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TITLE
Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (23 of 25)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_ROSIE_CAMPBELL_23
PLACENAME
Crathie
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Laggan
DATE OF RECORDING
7 December 1983
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Rosie Campbell
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
41273
KEYWORDS
deserted townships
crofts
crofting
buildings
croft houses
crofters
audios

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Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families.

Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie talks about the clipping season in Crathie.

(Image - Ruins at Crathie)

'Interviewer: Can you tell us about the, the clipping?

Yes, well the clipping was done in Glen Markie, and they gathered all the sheep in, like the - Coul went in with them. The farmer at Coul at that time were Kennedys, and there was the father and mother and two sons, a maid and an uncle, and they all worked on the farm. And then some of the men, the sons would go out and do the gatherings, the Crathie shepherd and with the, and the men themselves were quite fit, like Allan MacGregor and Archie Baldie were quite fit at that time, to go out and do the gathering.

And food was all taken up in a cart, and actually used to be one of the coal carts, one of the sons that came with the cart, later in the day, you see, and took the food and everything up. Mammy Cherlie [?] made the soup and all that the day before, in huge pots, and they went up, and then they put on a big fire up there and heated it up, up there at the fank - that was a place for doing that. And they would have tea as soon as she arrived. The men that had been out gathering, the first thing they would get, as soon as she arrived, was tea and scones and oatcakes and cheese and things like that, because they'd been out from early morning. And then they had their dinner in the middle of the day and, the meat, the cold meat, was it at the fank, and soup. Then they would have tea again, and they'd have tea before they went home at night again. And all the wool was packed in the bags and taken home in the carts at night.'

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Crathie: Life in a Crofting Township (23 of 25)

INVERNESS: Laggan

1980s

deserted townships; crofts; crofting; buildings; croft houses; crofters; audios

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum: Crathie Township

Crathie was one of the last Badenoch townships to be abandoned in the 20th century. Situated north of the River Spey, at the entrance to Glen Markie, Crathie once supported thirty families. <br /> <br /> Rosie Campbell, a native of Laggan, used to spend her childhood summers in Crathie, staying with her friend Maggie MacPherson. In this audio extract Rosie talks about the clipping season in Crathie.<br /> <br /> (Image - Ruins at Crathie)<br /> <br /> 'Interviewer: Can you tell us about the, the clipping?<br /> <br /> Yes, well the clipping was done in Glen Markie, and they gathered all the sheep in, like the - Coul went in with them. The farmer at Coul at that time were Kennedys, and there was the father and mother and two sons, a maid and an uncle, and they all worked on the farm. And then some of the men, the sons would go out and do the gatherings, the Crathie shepherd and with the, and the men themselves were quite fit, like Allan MacGregor and Archie Baldie were quite fit at that time, to go out and do the gathering.<br /> <br /> And food was all taken up in a cart, and actually used to be one of the coal carts, one of the sons that came with the cart, later in the day, you see, and took the food and everything up. Mammy Cherlie [?] made the soup and all that the day before, in huge pots, and they went up, and then they put on a big fire up there and heated it up, up there at the fank - that was a place for doing that. And they would have tea as soon as she arrived. The men that had been out gathering, the first thing they would get, as soon as she arrived, was tea and scones and oatcakes and cheese and things like that, because they'd been out from early morning. And then they had their dinner in the middle of the day and, the meat, the cold meat, was it at the fank, and soup. Then they would have tea again, and they'd have tea before they went home at night again. And all the wool was packed in the bags and taken home in the carts at night.'