys a time, in the van, when he would be going with loads to, for the winter, you see, they'd go to the keepers and the, up the Glen, with their meal and flour and they all took in sugar and butter - a winter's supply. And I would be often up in the van with him and he'd be doing that for a drive. He did that twice a year - May, and he did it in November, before the November term. They took in their supplies for the winter then, and then, in the summer they did the same. They had the main things - meal and that up there - and dogs' food, and biscuits for dogs, and things like that, went up there, and also, of course, meal for their hens as well, and ducks and that. We all kept ducks and hens in all these places.'

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Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (18 of 25)

INVERNESS: Laggan

1980s

deserted townships; crofts; crofting; buildings; croft houses; crofters; audios

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Crathie Township

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families. <br /> <br /> Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie talks about fuel, travelling folk, and van deliveries.<br /> <br /> (Image - Ruins at Crathie)<br /> <br /> 'Interviewer: Would there have been any wood burnt in the domestic fires?<br /> <br /> Oh yes, they got trees out of the wood, what would be wind-blown and, and the like of that, from the wood, to use. Oh yes, the woods near them.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And what other fuel would have been used?<br /> <br /> Oh peat, they all had peat, yes. They all cut their peat up in the back of Crathie. They cut the peat. I've been there at the cutting of the peat. I've seen it being put out and that there, away up above Crathie shop, up, sort of up onto the flat ground up there was - not so much behind the shop, sort of, as the Markie swung round more up the back that way that they did that. And up near there there's a very old churchyard up there, as well, where they cut the peat. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: When would that have died out?<br /> <br /> Eh, oh well, as the houses died out.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: They were using right to the end?<br /> <br /> Oh yes, they would, Charlie would have been having his peat, I'm sure, right to the end, too. As far as I know he would have had peat. I think he was getting coal latterly but he was the only house left there.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And was coal being used alongside peat?<br /> <br /> Not very much in my day, it was all peat and sticks they had. You see, there was plenty trees getting blown and that, and they had plenty employees on the estate who could put, cleaned out the woods and that, and they got these sticks to burn, and that. <br /> <br /> Another thing that was there at Crathie was when you crossed the Markie, the first, you had to cross the Markie with a horse and cart or anything, and, the ford, and then there was a huge piece of land at the foot of what they called the Mile wood, and that was a tinkers' encampment, and they always camped there, and did a lot of their tin-smithing, they were there for about a fortnight, doing tin-smithing, and then they came down the valley then selling them from that area. <br /> <br /> And then you've crossed, again, you've crossed the river to come out on the other side to join onto General Wade's road again, at that time. I've crossed there in my father's van manys a time, in the van, when he would be going with loads to, for the winter, you see, they'd go to the keepers and the, up the Glen, with their meal and flour and they all took in sugar and butter - a winter's supply. And I would be often up in the van with him and he'd be doing that for a drive. He did that twice a year - May, and he did it in November, before the November term. They took in their supplies for the winter then, and then, in the summer they did the same. They had the main things - meal and that up there - and dogs' food, and biscuits for dogs, and things like that, went up there, and also, of course, meal for their hens as well, and ducks and that. We all kept ducks and hens in all these places.'